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Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Drug Study (DC*MADS), 1992: Drug Use Among DC Women Delivering Live Births in DC Hospitals

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : clinical data, survey data
Creator
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
1998-04-28
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse
Language
English
Free Keywords
alcohol; alcohol consumption; cocaine; demographic characteristics; drug testing; drug use; drugs; hallucinogens; health care access; heroin; infants; inhalants; insurance coverage; live births; marijuana; mental health; population characteristics; pregnancy; prenatal care; reproductive history; sedatives; smoking; stimulants; substance abuse treatment; tobacco use; tranquilizers; urban population; women
Description
  • Abstract

    The Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Drug Study (DC*MADS) was conducted in 1991, and included special analyses of homeless and transient delivering live births in the DC hospitals. DC*MADS was undertaken to assess the full extent of the drug problem in one metropolitan area. The study was comprised of 16 separate studies that focused on different sub-groups, many of which are typically not included or are underrepresented in household surveys.The DC*MADS: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Livebirths in DC Hospitals was designed to examine the nature and extent of drug use among women delivering live births in eight Washington, DC, hospitals participating in the study. Data from the questionnaires include prenatal care, health problems during pregnancy, pregnancy drug use history, needle use, polysubstance use, patterns of use, respondent's general experiences with drug use, including perceptions of the risks and consequences of use, occurrence of psychological and emotional problems, income and insurance coverage, treatment experiences, and maternal and infant outcomes. Medical records were abstracted from the women and their infants to document medical problems. Abstracted data on the mothers included demographics, discharge diagnoses, disposition at discharge, and results of urine screens. Abstracted data on infants included delivery information, status at discharge, discharge diagnoses/procedures, and first urine toxicology screen results.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Standardized missing values.; Created online analysis version with question text.; Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: The interview response rate was 86.7 percent. Of those interviewed, 68.8 percent agreed to have medical records abstracted for themselves and their infants, resulting in an abstraction response rate of 59.7 percent.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Infant Data
    • DS2: Mother Data
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 1992
  • 1992-01 / 1992-12
    Collection date: 1992-01--1992-12
Geographic Coverage
  • District of Columbia
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Women delivering live births in Washington, DC, hospitals.
Sampling
Eight of nine Washington, DC, hospitals participated in the study. Eligible respondents were women delivering live births in participating hospitals during a given period. High-risk women, defined as those giving birth to low birth weight or pre-term infants or those admitting to drug use, were oversampled.
Collection Mode
  • record abstracts, face-to-face interview

    To protect the anonymity of respondents, all variables that could be used to identify individuals have been encrypted, collapsed, or deleted. These modifications should not affect analytic uses of the data.

    Produced by Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, NC.

Note
2008-12-15 New files were added. These files included one or more of the following: Stata setup, SAS transport (CPORT), SPSS system, Stata system, SAS supplemental syntax, and Stata supplemental syntax files, and tab-delimited ASCII data file. Some other minor edits were made to improve the data and documentation.2006-01-18 File CB2347.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse.
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 2347 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR02347.v1
Publications
  • Rosenbaum, Paul R.. Opportunities, devices, and instruments. Design of Observational Studies.New York: Springer. 2010.
    • ID: 10.1007/978-1-4419-1213-8_5 (DOI)
  • Campbell, Cynthia, Alexander, Jeffrey A., Lemak, Christy Harris. Organizational determinants of outpatient substance abuse treatment duration in women. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.37, (1), 64-72.2009.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.jsat.2008.09.012 (DOI)
  • CSR Incorporated. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Directory. Arlington, VA: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2007.
    • ID: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/2007DataDirectory/2007%20Data%20Directory.pdf (URL)
  • Coleman, Priscilla K., Reardon, David C., Cougle, Jesse R.. Substance use among pregnant women in the context of previous reproductive loss and desire for current pregnancy. British Journal of Health Psychology.10, (2), 255-268.2005.
    • ID: 10.1348/135910705X25499 (DOI)
  • Brady, Thomas M, Visscher, Wendy, Feder, Moshe, Burns, Allison M. Maternal drug use and the timing of prenatal care. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.14, (4), 588-607.2003.
    • ID: 10.1353/hpu.2010.0700 (DOI)
  • Visscher, Wendy A., Feder, Moshe, Burns, Allison M., Brady, Thomas M., Bray, Robert M.. The impact of smoking and other substance use by urban women on the birthweight of their infants. Substance Use and Misuse.38, (8), 1063-1093.2003.
    • ID: 10.1081/JA-120017651 (DOI)
  • Flavin, Jeanne. A glass half full? Harm reduction among pregnant women who use cocaine. Journal of Drug Issues.32, (3), 973-998.2002.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260203200315 (DOI)
  • Bray, Robert M.. The Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Drug Study. Drug Use in Metropolitan America.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 1999.
  • Bray, Robert M., Marsden, Mary Ellen. Implications of findings for policy and research. Drug Use in Metropolitan America.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 1999.
  • Bray, Robert M., Marsden, Mary Ellen, Vincus, Amy A.. Impact of drug use in metropolitan America. Drug Use in Metropolitan America.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 1999.
  • Visscher, Wendy A., Bray, Robert M., Kroutil, Larry A.. Drug use and pregnancy. Drug Use in Metropolitan America.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 1999.
  • (author unknown). Prevalence of Drug Use in the DC Metropolitan Area Institutionalized Population, 1991. Technical Report.4, Rockville, MD: United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1994.
  • (author unknown). Prevalence of Drug Use in the Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Homeless and Transient Population, 1991. Technical Report.2, Rockville, MD: United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1993.
  • Bray, Robert M., Marsden, Mary Ellen. Drug use and related problems among household residents. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior.42, (2), 3691992.
  • Lambert, Elizabeth Y.. The Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Drug Study: Overview and challenges. American Psychological Association 100th Annual Convention.Washington, DC. 1992.
  • Lambert, E.Y.. Overview of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area Drug Study (DC*MADS). Epidemiologic Trends in Drug Abuse Proceedings: December 1991.Rockville, MD: United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1991.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 8 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse (1998): Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area Drug Study (DC*MADS), 1992: Drug Use Among DC Women Delivering Live Births in DC Hospitals. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02347