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Clients of Street Prostitutes in Portland, Oregon, San Francisco and Santa Clara, California, and Las Vegas, Nevada, 1996-1999

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Monto, Martin A. (University of Portland)
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2000-08-04
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
human behavior; pornography; prostitution; sex offenses; sexual attitudes; sexual behavior
Description
  • Abstract

    These data were collected to examine the background characteristics, attitudes, and reported behaviors of arrested clients of prostitutes, with particular attention to the issue of violence against women. Client intervention programs in four cities provided opportunities for gathering information from men arrested for trying to hire street prostitutes. For the study, a detailed anonymous questionnaire was administered to men before the beginning of every client intervention workshop in San Francisco, California, and Portland, Oregon. The questionnaire was also administered at a small program in Santa Clara, California, which was modeled after the San Francisco program. During the course of the study, the Portland program ceased operations and a new program began in Las Vegas, which became a significant source of data. Men were asked about their sexual behavior, including the number and type of partners, frequency of sex, interest in pornography, age and circumstances of first sexual encounter with a prostitute, sexual acts performed with prostitutes, and condom use with prostitutes. Clients were also asked about their attitudes toward premarital sex, homosexual sex, extramarital sex, and sex between adults and children. Other questions probed men's views about prostitutes, the legality of prostitution, and violence against women. Background information gathered on clients included race, educational level, sexual orientation, marital status, work status, socioeconomic status, age, parents' marital status, history of sexual or physical abuse, military service, relationship history, and sexual preferences.
  • Abstract

    In the late 1990s, prostitution had become an issue of increasing concern to law enforcement officials, women's organizations, and community members. The presence of prostitution negatively affected the livability of neighborhoods, potentially harmed local businesses, and was associated with illicit drug use and other vice. Prostitutes were at high risk of contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and prostitution had the potential to become a vector for the transmission of STDs to clients and their spouses or partners. Perhaps most significantly, prostitutes themselves were frequent victims of violent crimes. Research and policy had focused attention primarily on prostitutes rather than on their clients. In 1995, two creative programs, Portland's Sexual Exploitation Education Project (SEEP) and San Francisco's First Offender Prostitution Program (FOPP), began to address the issue of prostitution differently, focusing prevention efforts on the demand side of the supply/demand equation, the clients of prostitutes. The overwhelming majority of men in these cities who were arrested for paying or attempting to pay for sex participated in the intervention programs. Some were required to attend the program as part of their sentence, while others received reduced fines or had the arrest purged from their records in exchange for their attendance. Using data gathered from men attending such programs, this study sought to provide information about this otherwise inaccessible population. In particular, this project sought to collect information about the background characteristics, attitudes, and reported behaviors of arrested clients, with particular attention to the issue of violent crime against women. The project was designed to answer the following questions: (1) What are the background characteristics of men who solicit prostitution? How do they differ from a representative sample of men? (2) What types of sex-related behaviors characterize men who solicit prostitution? (3) Why do men visit prostitutes? How consistent are their motivations with scholarly and popular understandings of the prostitution client? (4) What are the attitudes of prostitution clients toward violence against women? (5) What are the consequences of conceiving of sexuality as a commodity? (6) What are rates of recidivism for participants in prostitution client intervention programs?
  • Abstract

    Client intervention programs provided an unprecedented opportunity to gather information from the previously inaccessible population of men arrested for trying to hire street prostitutes. For this study, a detailed anonymous questionnaire was administered to men before the beginning of every client intervention workshop in San Francisco, California, and Portland, Oregon. The questionnaire was also administered at a small program in Santa Clara, California, which was modeled after the San Francisco program. During the course of the study, the Portland program ceased operations and a new program began in Las Vegas, which became a significant source of data. Both English and Spanish versions of the questionnaire were used when the researchers gathered the data.
  • Abstract

    Men were asked about their sexual behavior, including the number and type of partners, frequency of sex, interest in pornography, age and circumstances of first sexual encounter with a prostitute, sexual acts performed with prostitutes, and condom use with prostitutes. Clients were also asked about their attitudes toward premarital sex, homosexual sex, extramarital sex, and sex between adults and children. Other questions probed men's views about prostitutes, the legality of prostitution, and violence against women. Background information gathered on clients included race, educational level, sexual orientation, marital status, work status, socioeconomic status, age, parents' marital status, history of sexual or physical abuse, military service, relationship history, and sexual preferences.
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: Several Likert-type scales were used.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Over 80 percent.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • 1996 / 1999
    Time period: 1996--1999
  • 1997 / 1999
    Collection date: 1997--1999
Geographic Coverage
  • California
  • Las Vegas
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Portland (Oregon)
  • San Francisco
  • Santa Clara
  • United States
Sampling
Convenience sampling.
Collection Mode
  • The site variable in this file was blanked for confidentiality reasons. Users are not able to identify the name or location of the programs which individual respondents attended.

Note
2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (97-IJ-CX-0033).
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 2859 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR02859.v1
Publications
  • Monto, Martin A., Milrod, Christine. Ordinary or peculiar men? Comparing the customers of prostitutes with a nationally representative sample of men. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.58, (7), 802-820.2014.
    • ID: 10.1177/0306624X13480487 (DOI)
  • Joseph, Lauren J., Black, Pamela. Who's the man? Fragile masculinities, consumer masculinities, and the profiles of sex work clients. Men and Masculinities.15, (5), 486-506.2012.
    • ID: 10.1177/1097184X12458591 (DOI)
  • Das, Shyamal K., Esmail, Ashraf, Eargle, Lisa. Men's Exploration of Multiple Sexual Partners: Economic vs. Psychosocial Explanation. Bangladesh e-Journal of Sociology.6, (1), 27-53.2009.
    • ID: http://www.bangladeshsociology.org/BEJS%206.1.pdf (URL)
  • Monto, Martin A., Julka, Deana. Conceiving of sex as a commodity: A study of arrested customers of female street prostitutes. Western Criminology Review.10, (1), 1-14.2009.
    • ID: http://wcr.sonoma.edu/v10n1/Monto.pdf (URL)
  • Agnich, Laura E.. Masculinities and Sexual Violence among a Sample of Clients of Street Prostitutes. Thesis, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 2007.
  • Carter, Rebecca J.. The Clients of Street Prostitutes: Common Men or Criminals? Evidence of Two Distinct Behavioural Clusters in the Client Population. Thesis, University of Calgary. 2007.
  • Sen, Bisakha. Frequency of sexual activity among unmarried adolescent girls: Do state policies pertaining to abortion access matter?. Eastern Economic Journal.32, (2), 313-330.2006.
    • ID: http://mail.ejhs.org/volume11/Golder.htm (URL)
  • Monto, Martin A., McRee, Nick. A comparison of the male customers of female street prostitutes with national samples of men. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.49, (5), 505-529.2005.
    • ID: 10.1177/0306624X04272975 (DOI)
  • Tewksbury, Richard, Golder, Seana. Why do johns use pornography?: Predicting consumption of pornography by clients of street level prostitutes. Southwest Journal of Criminal Justice.2, (2), 101-118.2005.
  • Monto, Martin A.. Female prostitution, customers, and violence. Violence Against Women.10, (2), 160-188.2004.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801203260948 (DOI)
  • Busch, Noel B., Bell, Holly, Hotaling, Norma, Monto, Martin A.. Male customers of prostituted women: Exploring perceptions of entitlement to power and control and implications for violent behavior toward women. Violence Against Women.8, (9), 1093-1112.2002.
  • Monto, Martin A., Garcia, Steve. Recidivism among the customers of female street prostitutes: Do intervention programs help?. Western Criminology Review.3, (2), 1-10.2002.
    • ID: http://wcr.sonoma.edu/v3n2/monto.html (URL)
  • Monto, Martin A.. Prostitution and fellatio. Journal of Sex Research.38, (2), 140-145.2001.
    • ID: 10.1080/00224490109552081 (DOI)
  • Monto, Martin A., Hotaling, Norma. Predictors of rape myth acceptance among male clients of female street prostitutes. Violence Against Women.7, (3), 275-293.2001.
    • ID: 10.1177/10778010122182442 (DOI)
  • Monto, Martin A.. Why men seek out prostitutes. Sex for Sale: Prostitution, Pornography, and the Sex Industry.New York, NY: Routledge. 2000.
  • Monto, Martin A.. Focusing on the Clients of Street Prostitutes: A Creative Approach to Reducing Violence Against Women. Final Report.NCJ 182860, Washington, DC: University of Portland [producer], National Institute of Justice [distributor]. 1999.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/182860.pdf (URL)
  • Monto, Martin A.. Focusing on the Clients of Street Prostitutes: A Creative Approach to Reducing Violence Against Women. Summary Report.NCJ 182859, Washington, DC: University of Portland [producer], National Institute of Justice [distributor]. 1999.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/182859.pdf (URL)
  • Monto, Martin A.. Prostitution and Human Commodification: A Study of Arrested Clients of Female Street Prostitutes. American Sociological Association. 1999.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Monto, Martin A. (2000): Clients of Street Prostitutes in Portland, Oregon, San Francisco and Santa Clara, California, and Las Vegas, Nevada, 1996-1999. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02859