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Role of Stalking in Domestic Violence Crime Reports Generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department, 1998

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : administrative records data
Creator
  • Tjaden, Patricia (Center for Policy Research)
  • Thoennes, Nancy (Center for Policy Research)
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2001-10-01
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
crime prevention; crime reporting; domestic violence; police reports; risk assessment; stalking; victims
Description
  • Abstract

    This study examined the role of stalking in domestic violence crime reports produced by the Colorado Springs Police Department (CSPD). It provided needed empirical data on the prevalence of stalking in domestic violence crime reports, risk factors associated with intimate partner stalking, and police responses to reports of intimate partner stalking. The study was conducted jointly by the Justice Studies Center (JSC) at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and the Denver-based Center for Policy Research (CPR). JSC staff generated the sample and collected the data, and CPR staff processed and analyzed the data. The sample was generated from CSPD Domestic Violence Summons and Complaint (DVSC) forms, which were used by CSPD officers to investigate crime reports of victims and suspects who were or had been in an intimate relationship and where there was probable cause to believe a crime was committed. During January to September 1999, JSC staff reviewed and entered information from all 1998 DVSC forms into a computerized database as part of the evaluation process for Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT), a nationally recognized domestic violence prevention program. A subfile of reports initiated during April to September 1998 was generated from this database and formed the basis for the study sample. The DVSC forms contained detailed information about the violation including victim and suspect relationship, type of violation committed, and specific criminal charges made by the police officer. The DVSC forms also contained written narratives by both the victim and the investigating officer, which provided detailed information about the events precipitating the report, including whether the suspect stalked the victim. The researchers classified a domestic violence crime report as having stalking allegations if the victim and/or police narrative specifically stated that the victim was stalked by the suspect, or if the victim and/or police narrative mentioned that the suspect engaged in stalking-like behaviors (e.g., repeated following, face-to-face confrontations, or unwanted communications by phone, page, letter, fax, or e-mail). Demographic variables include victim-suspect relationship, and age, race, sex, and employment status of the victim and suspect. Variables describing the violation include type of violation committed, specific criminal charges made by the police officer, whether the alleged violation constituted a misdemeanor or a felony crime, whether a suspect was arrested, whether the victim sustained injuries, whether the victim received medical attention, whether the suspect used a firearm or other type of weapon, whether items were placed in evidence, whether the victim or suspect was using drugs and/or alcohol at the time of the incident, number and ages of children in the household, whether children were in the home at the time of the incident, and whether there was a no-contact or restraining order in effect against the suspect at the time of the incident.
  • Abstract

    Several studies have found a link between stalking and violence perpetrated against women by intimates. As a result, the United States Department of Justice encouraged state and local jurisdictions to train police officers and other justice system officials about the potential risks associated with intimate partner stalking and the efficacy of using antistalking laws to respond to domestic violence and stalking. However, there was no systematic effort to measure the prevalence of stalking allegations in domestic violence crime reports or the ways in which justice system officials responded to these allegations. Thus, it was unclear how often domestic violence crime reports involved stalking and whether suspects in these cases were charged with stalking. This study examined the role of stalking in domestic violence crime reports generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department (CSPD). It provided needed empirical data on the prevalence of stalking in domestic violence crime reports, risk factors associated with intimate partner stalking, and police responses to reports of intimate partner stalking. The study sought to address the following questions: (1) How prevalent are stalking allegations in domestic violence crime reports? (2) What are the risk factors associated with domestic violence stalking? (3) How often are suspects of intimate partner stalking charged with stalking? (4) Do presenting conditions in domestic violence crime reports with stalking allegations differ significantly from those without stalking allegations? (5) Do law enforcement outcomes in domestic violence crime reports with stalking allegations differ significantly from those without stalking allegations?
  • Abstract

    The study was conducted jointly by the Justice Studies Center (JSC) at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and the Denver-based Center for Policy Research (CPR). JSC staff generated the sample and collected the data, and CPR staff processed and analyzed the data. The sample was generated from CSPD Domestic Violence Summons and Complaint (DVSC) forms, which were used by CSPD officers to investigate crime reports of victims and suspects who were or had been in an intimate relationship and where there was probable cause to believe a crime was committed. During January to September 1999, JSC staff reviewed and entered information from all 1998 DVSC forms into a computerized database as part of the evaluation process for Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT), a nationally recognized domestic violence prevention program. A subfile of reports initiated during April to September 1998 was generated from this database and formed the basis for the study sample. The DVSC forms contained detailed information about the violation including victim and suspect relationship, type of violation committed, and specific criminal charges made by the police officer. The DVSC forms also contained written narratives by both the victim and the investigating officer, which provided detailed information about the events precipitating the report, including whether the suspect stalked the victim. The researchers classified a domestic violence crime report as having stalking allegations if the victim and/or police narrative specifically stated that the victim was stalked by the suspect, or if the victim and/or police narrative mentioned that the suspect engaged in stalking-like behaviors (e.g., repeated following, face-to-face confrontations, or unwanted communications by phone, page, letter, fax, or e-mail).
  • Abstract

    Demographic variables include victim-suspect relationship, age, race, sex, and employment status of the victim and suspect. Variables describing the violation include type of violation committed, specific criminal charges made by the police officer, whether the alleged violation constituted a misdemeanor or a felony crime, whether a suspect was arrested whether the victim sustained injuries, whether the victim received medical attention, whether the suspect used a firearm or other type of weapon, whether items were placed in evidence, whether the victim or suspect was using drugs and/or alcohol at the time of the incident, number and ages of children in the household, whether children were in the home at the time of the incident, and whether there was a no-contact or restraining order in effect against the suspect at the time of the incident.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Standardized missing values.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: None.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Not applicable.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Role of Stalking in Domestic Violence Crime Reports Generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department, 1998
Temporal Coverage
  • 1998-04 / 1998-09
    Time period: 1998-04--1998-09
  • 1999-01 / 1999-09
    Collection date: 1999-01--1999-09
Geographic Coverage
  • Colorado
  • Colorado Springs
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Cases who were or had been in an intimate relationship and where there was probable cause to believe a crime was committed in Colorado Springs in 1998.
Sampling
Not applicable.
Collection Mode
  • The user guide and codebook are provided by ICPSR as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided on the ICPSR Web site.

Note
2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (97-WT-VX-0002).
Availability
Download
This study is freely available to the general public via web download.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 3142 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Publications
  • Rosenfeld, Barry. Violence risk factors in stalking and obsessional harrassment: A review and preliminary meta-analysis. Criminal Justice and Behavior.31, (1), 9-36.2004.
    • ID: 10.1177/0093854803259241 (DOI)
  • Tjaden, Patricia, Thoennes, Nancy. Stalking: Its Role in Serious Domestic Violence Cases, Executive Summary. NCJ 187346, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 2001.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/187346.pdf (URL)
  • Tjaden, Patricia, Thoennes, Nancy. Stalking: Its Role in Serious Domestic Violence Cases, Final Report. NCJ 187446, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 2001.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/187446.pdf (URL)
  • Tjaden, Patricia, Thoennes, Nancy. Role of Stalking in Domestic Violence Crime Reports Generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department. Violence and Victims.1, (4), 427-441.2000.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Tjaden, Patricia; Thoennes, Nancy (2001): Role of Stalking in Domestic Violence Crime Reports Generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department, 1998. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03142.v1