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Intimate Partner Homicide in California, 1987-2000

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : administrative records data, aggregate data, survey data
Creator
  • Wells, William (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections)
  • DeLeon-Granados, William
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2003-06-19
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
African Americans; arrest rates; battered women; criminal justice system; domestic violence; ethnicity; gender; Hispanic or Latino Americans; homicide; victimization; White Americans; womens shelters
Description
  • Abstract

    Since 1976, the United States has witnessed a steady and precipitous decline in intimate partner homicides. This study builds on the work of Dugan et al. (1999, 2000) and Browne and Williams (1989) by examining, in greater detail, the relationship between intimate partner homicide and gender, race, criminal justice system response, and domestic violence services. Specifically, the study examines the net effect of criminal justice system response and federally-funded domestic violence shelters on victimization of white, African American, and Hispanic males and females. This study used aggregated data from the 58 counties in California from 1987 to 2000. Homicide data were gathered by the State of California Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center. Data on domestic violence resources were obtained from the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Planning, Domestic Violence Branch, in the form of detailed reports from domestic violence shelters in the state. Based on these records, the researchers computed the number of federally-funded shelter-based organizations in a given county over time. Data on criminal justice responses at the county level were gathered from the State of California Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center. These data included domestic violence arrests and any convictions and incarceration that followed those arrests. The researchers disaggregated these criminal justice system measures by race and gender. In order to account for population differences and changes over time, rates were computed per 100,000 adults (age 18 and older).
  • Abstract

    Since 1976, the United States has witnessed a steady and precipitous decline in intimate partner homicides. At first glance, the trend appears to signal success brought about by two decades of criminal justice policy improvement and domestic violence resource enhancement. However, much work and scientific analysis remain to be done. This study builds on the work of Dugan et al. (1999, 2000) and Browne and Williams (1989) by examining, in greater detail, the relationship between intimate partner homicide and gender, race, criminal justice system response, and domestic violence services. Specifically, the study examines the net effect of criminal justice system response and federally-funded domestic violence shelters on victimization of white, African American, and Hispanic males and females. This study is unique in its focus on rural and urban settings and Hispanic victims.
  • Abstract

    This study used aggregated data from the 58 counties in California from 1987 to 2000. Focusing on California permitted the researchers to obtain reliable and standardized data for a large number of counties featuring diversity in population, in rural and urban characteristics, and with a variety of domestic violence criminal justice responses and shelter resources. Homicide data were gathered by the State of California Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center. These data provided detailed information on homicides committed in California from 1987 to 2000, such as whether the victim and offender were intimate partners, the county of the homicide, whether the offenders and victims were adults, and the race and gender of victims and offenders. Data on domestic violence resources were obtained from the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Planning, Domestic Violence Branch, in the form of detailed reports from domestic violence shelters in the state. Because only recent data (starting in 1997) were available in machine-readable format, the researchers used the hardcopy reports from the individual shelter-based service providers in the state. State records indicated the number of years federal funding was provided to each community organization. Based on these records, the researchers computed the number of federally-funded shelter-based organizations in a given county over time. Data on criminal justice responses at the county level were gathered from the State of California Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center. Arrests for violation of California penal code 273.5 were classified as domestic violence arrests. Data were gathered on any convictions and incarceration that followed an arrest for domestic violence. Incarcerations included prison sentences, jail sentences, and sentences to probation that included some jail time. The researchers disaggregated these criminal justice system measures by race and gender. In order to account for population differences and changes over time, rates were computed per 100,000 adults (age 18 and older).
  • Abstract

    Variables include county name, whether the county was rural or urban, year, and number of federally-funded shelters in the county. Additional county-level variables are provided for the county's entire adult population, white adults, Black adults, Hispanic adults, males, females, white males, Black males, Hispanic males, white females, Black females, and Hispanic females. These variables are population, number of intimate partner homicide victims, number of non-intimate partner homicide victims, intimate partner homicide victimization rate, non-intimate partner homicide victimization rate, number of domestic violence arrests, number convicted, sentenced, sentenced to prison, sentenced to probation, sentenced to probation with jail, and sentenced to jail after an arrest for domestic violence, domestic violence arrest rate, one-year lagged domestic violence arrest rate, conviction (following domestic violence arrest) rate, one-year lagged conviction rate, incarceration (following domestic violence arrest) rate, and one-year lagged incarceration rate. Other variables are number of shelters per 100,000 women, Black women, Hispanic women, non-white women, and white women, one-year lagged shelter rate for all women, Black women, Hispanic women, and white women, non-white male domestic violence arrest rate, non-white male conviction and incarceration rates (following arrest for domestic violence), one-year lagged non-white male domestic violence arrest rate, one-year lagged non-white male conviction and incarceration rates (following arrest for domestic violence), and non-white female intimate and non-intimate partner homicide victimization rates.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created online analysis version with question text..
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: None.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Not applicable.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Intimate Partner Homicide in California, 1987-2000
Temporal Coverage
  • 1987 / 2000
    Time period: 1987--2000
  • Collection date: 2002
Geographic Coverage
  • California
  • United States
Sampled Universe
All counties in California from 1987 to 2000.
Note
Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2000-WT-VX-0012).
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 3501 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR03501.v1
Publications
  • Wells, William, Ren, Ling, DeLeon-Granados, William. Reducing intimate partner homicides: The effects of federally-funded shelter service availability in California. Journal of Criminal Justice.38, (4), 512-519.2010.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2010.04.021 (DOI)
  • DeLeon-Granados, William, Wells, William, Binsbacher, Ruddyard. Arresting developments: Trends in female arrests for domestic violence and proposed explanations. Violence Against Women.12, (4), 355-371.2006.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801206287315 (DOI)
  • DeLeon-Granados, William, Wells, William. The Reliability and Validity of Measures of Domestic Violence Resources as Used in Intimate Partner Homicide Research. Violence Against Women.9, (2), 148-162.2003.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801202239002 (DOI)
  • Wells, William, DeLeon-Granados, William. Analysis of Unexamined Issues in the Intimate Partner Homicide Decline: Race, Quality of Victim Services, Offender Accountability, and System Accountability, Final Report. NCJ 196666, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 2002.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/196666.pdf (URL)

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Wells, William; DeLeon-Granados, William (2003): Intimate Partner Homicide in California, 1987-2000. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03501