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The 500 Family Study [1998-2000: United States]

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : clinical data, event/transaction data, survey data
Creator
  • Schneider, Barbara
  • Waite, Linda J
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2008-05-30
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
adolescents; child care; child rearing; domestic responsibilities; dual career families; everyday life; family relationships; family work relationship; housework; job satisfaction; life satisfaction; lifestyles; parent child relationship; quality of life; school age children; social interaction; social life; stress; time utilization; work; working hours
Description
  • Abstract

    The 500 Family Study was designed to obtain in-depth information on middle class, dual-career families living in the United States. To understand the complex dynamics of today's families and the strategies they use to balance the demands of work and family, over 500 families from 8 cities across the United States were studied. To address different issues facing parents with older and younger children, families with adolescents and families with kindergartners were included in the sample. Working mothers and fathers are now splitting their time between their responsibilities to their family, and to their respective occupations. This study of 500 families explores how work affects the lives and well-being of parents and their children. The study's data allows researchers to explore a broad range of questions: How do dual-career families manage and organize their resources and time between family and work?; How do work conditions, including characteristics of the job and workplace environment, affect the quality of relationships among household members?; How do dual career parents manage the moral and social development and learning experiences of their children?; How do the work-related responsibilities of working parents affect their child's moral, social, and educational development?; What effect is consumerism and technology having on how working families direct the moral and social development of their children?; What do parents believe is their role regarding the child-care of their children and how they should fulfill that role both in terms of time and in the allocation of economic and social resources? What are some of the resources in the community that parents use to supervise their children?; How do families regard the "free time" of adolescents and how they allocate adolescent "free time" in maintenance of the household?; What is the quality of relationships among family members?; To obtain a detailed picture of work and family life, mothers, fathers, and their children were asked to complete a series of instruments including surveys, in-depth interviews, and time diaries. These instruments were designed to provide information about work, marriage, child care and parental supervision, management of household tasks, time allocations, coping strategies, and psychological well-being. The four datasets associated with this data collection are summarized below: The Cortisol Data contains information for a subsample of families that elected to participate in a study of psychological stress. Parents and teenagers who agreed to participate completed an additional two days of ESM data collection. The health survey that was administered reported on a variety of health and lifestyle issues that might affect cortisol (stress hormone) levels such as medication use, consumption of caffeine and alcohol, use of nicotine, timing of menstrual cycle, pregnancy, presence of chronic illness, and respondent's height and weight. Additionally, parents reported on the health of the children (teenagers and kindergartners) participating in the study.; The Experience Sampling Method (ESM) Data contains a variety of information related to how individuals spend their time, who they spent it with, and what activities they were engaged in over the course of a typical week. Respondents wore programmed wrist watches that emitted signals (beeps) throughout the day. When possible, family members were placed on identical signaling schedules to provide information on a range of family activities. At the time of each beep, participants were asked to complete a self-report form which asked them to answer a number of open-ended questions about their location, activities, who they were with, and psychological states. Several Likert and semantic-differential scales were used to assess participants' psychological states.; The Parent Data contains basic demographic information from respondents as well as detailed information about parents' occupation job duties, income, work schedule, benefits (e.g., medical care, flexible work schedules, and family leave), and the consequences of their jobs (e.g. long hours, job stress, having to work weekends). Additionally, the data contain information about the extent to which parents experienced work-family conflict and what changes might help with better balance of the demands of work and family (e.g., more flexible work hours, more help from spouses with household and child care responsibilities, improved child care, and after-school care arrangements). Parental attitudes toward traditional arrangements, how household tasks were actually divided among family members, and how often the family paid for services (e.g., cleaning, yard work, meal preparation) were also captured. The data also contain information about how children are socialized in families with two working parents. Topics about the frequency with which parents engaged in various activities with their children (e.g., talking, eating meals together, attending religious services), how frequently parents monitored their teenager's activities, and how often they talked with their teenager about school activities, plans for college, career plans, friendships, and peer pressure.; The Adolescent Data contains data for sixth through twelfth graders, which focuses on family relationships and experiences, school experiences, paid work, psychological well-being and behavioral problems, and plans for the future (e.g., college, career, and marriage -- including expectations regarding spouses' sharing of responsibility for child care, cooking, chores, and paid work). To allow for comparison of parents' and adolescents' responses to similar questions, several items appear in both the adolescent and parent data. These items include the frequency with which parents and adolescents discuss school events, college and career plans, participation in religious and other activities, gender role attitudes and the division of household tasks within the family, and items measuring depression, stress, and anxiety.; Qualitative Data -- Interviews The main purpose of the interviews was to explore topics addressed in the parent and adolescent surveys in greater detail. Parent interviews were designed to examine how working parents cope with the demands of work and family life. Adolescent interviews touched on similar themes but altered questions to gauge the adolescent's perceptions of their parents work and family lives. Kindergartner interviews were brief and focused on children's after-school and child care arrangements and time spent with parents.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created online analysis version with question text.; Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: Depression Depression was assessed with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The scale measures the frequency of depressive symptoms experienced by respondents over the course of the previous week. Marital Satisfaction Marital satisfaction was measured with the 15-item ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Scale. This scale asks couples to assess their satisfaction with key aspects of their marriage such as communication, financial management, and parenting. Time Use and Management Respondents' day-to-day lives were captured using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). This is a unique method for examining how individuals spend their time, who they spend it with, and what activities they are engaged in over the course of a typical week. Parent Surveys To assure comparability with national datasets, several questions that were used in the parent survey were drawn from other surveys including the 1990 United States Census, the Current Population Survey, the National Survey of Families and Households, the General Social Survey, the Quality of Employment Survey, and the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) of 1988-2000. Additional items measuring anxiety, anger, self-esteem, and stress were drawn from Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, Taylor's Anxiety and Anger Inventories, and Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale. Mothers and fathers of kindergartners were asked to complete a 20-item Parenting Hassles Scale, which assesses the degree of stress or difficulty parents experience in dealing with conflicts that routinely occur in families with young children. Adolescent Surveys To ensure comparability with national surveys of adolescents, survey items were drawn from several previous studies, including NELS 1988-2000, the Sloan Study of Youth and Social Development, the General Social Survey, and the Families in Communities Study. A modification of items from the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment was also included as a measure of adolescent attachment. Standardized Child Assessments Three sets of standardized assessments were used to assess young children's cognitive and social competence, school readiness, and behavioral problems. These assessments included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Harter Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for Young Children, and the Child Behavior Checklist.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Of the 512 families who participated in the study, 327 were families with teenagers, 157 families had kindergartners, and 28 had both teenagers and kindergartners.
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Cortisol Data
    • DS2: Experience Sampling Method (ESM) Data
    • DS3: Parent Data
    • DS4: Student Data
    • DS5: Qualitative Interview Data
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 1998-02-01--2000-06-01
  • 1998-02-01 / 2000-06-01
  • Collection date: 1997--2001
  • 1997 / 2001
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampling
The 500 Family Study sample is purposive (nonrandom) and is comprised of data collected from communities throughout the United States (five in the Midwest, one in the Southeast, one in the Northeast, and one on the West Coast). These communities were largely urban or suburban, with only one rural site. Participants were solicited through local public high schools and elementary schools via advertisements that appeared in local newspapers, and through snowball recruitment. Of the 500 families that were studied, 300 families had teenaged children and 200 families had kindergarten-aged children. Seven of the eight communities studied were also studied in the SLOAN STUDY OF YOUTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, 1992-1997 [UNITED STATES] (ICPSR 4551). Sixty-three families who participated in SSYSD consented to participate in the current study.
Collection Mode
  • mail questionnaire
  • face-to-face interview
  • self-enumerated questionnaire
Note
Funding institution(s): Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (200-6-14 and 3003-6-20 (2nd funding cycle)).
Availability
On-site
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 4549 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR04549.v1
Publications
  • Wickham, Robert E., Macia, Kathryn S.. Examining cross-level effects in dyadic analysis: A structural equation modeling perspective. Behavior Research Methods.2018.
    • ID: 10.3758/s13428-018-1117-5 (DOI)
  • Garcia, John A.. The race project: Researching race in the social sciences researchers, measures, and scope of studies. Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics.2, (2), 300-346.2017.
    • ID: 10.1017/rep.2017.15 (DOI)
  • Rycraft Nicholson, Cara. Predictors of Adolescent Delinquency: Comparing Models and Additive Effects. Dissertation, Roosevelt University. 2014.
  • Erol, R.Y., Orth, U.. Actor and partner effects of self-esteem on relationship satisfaction and the mediating role of secure attachment between the partners. Journal of Research in Personality.47, (1), 26-35.2013.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.jrp.2012.11.003 (DOI)
  • Offer, Shira. Family time activities and adolescents' emotional well-being. Journal of Marriage and Family.75, (1), 26-41.2013.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.01025.x (DOI)
  • Offer, Shira, Schneider, Barbara. Revisiting the gender gap in time-use patterns: Multitasking and well-being among mothers and fathers in dual-earner families. American Sociological Review.76, (6), 809-833.2011.
    • ID: 10.1177/0003122411425170 (DOI)
  • Weston, William. The college class at work and home. Society.48, (3), 236-241.2011.
    • ID: 10.1007/s12115-011-9415-x (DOI)
  • Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research. Exploring the Second Shift: A Data-Driven Learning Guide. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research. 2009.
    • ID: 10.3886/secondshift (DOI)
  • Searing Hines, Christy M.. Who's Frying the Bacon when Both are Bringing It Home?: Carework and Marital Satisfaction in Dual Earner Couples. Thesis, University of Maryland-Baltimore County. 2009.
  • Offer, Shira, Schneider, Barbara. The emotional dimensions of family time and their implications for work-family balance. Handbook of Work-Family Integration: Research, Theory, and Best Practices.Maryland Heights, MO: Academic Press. 2008.
  • Adam, Emma K., Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie, Gunnar, Megan R.. Social regulation of stress physiology in infancy, childhood and adulthood: Implications for mental health and education. Human Behavior and the Developing Brain: Atypical Development.New York: Guilford Press. 2007.
  • Broege, Nora, Owens, Ann, Graesch, Anthony P., Arnold, Jeanne E., Schneider, Barbara. Calibrating measures of family activities between large-and small-scale data sets. Sociological Methodology.37, (1), 119-149.2007.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1467-9531.2007.00194.x (DOI)
  • Offer, Shira, Schneider, Barbara. Children's role in generating social capital. Social Forces.85, (3), 1125-1142.2007.
    • ID: 10.1353/sof.2007.0049 (DOI)
  • Pendry, P., Adam, E.K.. Associations between parents' marital functioning, maternal parenting quality, maternal emotion and child cortisol levels. International Journal of Behavior Development.31, 218-231.2007.
    • ID: 10.1177/0165025407074634 (DOI)
  • Snyder, Karrie Ann. A vocabulary of motives: Understanding how parents define quality time. Journal of Marriage and Family.69, (2), 320-340.2007.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2007.00368.x (DOI)
  • Adam, E.K.. Transactions among trait and state emotion and adolescent diurnal and momentary cortisol activity in nautralistic settings. Psychoneuroendocrinology.31, (5), 664-679.2006.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2006.01.010 (DOI)
  • Broege, Nora, Owens, Ann, Schneider, Barbara, Graesch,Anthony P., Arnold, Jeanne E.. Uniting Perspectives: Assessing Togetherness at Home for Middle-Class Dual-Earner Families. Working Paper 06-01.East Lansing, MI: Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work. 2006.
  • Kurina, L.M.. Emotional and relational correlates of depression of dual-earner families: The key contexts of gender and family life stage. Population Association of America Meeting.Los Angeles, CA. 2006.
  • Kurina, L.M., Schneider, B., Waite, L.J.. Emotional and relational correlates of depression in dual-earner families: The key contexts of gender and family life stage. Population Association of American 2006 Annual Meeting.Los Angeles, CA. 2006.
    • ID: http://paa2006.princeton.edu/papers/60395 (URL)
  • Kutina, L. M.. Emotional and relational correlates of depression in dual-earner families: The key contexts of gender and family life stage. Population Association of America Meeting.Los Angeles, CA. 2006.
  • Lewin, A.C., Snyder, K.. Balancing work and home: The relationship between quality time and work-family conflict. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.Montreal, Canada. 2006.
  • Lewin, A.C., Snyder, K.. Parenting demands, work demands, and work-family conflict. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation International Conference on Why Workplace Flexibility Matters: A Global Perspective.Chicago, IL. 2006.
  • Matjasko, Jennifer L., Feldman, Amy F.. Bringing work home: The emotional experiences of mothers and fathers. Journal of Family Psychology.20, (1), 47-55.2006.
    • ID: 10.1037/0893-3200.20.1.47 (DOI)
  • Snell, E., Adam, E.K.. Adolescents’ momentary emotion and motivation at school and at study: Family influences. unpublished manuscript. 2006.
  • Weinshenker, M.N.. Adolescents' expectations about mothers' employment: Life course patterns and parental influence. Sex Roles.54, 845-857.2006.
    • ID: 10.1007/s11199-006-9052-9 (DOI)
  • Weinshenker, M.N.. Fatherhood timing and men's employment, hours, and earnings. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation International Conference on Why Workplace Flexibility Matters: A Global Perspective.Chicago, IL. 2006.
  • Adam, E.K.. Social relationships and the regulation of stress hormones. Introductory Conference of Cells to Society: the Center on Social Disparities and Health at the Institute for Policy Research.Evanston, IL. 2005.
  • Adam, Emma K.. Momentary emotion and cortisol levels in the everyday lives of working parents. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Broege, Nora, Owens, Ann, Schneider, Barbara, Graesch,Anthony P., Arnold, Jeanne E.. Uniting Perspectives: Assessing Togetherness at Home for Middle-Class Dual-Earner Families. Working Paper 05-03.East Lansing, MI: Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work. 2005.
  • Dempsey, N.P.. Television Use and Communication Within Families With Adolescents. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Hoogstra, L.. The design of the 500 Family Study. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Jeong, J.G.. Obtaining accurate measures of time use from the ESM. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Kalil, A., Levine, J.A., Ziol-Guest, K.M.. Following in their parents' footsteps: How characteristics of parental work predict adolescents' interest in parents' jobs. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Koh, C.. The everyday emotional experiences of husbands and wives. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Lee, Y.. Measuring the gender gap in household labor: Accurately estimating wiives and husbands' contributions. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Lee, Y.. Measuring the gender gap in household labor: Accurately estimating wives and husbands’ contributions. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Lee, Yun-Suk, Waite, Linda J.. Husbands' and wives' time spent on housework: A comparison of measures. Journal of Marriage and Family.67, (2), 328-336.2005.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.0022-2445.2005.00119.x (DOI)
  • Lewin, A.C.. Marriage and the Family . Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Maier, K.S.. Transmitting educational values: Parent occupation and adolescent development. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Marchena, Elaine A.. Adolescents' assessments of parental role management in dual-earner families. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Martinez, S.. Women's intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for working. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Matjasko, J.L., Feldman, A.F.. Emotional transmission between parents and adolescents : The importance of work characteristics and relationship quality. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Nielsen, M.R.. Couples making it happen: Marital satisfaction and what works for highly satisfied couples. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Pendry, P., Adam, E.K.. Associations between marital discord, parenting, and child's stress physiology: The role of child age and parent gender. Marital Discord and Child Development: Developmental and Transactional Perspectives on the Role of Basic Regulatory Processes. Symposium conducted at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research and Child Development.Atlanta, GA. 2005.
  • Rubinstein, Y., Mulligan, C.B.. Estimating and imputing incomes for middle class families. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Schmidt, J.A.. Religiosity, emotional well-being, and family processes in working families. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda J.. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda J.. Why study working families?. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Sexton, H.R.. Spending time at work and at home: What workers do, how they feel about it, and how these emotions affect family life. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Snell, E.K., Adam, E.K.. Schooling, parental involvement, and adolescent emotion. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development.Atlanta, GA. 2005.
  • Snyder, Karrie. Vocabularies of Quality Time. Working Paper 04-02.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2005.
  • Steunkel, C. P.. A strategy for working families: High-level commodification of household services. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Stuenkel, Carolyn P.. A strategy for working families: High-level commodification of household services. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Weinshenker, M.N.. Imagining family roles: Parental influences on the expectations of adolescents in dual-career families. Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance.New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 2005.
  • Adam, E.K.. Social regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in human infants, children and adolescents. Stress and Asthma.Arlington, VA. 2004.
  • Adam, E.K.. Social regulation of hypothalamtic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in human infants, young children, and adolescents. Early experience: When does it become disruptive for brain development and behavior? Invited paper symposium conducted at the 4th Forum of European Neuroscience.Lisbon, Portugal. 2004.
  • Adam, E.K.. Adolescent experiences and stress hormone levels in home and school contexts. National Academy of Education Fall Forum.Stanford, CA. 2004.
  • Adam, E.K.. Regulation of stress-hormone activity by family and community contexts: Potential implications for health. Frontiers of Family Research, a special session of the National Council on Family Relations.Orlando, FL. 2004.
  • Deschamps, A.. Father involvement in unmarried families: Research using the fragile families and child wellbeing study. Population Roundtable Session, American Sociological Association.San Francisco, CA. 2004.
  • Jeong, J.. ESM as a time use instrument: Comparing ESM with FDD. Sloan Center Workshop at the University of Chicago.Chicago, IL. 2004.
  • Kalil, Ariel, Ziol-Guest, K.M.. Parental job loss and children's academic progress. Center for Advanced Social Science Research.New York, NY. 2004.
  • Kurina, L.M., Schneider, B., Waite, L.J.. Stress, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and cortisol patterns in working partners. Stress and Health.20, (2), 53-63.2004.
    • ID: 10.1002/smi.998 (DOI)
  • Kurina, Lianne, Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda. Gender, Depressive Symptoms, and Psychological Permeability: A Study in Dual-Earner Families. Working Paper 04-02.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2004.
  • Offer, S.. A contextual approach to the Study of Social Support among Working Families. Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.San Francisco, CA. 2004.
  • Offer, S.. Community effects and social support in dual-earner families. Sloan Work-Family Centers Annual conference, MIT.Cambridge, MA. 2004.
  • Offer, Shira, Schneider, Barbara. A contextual approach to the Study of Social Support among Working Families. American Sociological Association Roundtable Discussion .Chicago, IL. 2004.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Ainbinder, Alisa M., Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. Stress and working parents. Work and Leisure.New York, NY: Routledge. 2004.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Maternal employment across the life course: Adolescent expectations and paternal influence. Sloan Work-Family Centers Annual Conference, MIT.Cambridge, MA. 2004.
  • Adam, E.K., Pendry, P.. Salivary cortisol and family functioning: Effects of emotion, conflict and parenting. XXXIII Congress of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology.Pisa, Italy. 2003.
  • Courter, Ann. Having it All: Dual Professional Careers and Family. Working Paper 03-19.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Deschamps, A.. Law, language, and incomplete institutionalization: How does parental involvement differ within two-parent, lesbian, headed families?. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.San Francisco, CA. 2003.
  • Kurina, L.M.. Cortisol patterns and stress in working parents. Society for Epidemiological Research Meeting.Atlanta, GA. 2003.
  • Kurina, Lianne M., Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda J.. Cortisol Patterns Show Little Relationship to Stress or Symptoms of Anxiety or Depression in Working Parents. Working Paper 03-06.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Lee, Y.S., Moen, P.. Work-family time dynamics: Continuity and change in couples' time use. 2003 annual meeting of the Population Association for America.Minneapolis, MN. 2003.
  • Lippold, Melissa, Beachy-Quick, Kristy. Unemployment and the Quality of Family Life: Hidden Benefits and Potential Consequences of Job Loss for the Middle Class. Working Paper 03-14.University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Marchena, E., Schneider, B.. The influence of fathers' work on adolescent well-being. Annual meeting for Society for Research in Child Development.Tampa, FL. 2003.
  • Marchena, Elaine. Making the Grade: Parental Work-family Conflict Through The Eyes of Teens. Working Paper 03-11: . University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Marchena, Elaine. Shared Experiences of Work-family Role Conflict Among Middle Class Dual-Earner Couples. Working Paper 03-12.of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Marchena, Elaine. The Intersection of Work and Family Life in Middle Class Dual-Earner Families. Dissertation, University of Chicago. 2003.
  • Offer, S.. The social support networks of working families. Sloan Conference.Los Angeles, CA. 2003.
  • Offer, Shira, Schneider, Barbara. A Contextual Approach To The Study Of Social Support Among Working Families. Working Paper 03-08.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Pendry, P., Adam, E. K.. Hormones under siege: Parent behavior, parent emotional and marital functioning and child cortisol. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.Tempa, FL. 2003.
  • Rice, Holly, Schneider, Barbara. Feeling Good and Feeling Cooperative: The Importance of Religious Practice, Familial Duties, and Service Activities in the Lives of Adolescents. Working Paper 03-05.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Rice, Holly, Hoogstra, Lisa. Importance of Religion In Adolescents' Lives. Working Paper 03-09.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Waite, L.J., Schneider, B.. Studying working families: The experience sampling method. Meetings of the Eastern Sociological Society.Philadephia, PA. 2003.
  • Waite, Linda, Schneider, Barbara, Rice, Holly. . Studying Working Families: The Experience Sampling Method. Working Paper 03-07.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Expected Maternal Employment across the Life Course: A Latent Class Regression Analysis. Working Paper 03-01.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Maternal employment across the life course: Adolescent expectations and parental influence. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.Atlanta, GA. 2003.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Maternal Employment Across the Life Course: Adolescent Expectations and Parental Influence. Working Paper 03-16.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2003.
  • Adam, E.K.. Measuring stress in families: Combining biological and phenomenological approaches. International Conference on Time pressure, Work-family interface, and Parent-child relationships.Waterloo, Ontario. 2002.
  • Adam, E.K.. Momentary emotion and cortisol activity in adolescents' everyday lives. Adolescent hormone-behavior relations: Moderating effects of age, sex, social context and psychopathology. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence.New Orleans, LA. 2002.
  • Adam, E.K., Chase-Lansdale, P.L.. Home sweet home(s): Parental separations, residential moves and adjustment problems in low-income adolescent girls. Developmental Psychology.38, (6), 792-805.2002.
    • ID: 10.1037/0012-1649.38.5.792 (DOI)
  • Bell, Talitha. Adolescent Television Viewing, Psychological Development, and Family Communication. Working Paper 02-16.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Dempsey, N.P.. Televison use and communication within families of adolescents. Family Section Roundtables, annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Dempsey, Nicholas P.. Television Use and Communication within Families of Adolescents. Working Paper 2-10.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Deschamps, A.. The relative equality of same-sex households: Preliminary findings of the 500 Family Study. Gender Studies Workship at the University of Chicago.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Deschamps, Allison. Law, Language, and Incomplete Institutionalization: How Does Parental Involvement Differ within Two-Parent, Lesbian, Headed Families?. Working Paper 02-19.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Gatzeva, Mariana, Dempsey, Nicholas P.. Determinants of Housework. Working Paper 02-13.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Koh, C.Y.. Family well-being and mother's work hours. Persons, Processes, and Places: Research on Families, Workplaces, and Communities Conference.San Francisco, CA. 2002.
  • Kurina, L.M.. Cortisol patterns and stress in working parents. Invited Research Seminar, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Kurina, L.M., Schneider, B., Waite, L.J.. Cortisol patterns and depressive symptoms in working families. How Families Work: Crosscurrents in Sloan-Funded Research on Working Families at Sloan Working Families Centers Network Conference.Atlanta, GA. 2002.
  • Lee, Y.S.. Housework and psychological depression for adolescents: The importance of working together with the parents. Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Section on Sociology of Children and Youth Refereed Roundtables and Business Meeting - Peer and Family Contexts in Adolescence.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Lee, Y.S., Schneider, B., Waite, L.J.. Determinants of social and educational consequences of children's housework. Social Studies of Children and Youth.Stamford, CT: JAI Press. 2002.
  • Maier, K.. Transmission of educational values: Parents' occupation and adolescent development. Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Section on Sociology of Education Open Paper Session: Peers, Parents, and Socialization.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Maier, Kimberley S., Waite, Linda J., Schneider, Barbara. Planning Ahead: An Examination of Adolescents' Mood, Motivation and Self-Esteem in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Values. Working Paper 02-07.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Marchena, E.. Making the grade: Parental work-family role conflict through the eyes of teens. Population Association of America Meetings.Altanta, GA. 2002.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, Linda J.. Re-assessing family goals and attitudes in late adolescence: The effects of natal family experiences and early family formation. Meaning and Choice: Value Orientations and Life Course Decisions.Brussels: Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute. 2002.
  • Martinez, S.. Women's work lives as subjective and objective experiences. Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Student Forum, Refereed Student Roundtables: Women and Occupations I.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Martinez, S., Rice, H., Stuenkel, C.. Atlas coding. Sloan Center for Working Families.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Nielsen, M.R.. Marital satisfaction of middle-and upper middle-class dual earner couples: What works and what does not work. Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.Chicago, IL. 2002.
  • Nielsen, Mark R.. Are all Marriages the Same? Marital Satisfaction of Middle-Class Couples. Working Paper 02-09.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Nielsen, Mark Russell. Are all Marriages the Same? Marital Satisfaction of Middle-Class Couples. Dissertation, University of Chicago. 2002.
  • Schaafsma, M, Rudd, E.. Finding the organization in work-family research. Persons, Processes, and Places: Research on Families, Workplaces, and Communities Conference.San Francisco, CA. 2002.
  • Schneider, B.. Today's working families: The importance of quality time. Inaugural Speaker Series. Berger Institute for Work, Family, and Children, Claremont McKenna College.Claremont, CA. 2002.
  • Schneider, B., Waite, L.J., Rice, H.. Feeling good about your work: Emotional variations in different work-related tasks. How Families Work: Crosscurrents in Sloan-Funded Research on Working Families.Atlanta, GA. 2002.
  • Schneider, B., Waite, L.J., Rice, H., Ainbinder, A.. Enjoying your work: Differences in emotion when working, preparing work, and socializing with co-workers. Time Pressure, Work-Family Interface, and Parent-Child Relationships: An International Time-Use Conference.Waterloo, Ontario. 2002.
  • Stuenkel, C.. In-home child care: A pathway to hidden high-level commodification of household services. Persons, Processes, and Places: Research on Families, Workplaces, and Communities Conference.San Francisco, CA. 2002.
  • Waite, L.J., Schneider, B., Luo, Y.. Searching for the tme bind: Emotions at home and work. How Families Work: Crosscurrents in Sloan-Funded Research on Working Families.Atlanta, GA. 2002.
  • Waite, Linda. Marriage and the dual-career family. International Encyclopedia for the Behavioral and Social Sciences.New York, NY: Elsevier. 2002.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Dads who clean, parents who push, and adolescents' expectations about marital roles. Sloan Network Conference.Atlanta, GA. 2002.
  • Weinshenker, Matthew. Dads Who Clean, Parents Who Push, and Adolescents' Expectations about Marital Roles. Working Paper 02-11.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2002.
  • Adam, E.K.. Adult attachment, cortisol reactivity and dirunal cortisol activity in mothers of toddlers. Psychophysiological perspectives on the adult attachment interview. Symposium conducted at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.Minneapolis, MN. 2001.
  • Adam, E.K.. Dirunal cortisol activity and cortisol reactivity in the everyday lives of parents and children. Well-being and dysfunction across the generations: Change and continuity, Jacobs Foundation Conference.Marbach Castle, Germany . 2001.
  • Adam, E.K.. Diurnal Cortisol Activity and Cortisol Reactivity in the Everyday Lives of Parents and Children [poster]. Well-being and Dysfunction Across the Generations: Change and Continuity, Jacobs Foundation Conference.Marbach Castle, Germany. 2001.
  • Adam, E.K.. Parent employment, parent emotion and stress, and behavioral, cognitive and emotional outcomes in young children. Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work workshop series .Chicago, IL. 2001.
  • Adam, E.K.. Parental employment conditions, parent emotions and parenting, and behavioral, emotional and cognitive outcomes in young children. The long arm of the job: Influences of parental work conditions on family life. Symposium conducted at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.Minneapolis, MN. 2001.
  • Adam, E.K., Gunnar, M.R.. Relationship functioning and home and work demands predict individual differences in diurnal cortisol patterns in women. Psychoneuroendocrinology.26, (2), 189-208.2001.
    • ID: 10.1016/S0306-4530(00)00045-7 (DOI)
  • Adam, Emma K. Parent Employment Conditions, Parent Emotion, and Parenting and Outcomes in Young Children. Working Paper 01-24.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Adam, Emma K.. Momentary Experience Sampling of Emotion, Cognition, and Cortisol Activity in Adolescents and Their Parents. Working Paper 01-23.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Dempsey, Nicholas. The Functions of Television and Other Media in Family Life. Working Paper 01-02.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Jeong, Jaeki. Time Use Estimates from the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). Working Paper 01-28.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Kalil, Ariel, Levine, Judith. Following in Their Parents' Footsteps: How Characteristics of Parental Work Predict Adolescents' Interest in Parents' Jobs. Working Paper 01-19.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work.. 2001.
  • Koh, C.Y.. Exchange of hearts: Emotional variations in married couples. Sociology of Emotion Section Roundtable, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.Anaheim, CA. 2001.
  • Koh, C.Y.. Happy together? A comparison of daily emotions between spouses. Learning Emotions and Gender in Families Section of the 2001 Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) annual meeting.St .Louis, MO. 2001.
  • Koh, Chi-Young. Happy Together? A Comparison of Daily Emotions between Spouses. Working Paper 01-08.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Lee, Y.S.. Housework and subjective well-being for adolescents. Annual meeting of the Population Association of America.Washington, DC. 2001.
  • Lee, Y.S.. Housework in the family economy: Fathers, mothers, and adolescents. Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.Anaheim, CA. 2001.
  • Lee, Y.S., Waite, L.J.. Perspectives on the family economy: Survey and ESM measures of housework time of mom, dad and teen in working families. Dutiful Occasions: Working Families, Everyday Lives, University of Michigan.Ann Arbor, MI. 2001.
  • Lee, Yun-Suk, Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda. Children and Housework: Some Unanswered Questions. Working Paper 01-10.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Levine, Judith. Do Female Dominated Occupations Ease Work-Family Conflict?. Working Paper 01-16.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Maier, Kim, Schneider, Barbara, Waite, Linda J.. Math and Science Career Parents: How They Interact and Impact College and Career Planning with Their Teens. Working Paper 01-22.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Marchena, E.. Parental work-family balance and adolescent family life. Learning Emotions and Gender in Families Section of the 2001 Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) annual meeting.St . Louis, MO. 2001.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, L.J.. Re-assessing family goals and attitudes in late adolescence: The effects of natal family experiences and early family formation. Annual meetings of the Population Association of America.Washington, DC. 2001.
  • Marchena, Elaine. Can You Pencil Me In? How Adolescents Assess Their Parents' Work-Family Conflict. Working Paper 01-06.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Neilsen, M.R.. Martial satisfaction doesn't add up. Dutiful Occasions: Working Families, Everyday Lives.Ann Arbor, MI. 2001.
  • Schmidt, J.A.. Is religion good for kids? Religiosity, parent-child interaction, and adolescent outcomes in working families. Dutiful Occasions: Working Families, Everyday Lives, annual meetings of the Sloan Work-Family Centers.Ann Arbor, MI. 2001.
  • Schneider, B.. Driving, dating, and time alone: Child care needs for teens. Illinois Child Care: Making Connections.Springfield, IL. 2001.
  • Schneider, B., Ainbinder, A.. Stress in working moms and dads. Dutiful Occasions: Working Families, Everyday Lives, University of Michigan .Ann Arbor, MI. 2001.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Ainbinder, Alisa, Waite, Linda. Working Families: Thresholds of Stress at Work and Home. Working Paper 01-01.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Shibley Hyde, Janet, Else-Quest, Nicole M., Goldsmith, H. Hill. The Impact of Children's Temperament and Behavior Problems on Their Employed Mothers. Working Paper 01-12.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Stolzenberg, Ross M., Williams, Kristi. Work Satisfaction and Spouse Health: Effects of Husband's and Wife's Satisfaction with Household Work and Employment on Their Own and Each Other's Health. Working Paper 01-30.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Stuenkel, C.. Can commodification of household services help reduce everyday stress in working families?. National Council on Family Relations.Rochester, NY. 2001.
  • Stuenkel, C.. Getting it all done: Commodification of household services as a strategy for working families. Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.Anaheim, CA. 2001.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Imaging family roles: Parental influence on the expectations of adolescents in dual-career families. Roundtable, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.Anaheim, CA. 2001.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Imagining family roles: Parental influence on the expectations of adolescents in dual-career families. Midwest Sociological Society Annual Meeting.St. Louis, MO. 2001.
  • Weinshenker, M.. Imagining family roles: Parental influence on the expectations of adolescents in dual-career families. American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting.Seattle, WA. 2001.
  • Weinshenker, Matthew. Imagining Family Roles: Parental Influence on the Expectations of Adolescents in Dual-Career Families. Working Paper 01-04.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2001.
  • Adam, E.K.. Presider, parents, children, and work - studies from the University of Chicago Alfred P. Sloan Center. Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Adam, E.K.. Work, family, and physiological stress in mothers: Implications for health. The Effects of Work-Family Arrangements on Health and Well-Being, Roundtable session at Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons Conference.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Adam, E.K., Rosman, J.. Residential mobility, relationship instability and cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes in low-income adolescent girls. Eighth Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence.Chicago, IL. 2000.
  • Adam, Emma K.. Work, Family, and Physiological Stress in Mothers: Implications for Health. Working Paper 00-10.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Chen, Q, Luo, Y.. Time on paid work and time with children: Experience of happiness among dual-earner couples. Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Chen, Q, Luo, Y.. What matters more, jobs or children? A study of time use and experience of happiness among dual-earner couples. American Sociological Association Meetings.Washington, DC. 2000.
  • Dempsey, N.P.. The functions of television and other media in family life. Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work workshop series.Chicago, IL. 2000.
  • Dempsey, N.P.. The functions of television and other media in family life. American Sociological Association Meeting.Washington, DC. 2000.
  • Lee, Y.S., Waite, L.J.. Housework as caring: Examining feelings of being appreciated for housework. 2000 annual meeting of the Population Association of America.Los Angeles, CA. 2000.
  • Lee, Y.S., Waite, L.J.. Money and children's responsibility for the housework. American Sociological Association Meetings.Washington, DC. 2000.
  • Marchena, E.. How parents structure young children's experiences in dual-career families. Work and Family: Expanding the horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, L.J.. Marriage and childbearing attitudes in late adolescence: Exploring racial, ethnic, and gender differences. Biennial meetings of the Society for Research on Adolescence.Los Angeles, CA. 2000.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, L.J.. Marriage and childbearing attitudes in late adolescence: Exploring racial, ethnic, and gender differences. Annual meetings of the Population Association of America.Los Angeles, CA. 2000.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, L.J.. Marriage and childbearing attitudes in late adolescence: Exploring: Racial, ethnic and gender differences. Biennial meetings of the Society for Research on Adolescence.Chicago, IL. 2000.
  • Marchena, E., Waite, L.J.. Re-assessing family goals and attitudes in late adolescence: The effects of natal family experiences and early family formation. Contact Forum on Value Orientations and Life Cycle Decisions at the Royal Academy.Brussels, Belgium. 2000.
  • Marchena, Elaine. How Parents Structure Young Children's Experiences in Dual-Career Families. Working Paper 00-01.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Roney, J., Wolfe, R., Mulligan, C. B.. Methodological issues in the use of the ESM to examine working families. Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Roney, James, Wolfe, Rustin, Mulligan, Casey. Methodological Issues in the Use of the ESM to Examine Working Families. Working Paper 00-12.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Schmidt, J.A.. Daily stressors in families. Working Family Center Workshop Series.Chicago, IL. 2000.
  • Schmidt, J.A.. Daily stressors in families. Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Schmidt, Jennifer. Daily Stressors in Families. Working Paper 00-02.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Schneider, Barbara. How Teenagers Spend Their Time Outside of School: Are Parents and Their Teenagers in Agreement?. Working Paper 00-03.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Shernoff, David, Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. The Emotional and Affective Development of Adolescents from Working Families. Working Paper 00-04.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Waite, L.J., Schneider, B., Schmidt, J., Marchena, E.. Panel on University of Chicago Sloan Study of Parents, Children, and Work. Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work workshop series at the University of Chicago.Chicago, IL. 2000.
  • Zucker, P.. Quality of experience among working families. Work and Family: Expanding the Horizons.San Francisco, CA. 2000.
  • Zucker, Pamela B.. Quality of Experience Among Working Families. Working Paper 00-09.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 2000.
  • Adam, E.K.. Emotional and physiological stress in working mothers: The effects of relationship style and hours of work. Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work workshop series.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Adam, E.K.. The effects of relationship style, hours of paid work, and division of child-rearing labor on emotional and physiological stress in working mothers. Families, Employment, and Stress, Refereed Roundtable of the section on the Sociology of the Family conducted at the 94th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Adam, E.K., Tanaka, A., Alwin, J.. Emotional working models? The relations between adult attachment, parent emotion, and parenting behavior. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.Albuquerque, NM. 1999.
  • Adam, Emma K.. The Effects of Relationship Style, Hours of Paid Work, and Division of Child-Rearing Labor on Emotional and Physiological Stress in Working Mothers. Working Paper 99-04.East Lansing, MI: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Larson, Reed W., Almeida, David M.. Emotional Transmission in the Daily Lives of Families: A New Paradigm for Studying Family Process. Working Paper 99-06.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Marchena, E.. Marriage and childbearing attitudes in late adolescence: Exploring: Racial, ethnic and gender differences. Demography workshop, University of Chicago.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Mulligan, Casey B., Schneider, Barbara, Wolfe, Rustin. Time Use and Population Representation in the Sloan Study of Adolescents. Working Paper 99-12.University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Schmidt, J.A.. Adversity in middle class familes: An overlooked phenomenon. Alfred P. Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work Conference.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Schmidt, J.A., Abuhamdeh, S.. Introduction to Sloan survey data. Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work workshop series.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Schmidt, J.A, Abuhamdeh, S.. Introduction to data from the Sloan Working Family Study. Sloan Working Family Center Paper Series.Chicago, IL. 1999.
  • Schmidt, J, Hoogstra, L.. Family time: Quantity and quality of parent-adolescent interactions in two-parent working families. American Educational Research Association Meetings.Montreal, Canada. 1999.
  • Schmidt, Jennifer. Family Time: Quantity and Quality of Parent-Adolescent Interactions in Two-Parent Working Families. Working Paper 99-29.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Schneider, B.. Life in working families. Alfred P. Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work Conference.. 1999.
  • Schneider, Barbara, Abuhamdeh, Sami. The Importance of Being Alone: Mothers and Identity Formation. Working Paper 99-16.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Shernoff, David, Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. The Experience of Home and School for Working Class, Middle, and Upper Class Students. Working Paper 99-31.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Yamaguchi, Kazuo, Wang, Yantao. Gender-Role Attitude, Wives' Employment and the Household Division of Labor among American Families. Working Paper 99-10.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Zucker, Pamela. Working Managers: The Quality of Marital Interaction. Working Paper 99-00.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Work. 1999.
  • Goldstein, Jill M., Tsuang, Ming T., Faraone, Stephen V.. Gender and schizophrenia: Implications for understanding the heterogeneity of the illness. Psychiatry Research.28, (3), 243-253.1989.
    • ID: 10.1016/0165-1781(89)90205-9 (DOI)
  • Radloff, Lenore S.. Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Applied Psychological Measurement.1, (3), 385-401.1977.
    • ID: 10.1177/014662167700100306 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-02-20 | Issue Number: 8 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Schneider, Barbara; Waite, Linda J (2008): The 500 Family Study [1998-2000: United States]. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04549