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National Crime Surveys: National Sample, 1973-1983

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
1984-03-18
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics
Language
English
Free Keywords
census data; crime; criminal justice system; demographic characteristics; households; neighborhoods; residential environment; victimization
Description
  • Abstract

    The National Crime Survey (NCS), a study of personal and household victimization, measures victimization for six selected crimes, including attempts. The NCS was designed to achieve three primary objectives: to develop detailed information about the victims and consequences of crime, to estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to police, and to provide uniform measures of selected types of crime. The surveys cover the following types of crimes, including attempts: rape, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and auto or motor vehicle theft. Crimes such as murder, kidnapping, shoplifting, and gambling are not covered. Questions designed to obtain data on the characteristics and circumstances of the victimization were asked in each incident report. Items such as time and place of occurrence, injuries suffered, medical expenses incurred, number, age, race, and sex of offender(s), relationship of offender(s) to victim (stranger, casual acquaintance, relative, etc.), and other detailed data relevant to a complete description of the incident were included. Legal and technical terms, such as assault and larceny, were avoided during the interviews. Incidents were later classified in more technical terms based upon the presence or absence of certain elements. In addition, data were collected in the study to obtain information on the victims' education, migration, labor force status, occupation, and income. Full data for each year are contained in Parts 101-110. Incident-level extract files (Parts 1-10, 41) are available to provide users with files that are easy to manipulate. The incident-level datasets contain each incident record that appears in the full sample file, the victim's person record, and the victim's household information. These data include person and household information for incidents only. Subsetted person-level files also are available as Parts 50-79. All of the variables for victims are repeated for a maximum of four incidents per victim. There is one person-level subset file for each interview quarter of the complete national sample from 1973 through the second interview quarter in 1980.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: 1973, Incident Level
    • DS2: 1974, Incident Level
    • DS3: 1975, Incident Level
    • DS4: 1976, Incident Level
    • DS5: 1977, Incident Level
    • DS6: 1978, Incident Level
    • DS7: 1979, Incident Level
    • DS8: 1980, Incident Level
    • DS9: 1981, Incident Level
    • DS10: 1982, Incident Level
    • DS41: 1973-1982, Incident Level: Concatenated File
    • DS50: 1973 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS51: 1973 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS52: 1973 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS53: 1973 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS54: 1974 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS55: 1974 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS56: 1974 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS57: 1974 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS58: 1975 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS59: 1975 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS60: 1975 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS61: 1975 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS62: 1976 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS63: 1976 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS64: 1976 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS65: 1976 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS66: 1977 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS67: 1977 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS68: 1977 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS69: 1977 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS70: 1978 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS71: 1978 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS72: 1978 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS73: 1978 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS74: 1979 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS75: 1979 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS76: 1979 Person Level, Third Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS77: 1979 Person Level, Fourth Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS78: 1980 Person Level, First Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS79: 1980 Person Level, Second Interview Quarter, All Victims, 10 Percent Non-Victims, for Up to Four Incidents
    • DS101: 1973 Full File
    • DS102: 1974 Full File
    • DS103: 1975 Full File
    • DS104: 1976 Full File
    • DS105: 1977 Full File
    • DS106: 1978 Full File
    • DS107: 1979 Full File
    • DS108: 1980 Full File
    • DS109: 1981 Full File
    • DS110: 1982 Full File
    • DS111: Codebook for Full Files (1973-1976), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)(PDF)
    • DS112: Codebook for Full File (1977), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978) (PDF)
    • DS113: Codebook for Full File (1978), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978) (PDF)
    • DS114: Codebook for Full Files (1979-1980), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1979-1980) (PDF)
    • DS115: Codebook for Full Files (1981-1982) and Incident-Level Files (1973-1982) (PDF)
    • DS116: SAS Statements for Full Files (1973-1976), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS117: SAS Statements for Full File (1977), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS118: SAS Statements for Full File (1978), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS119: SAS Statements for Full Files (1979-1980), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1979-1980)
    • DS120: SAS Statements for Full Files (1981-1982) and Incident-Level Files (1973-1982)
    • DS121: SPSS Statements for Full Files (1973-1976), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS122: SPSS Statements for Full File (1977), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS123: SPSS Statements for Full File (1978), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1973-1978)
    • DS124: SPSS Statements for Full Files (1979-1980), Incident-Level (1973-1982), and Person-Level (1979-1980)
    • DS125: SPSS Statements for Full Files (1981-1982) and Incident-Level Files (1973-1982)
Temporal Coverage
  • 1973 / 1983
    Time period: 1973--1983
  • 1973 / 1983
    Collection date: 1973--1983
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Population of the United States over 12 years of age.
Sampling
A national sample of households was drawn using a stratified multistage cluster procedure. Rotating subsamples were reinterviewed at six-month intervals. Interviews were conducted with each household member over 12 years old. In generating the person-level file, a full sample of victims and a 10-percent sample of non-victims for up to four incidents were employed.
Collection Mode
  • Parts 101-110, the Full Files, are hierarchically structured into multiple levels. For the 1973-1977 files, the hierarchy comprises three levels: household, person, and incident. For the 1978-1982 files, the hierarchy consists of four levels: header record, household, person, and incident. There are 103 variables for an average of 35,000 households per quarter, 102 variables for an average of 65,000 persons per quarter, and 310 variables for an average of 8,000 incidents per quarter.

    Users should note that there is an introductory section in the documentation for this data collection that explains the hierarchical datasets, rate estimating procedures, and standard error estimating procedures. Additional information on the sample also is provided.

    The files are not numbered consecutively.

    The codebooks are provided as Portable Document Format (PDF) files. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided through the ICPSR Website on the Internet.

Note
1998-10-05 The column location of Variable 1028 has been corrected in three codebooks: (1) the codebook for full files 1973-1976, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978 (Part 111), (2) the codebook for the 1977 full file, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978 (Part 112), and (3) the codebook for the 1978 full file, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978 (Part 113). In addition, all the codebooks are now available as PDF files, and SAS and SPSS data definition statements have been added to the collection.1997-03-07 The column location of variable 1028 has been corrected in three codebooks: (1) the codebook for full files 1973-1976, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978, (2) the codebook for the 1977 full file, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978, and (3) the codebook for the 1978 full file, incident-level files 1973-1982, and person-level files 1973-1978. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics.
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 7635 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR07635.v1
Publications
  • Ansari, Sami, He, Ni. Convergence revisited: A multi-definition, multi-method analysis of the UCR and the NCVS crime series (1973-2008). Justice Quarterly.32, (1), 1-31.2015.
    • ID: 10.1080/07418825.2012.718355 (DOI)
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Rezey, Maribeth L., Heimer, Karen. Violence and economic conditions in the United States, 1973-2011: Gender, race, and ethnicity patterns in the National Crime Victimization Survey. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice.30, (1), 7-28.2014.
    • ID: 10.1177/1043986213509024 (DOI)
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Gorslavsky, Ekaterina, Heimer, Karen. Economic conditions and violent victimization trends among youth: Guns, violence, and homicide, 1973-2005. Economics and Youth Violence: Crime, Disadvantage, and Community.New York, NY: NYU Press. 2013.
  • Baumer, Eric P., Lauritsen, Janet L.. Reporting crime to the police, 1973-2005: A multivariate analysis of long-term trends in the National Crime Survey (NCS) and National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). Criminology.48, (1), 131-185.2010.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.2010.00182.x (DOI)
  • Blumstein, Alfred, Cohen, Jacqueline, Piquero, Alex R., Visher, Christy A.. Linking the crime and arrest processes to measure variations in individual arrest risk per crime (Q). Journal of Quantitative Criminology.26, (4), 533-548.2010.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10940-010-9121-7 (DOI)
  • Land, Kenneth C., Zheng, Hui. Questions about the relationship of economic conditions to violent victimization. Criminology and Public Policy.9, (4), 699-704.2010.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9133.2010.00662.x (DOI)
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Heimer, Karen. Violent victimization among males and economic conditions: The vulnerability of race and ethnic minorities. Criminology and Public Policy.9, (4), 665-692.2010.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9133.2010.00660.x (DOI)
  • Martinez, Ramiro, Jr.. Economic conditions and racial/ethnic variations in violence: Immigration, the Latino paradox, and future research. Criminology and Public Policy.9, (4), 707-713.2010.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9133.2010.00663.x (DOI)
  • Rohlfs, Chris. Does combat exposure make you a more violent or criminal person? Evidence from the Vietnam Draft. Journal of Human Resources.45, (2), 271-300.2010.
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Heimer, Karen. Gender and Violent Victimization, 1973-2005. Final Technical Report.NCJ 229133, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 2009.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/229133.pdf (URL)
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Heimer, Karen, Lynch, James P.. Trends in the gender gap in violent offending: New evidence from the National Crime Victimization Survey. Criminology.47, (2), 361-399.2009.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.2009.00149.x (DOI)
  • Schwartz, Jennifer, Steffensmeier, Darrell, Zhong, Hua, Ackerman, Jeff. Trends in the gender gap in violence: Reevaluating NCVS and other evidence. Criminology.47, (2), 401-425.2009.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.2009.00152.x (DOI)
  • Heimer, Karen, Lauritsen, Janet L.. The importance of studying trends in violence against women. Criminologist.33, (4), 1-6.2008.
  • Lauritsen, Janet L., Heimer, Karen. Gender gap in violent victimization, 1973-2004. Journal of Quantitative Criminology.24, (2), 125-147.2008.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10940-008-9041-y (DOI)
  • Xie, Min, McDowall, David. Escaping crime: The effects of direct and indirect victimization on moving. Criminology.46, (4), 809-840.2008.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.2008.00133.x (DOI)
  • CSR Incorporated. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Directory. Arlington, VA: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2007.
    • ID: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/2007DataDirectory/2007%20Data%20Directory.pdf (URL)
  • Xie, Min. Escaping crime: A multilevel analysis. American Society for Criminology.Atlanta, CA. 2007.
  • LaFree, Gary, O'Brien, Robert M., Baumer, Eric. Is the gap between Black and White arrest rates narrowing?: National trends for personal contact crimes, 1960-2002. The Many Colors of Crime: Inequalities of Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America.New York, NY: New York University Press. 2006.
  • Steffensmeier, Darrell, Zhong, Hua, Ackerman, Jeff, Schwartz, Jennifer, Agha, Suzanne. Gender gap trends for violent crimes, 1980 to 2003: A UCR-NCVS comparison. Feminist Criminology.1, (1), 72-98.2006.
    • ID: 10.1177/1557085105283953 (DOI)
  • Western, Bruce. Punishment and Inequality in America. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation. 2006.
  • Catalano, Shannan M.. An Examination of the Convergence between Police Recording and Victim Reporting of Serious Violent Crime, 1973-2002. Dissertation, University of Missouri St. Louis. 2004.
  • Donohue, John J. III, Levitt, Steven D.. Further evidence that legalized abortion lowered crime: A reply to Joyce. Journal of Human Resources.39, (1), 29-49.2004.
  • Levitt, Steven D.. Understanding why crime fell in the 1990s: Four factors that explain the decline and six that do not. Journal of Economic Perspectives.18, (1), 163-190.2004.
    • ID: 10.1257/089533004773563485 (DOI)
  • Thacher, David. The rich get richer and the poor get robbed: Inequality in U.S. criminal victimization, 1974-2000. Journal of Quantitative Criminology.20, (2), 89-116.2004.
    • ID: 10.1023/B:JOQC.0000029090.28541.4f (DOI)
  • Wheeler, Sean A.. Self-employment, criminal victimization, and community organization: Formulating effective policies for urban development. Review of Black Political Economy.29, (3), 93 -2002.
    • ID: 10.1007/BF02820710 (DOI)
  • Donohue, John J., III, Levitt, Steven D.. The impact of legalized abortion and crime. Quarterly Journal of Economics.379-420.2001.
    • ID: 10.1162/00335530151144050 (DOI)
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 1999 National Report Series: Challenging the Myths. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.NCJ 178993, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2000.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/178993.pdf (URL)
  • Levitt, Steven D.. The relationship between crime reporting and police: Implications for the use of Uniform Crime Reports. Journal of Quantitative Criminology.14, (1), 61-81.1998.
    • ID: 10.1023/A:1023096425367 (DOI)
  • Maltz, Michael D., Zawitz, Marianne W.. Displaying Violent Crime Trends Using Estimates from the National Crime Victimization Survey. Technical Report.NCJ 167881, United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1998.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/dvctue.pdf (URL)
  • Bryden, David P., Lengnick, Sonja. Rape in the criminal justice system. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.87, (4), 1194 -1997.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1144018 (URL)
  • Ellis, Desmond, DeKeseredy, Walter S.. Rethinking estrangement, interventions, and intimate femicide. Violence Against Women.3, (6), 590-609.1997.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801297003006003 (DOI)
  • Gilbert, Neil. Advocacy research and social policy. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 1997.
  • Kindermann, Charles, Lynch, James, Cantor, David. Effects of the Redesign on Victimization Estimates. National Crime Victimization Survey.NCJ 164381, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1997.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ERVE.PDF (URL)
  • Rand, Michael R., Lynch, James P., Cantor, David. Criminal Victimization, 1973-95. NCJ 163069, United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1997.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/Cv73_95.pdf (URL)
  • Sampson, Robert J., Lauritsen, Janet L.. Racial and ethnic disparities in crime and criminal justice in the United States. Crime and Justice.21, 311-374.1997.
  • Clark, Teresa J., McKenna, Laura Smith, Long, Toby. Physical therapists' recognition of battered women in clinical settings. Physical Therapy.76, (1), 12-18.1996.
  • Craven, Diane. Female Victims of Violent Crime. NCJ 162602, United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1996.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fvvc.pdf (URL)
  • Dobrin, Adam, Wiersma, Brian, Loftin, Colin, McDowall, David. Statistical Handbook on Violence in America. Phoenix: Oryx Press. 1996.
  • LaFree, Gary, Drass, Kriss A.. The effect of changes in intraracial income inequality and educational attainment on changes in arrest rates for African Americans and whites, 1957-1990. American Sociological Review.61, (4), 614-634.1996.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096396 (URL)
  • Levitt, Steven D.. The effect of prison population size on crime rates: Evidence from prison overcrowding legislation. Quarterly Journal of Economics.111, (2), 319-351.1996.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2946681 (URL)
  • Lewit, Eugene M., Baker, Linda Schuurmann. Children as victims of violence. Future of Children.6, (3), 147-156.1996.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1602602 (URL)
  • Lynch, James P.. Clarifying divergent estimates of rape from two national surveys. Public Opinion Quarterly.60, (3), 410-430.1996.
    • ID: 10.1086/297762 (DOI)
  • O'Brien, Robert M.. Police productivity and crime rates: 1973-1992. Criminology.34, (2), 183-207.1996.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.1996.tb01202.x (DOI)
  • Anonymous. Crime statistics. Congressional Digest.73, (6-7), 167 -1994.
  • Bastian, Lisa D.. Criminal Victimization in the United States, 1973-92 Trends . National Crime Victimization Survey Report.NCJ 147006, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1994.
  • Bastian, Lisa D.. Criminal Victimization in the United States: 1973-92 Trends. NCJ 147006, United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1994.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cvus-7392t.pdf (URL)
  • Bastian, Lisa D., Taylor, Bruce M.. Young Black Male Victims. NCJ 147004, United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1994.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/YGBKML.PDF (URL)
  • Bureau of Justice Statistics. Violent Crime. Bureau of Justice Statistics Selected Findings.NCJ 147486, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1994.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/VIOCRM.PDF (URL)
  • Anonymous. Crime: Less of it about. Economist.329, (7837), 33 -1993.
  • Bachman, Ronet. Double-edged sword of violent victimization against the elderly. Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect.5, (4), 59-76.1993.
    • ID: 10.1300/J084v05n04_05 (DOI)
  • Davis, Robert. Criminals have hurt 37 million since '73. USA Today.A5 -1993.
  • Smith, M. Dwayne, Kuchta, Ellen S.. Trends in Violent Crime against Women, 1973-1989. Social Science Quarterly.74, (1), 28-45.1993.
  • Steffensmeier, Darrell J., Harer, Miles D.. Bulging prisons, an aging U.S. population, and the nation's violent crime rate. Federal Probation.57, (2), 3-10.1993.
  • Zawitz, Marianne W., Klaus, Patsy A., Bachman, Ronet, Bastian, Lisa D., DeBerry, Marshall M., Jr., Rand, Michael R., Taylor, Bruce M.. Highlights from 20 Years of Surveying Crime Victims: The National Crime Victimization Survey, 1973-92. NCJ 144525, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1993.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/bjs/144525.pdf (URL)
  • Bachman, Ronet. Crime in nonmetropolitan America: A national accounting of trends, incidence rates, and idiosyncratic vulnerabilities. Rural Sociology.57, (4), 546-560.1992.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1549-0831.1992.tb00479.x (DOI)
  • Bachman, Ronet. Crime victimization in City, Suburban, and Rural areas. National Crime Victimization Survey Report.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1992.
  • McDowall, David, Loftin, Colin. Comparing the UCR and NCS Over Time. Criminology.30, (1), 125-132.1992.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.1992.tb01097.x (DOI)
  • Warner, Barbara D.. The reporting of crime: a missing link in conflict theory. Social Threat and Social Control.Albany: State University of New York Press. 1992.
  • Blumstein, Alfred, Cohen, Jacqueline, Rosenfeld, Richard. Trend and deviation in crime rates: A comparison of UCR and NCS data for burglary and robbery. Criminology.29, (2), 237-263.1991.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.1991.tb01066.x (DOI)
  • Cook, Philip J.. The technology of personal violence. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 1991.
  • Harlow, Caroline Wolf. Female Victims of Violent Crime. NCJ 126826, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1991.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fvvc.pdf (URL)
  • Johnson, Joan M.. Criminal Victimization in the United States, 1973-88 Trends. A National Crime Survey Report.NCJ 129392, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1991.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cvus-7388t.pdf (URL)
  • Parker, Robert Nash, Smith, William R., Smith, D. Randall, et al. Trends in victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974-1981. Journal of Quantitative Criminology.7, (1), 3-17.1991.
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  • Stasny, Elizabeth A.. Hierarchical models for the probabilities of a survey classification and nonresponse: An example from the National Crime Survey. Journal of the American Statistical Association.86, (414), 296-303.1991.
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  • Steffensmeier, Darrell J., Harer, Miles D.. Did crime rise or fall during the Reagan presidency? The effects of an 'aging' U.S. population on the nation's crime rate. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.28, (3), 330-359.1991.
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  • Whitaker, Catherine J., Bastian, Lisa D.. Teenage Victims. National Crime Survey Report.NCJ 128129, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1991.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/tv-ncsr91.pdf (URL)
  • Bastian, Lisa D.. Hispanic Victims, Special Report. NCJ 120507, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1990.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/hv.pdf (URL)
  • Garofalo, James. The National Crime Survey, 1973-1986: Strengths and limitations of a very large data set. Measuring Crime: Large-Scale, Long-Range Efforts.Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. 1990.
  • MacKenzie, Doris Layton, Baunach, Phyllis Jo, Roberg, Roy R.. Measuring Crime: Large-Scale, Long-Range Efforts. SUNY Series in Critical Issues in Criminal Justice.Albany: State University of New York Press. 1990.
  • O'Brien, Robert M.. Comparing detrended UCR and NCS crime rates over time: 1973-1986. Journal of Criminal Justice.18, (3), 229-238.1990.
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Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 16 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics (1984): National Crime Surveys: National Sample, 1973-1983. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07635