My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Drug Use Forecasting in 24 Cities in the United States, 1987-1997

Version
v2
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data, clinical data, and administrative records data
Creator
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Other Title
  • Version 2 (Subtitle)
Collective Title
  • Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) Program/Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Series
Publication Date
1991-03-05
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
ADAM/DUF Program; alcohol abuse; criminal histories; crime patterns; demographic characteristics; drug dependence; drug law offenses; drug offenders; drug related crimes; drug testing; drug use; gun use; handguns; recidivism prediction; substance abuse; trends; urinalysis
Description
  • Abstract

    The Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Program measures levels of and trends in drug use among persons arrested and booked in the United States. The data address the following topics: (1) types of drugs used by arrestees (based on self-reports and urinalysis), (2) self-reported dependency on drugs, (3) self-reported need for alcohol/drug treatment, (4) the relationship between drug use and certain types of offenses, and (5) the relationship between self-reported indicators of drug use and indicators of drug use based on urinalysis. Participation in the project is voluntary, and all information collected from the arrestees is anonymous and confidential. The data include the arrestee's age, race, gender, educational attainment, marital status, and the charge at the time of booking. The recently modified DUF interview instrument (used for part of the 1995 data and all of the 1996 and 1997 data) also collected information about the arrestee's use of 15 drugs, including recent and past use (e.g., 3-day and 30-day drug use) of each of these drugs, age at first use, and whether the arrestee had ever been dependent on drugs. In the original DUF interview instrument (used for the 1987 to 1994 data and part of the 1995 data), the information collected was the same as above except that the use of 22 drugs was queried, and the age at which the arrestee first became dependent on the drug was included. Arrestees also were questioned in the original instrument about their history of intravenous drug use, whether the consideration of AIDS influenced whether they shared needles, history of drug and alcohol treatment, their past and current drug treatment needs, and how many persons they had sex with during the past 12 months. Finally, arrestees were asked to provide a urine specimen, which was screened for the presence of ten drugs, including marijuana, opiates, cocaine, PCP, methadone, benzodiazepines (Valium), methaqualone, propoxyphene (Darvon), barbiturates, and amphetamines (positive test results for amphetamines were confirmed by gas chromatography). The Gun Addendum Data (Parts 27, 35, and 37) contain variables on topics such as arrestees' encounters with guns, whether they agreed or disagreed with statements about guns, gun possession, how they obtained handgun(s), whether they were armed with a gun at their arrest or during crimes, and if they had ever used a gun against another person. The Heroin Addendum Data, 1995 (Part 29) contains information that was formerly covered in the main annual file in 1992-1994, but in 1995 was revised and prepared as a separate dataset.
  • Abstract

    The Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Program was designed to estimate the prevalence of drug use among persons in the United States who are arrested and booked, and to detect changes in trends in drug use among this population. Research addressing the prevalence of drug use typically does not include the population of offenders and therefore may underestimate levels of drug use in the United States. The DUF program makes an important contribution to research on the prevalence of drug use by sampling persons who are not sampled by other surveys of drug use. Moreover, the DUF data provide important information that may be used by law enforcement and drug treatment officials to allocate resources, design prevention strategies, and gauge the impact of local efforts to reduce drug use. The following is a sample of the questions addressed by the data: What types of drugs do arrestees use? Among arrestees reporting drug use, how many report that they are dependent on drugs? To what extent do arrestees report a need for alcohol/drug treatment? Is the likelihood of drug use greater for persons arrested for certain types of offenses? Finally, what is the relationship between self-reported drug use and indicators of drug use based on urinalysis?
  • Abstract

    The DUF program is a nonexperimental survey of drug use among arrestees. In addition to supplying information on self-reported drug use, at the conclusion of the interview arrestees are asked to provide a urine specimen which is screened for the presence of ten illicit drugs. Between 1987 and 1997 the DUF program has collected information about drug use among arrestees in 24 sites across the United States, although the number of data collection sites varies slightly from year to year (see the description of the sample below). Samples of arrestees for the DUF program are drawn from booking facilities within each of the following sites and thus are limited to the types of arrestees booked at these facilities. In 11 sites (Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Kansas City, Omaha, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Washington, DC), the catchment area represents the central city (Kansas City ceased being a DUF site after 1992). In ten additional sites (Dallas, Ft. Lauderdale, Indianapolis, Miami, New Orleans, Manhattan [New York City], Phoenix, Portland, San Antonio, and San Jose), the catchment area is the county, parish, or borough. The city of Denver is Denver County and its entirety, and the city of St. Louis is also a county. The catchment area for Los Angeles includes part of the city and part of the county, and in Birmingham and San Diego the catchment area includes the entire central city and part of the county. Each quarter, trained local staff at these sites obtain voluntary and anonymous urine specimens from detained arrestees who have been in a booking facility for not more than 48 hours. The number of persons interviewed and the demographic composition of those interviewed varies somewhat across the 24 sites that have participated in the DUF program. On average, each site attempts to obtain a sample of 225 adult males per quarter. Data are collected from about 100 adult females each quarter at 21 of the 24 sites. Each quarter, 12 sites collect data from juvenile males and 8 collect data from juvenile females. Sites in which juveniles are interviewed attempt to obtain samples of 100 boys and 100 girls, although in many sites these quotas are not met due to the small number of juvenile arrestees from which to draw samples. The following procedures govern data collection in the DUF program. Male arrestees are selected by charge according to the following order of priority: (1) nondrug felony charges, (2) nondrug misdemeanor charges, (3) drug felony charges, and (4) drug misdemeanor charges. Males arrested for the following minor offenses are not sampled: vagrancy, loitering, or traffic violations (including driving while intoxicated). An exception to these general procedures is Omaha, where all arrestees are surveyed. In order to obtain a sufficient sample of adult female arrestees and juvenile arrestees, all adult female arrestees and all juvenile male and female arrestees are surveyed regardless of the nature of the crime for which they have been arrested. Individuals arrested on new charges who also have outstanding warrants are selected only on the basis of the new charge's position in the priority list, and the outstanding warrants are not considered. In addition to these selection criteria, sites are requested to survey no more than 20 percent of adult males arrested for drug offenses. To remain within the limit, the proportion of drug offenders interviewed is calculated each evening of data collection.
  • Abstract

    The data include the age, race, sex, educational attainment, marital status, employment status, and living circumstances of a sample of persons arrested and booked in the United States. The recently modified DUF interview instrument (used for part of the 1995 data and all of the 1996 and 1997 data), also included detailed questions about each arrestee's self-reported use of 15 drugs. The original DUF interview instrument (used for the 1987 to 1994 data and part of the 1995 data) elicited information about the use of 22 drugs and the age at which the arrestee first became dependent on the drug. For each drug type, arrestees were asked whether they had ever used the drug, the age at which they first used the drug, whether they had used the drug within the past three days, how many days they had used the drug with the past month, whether they had ever needed or felt dependent on the drug, and whether they were dependent on the drug at the time of the interview. Data from the new interview instrument also include information about whether arrestees had ever injected drugs and whether they were influenced by drugs when the police said they committed the crimes for which they were arrested. The data also include information about whether the arrestee had been to an emergency room for drug-related incidents and whether he or she had prior arrests in the last 12 months. Data from the DUF original interview instrument also include information about arrestees' preferred method for using cocaine, how much money arrestees spend on drugs in an average week, how many persons they had sex with during the past 12 months, whether they ever injected drugs, whether they injected drugs within the past six months, whether they ever shared needles, whether they shared needles within the past six months, and whether the consideration of AIDS influenced whether they shared needles. Data from both versions of the DUF interview provide information about each arrestee's history of drug/alcohol treatment, including whether they ever received drug/alcohol treatment and whether they needed drug/alcohol treatment. In addition to the survey, a urine specimen provided by the arrestee was screened (by the drug testing system EMIT) for the following ten drug types: marijuana, opiates, cocaine, PCP, methadone, benzodiazepines (Valium), methaqualone, propoxyphene (Darvon), barbiturates, and amphetamines. All positive results for amphetamines were confirmed by gas chromatography to eliminate positives that may be caused by over-the-counter drugs. Finally, the following variables included in the data were collected for use by local law enforcement officials at each site: precinct (precinct of arrest) and law (penal law code associated with the crime for which the subject was arrested). The Gun Addendum Data (Parts 27, 35, and 37) contain variables on topics such as arrestees' encounters with guns, whether they agreed or disagreed with statements about guns, gun possession, how they obtained handgun(s), whether they were armed with a gun at their arrest or during crimes, and if they had ever used a gun against another person. The Heroin Addendum Data, 1995 (Part 29), contains information that was formerly covered in the main annual file in 1992-1994, but in 1995 was revised and prepared as a separate dataset.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: None.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Approximately 90 percent of eligible arrestees agreed to be interviewed. Of those who consented to the interview, approximately 80 percent provided a urine specimen. The dataset includes only those persons who both agreed to be interviewed and provided a urine specimen.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Male and Female Arrestees Data, November 1987-December 1988
    • DS2: SPSS Export File for Male and Female Arrestees Data, November 1987-December 1988
    • DS3: Male and Female Arrestees Data, 1989
    • DS4: SAS Data Definition Statements for Male and Female Arrestees Data, November 1987-December 1988
    • DS5: SAS Data Definition Statements for Male and Female Arrestees Data, 1989
    • DS6: Male and Female Arrestees Data, June-December 1987
    • DS7: SAS Data Definition Statements for Male and Female Arrestees Data, June-December 1987
    • DS8: Male and Female Arrestees Data, 1990
    • DS9: SPSS Export File for Male and Female Arrestees Data, 1990
    • DS10: SAS Data Definition Statements for Male and Female Arrestees Data, 1990
    • DS11: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1991
    • DS12: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1991
    • DS13: SAS Data Definition Statements for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1991
    • DS14: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1992
    • DS15: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1992
    • DS16: SAS Data Definition Statements for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1992
    • DS17: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1993
    • DS18: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1993
    • DS19: SAS Data Definition Statements for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1993
    • DS20: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1994
    • DS21: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1994
    • DS22: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, Part 1 Survey, 1995
    • DS23: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, Part 1 Survey, 1995
    • DS24: Data Collection Instrument for 1994 Data, Part 1 Survey Data, 1995, and Heroin Addendum Data, 1995 (PDF)
    • DS25: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, Part 2 Survey, 1995
    • DS26: SPSS Export File for Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, Part 2 Survey, 1995
    • DS27: Gun Addendum Data, 1995
    • DS28: SPSS Export File for Gun Addendum Data, 1995
    • DS29: Heroin Addendum Data, 1995
    • DS30: SPSS Export File for Heroin Addendum Data, 1995
    • DS31: Codebook for Gun Addendum Data and Heroin Addendum Data, 1995
    • DS32: Data Collection Instrument for Part 2 Survey, 1995, and Gun Addendum Data, 1995 (PDF)
    • DS33: User Guide for All 1995 Data
    • DS34: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1996
    • DS35: Gun Addendum Data, 1996
    • DS36: Adult and Juvenile Arrestees Data, 1997
    • DS37: Gun Addendum Data, 1997
Temporal Coverage
  • 1987-06 / 1997-12
    Time period: 1987-06--1997-12
  • 1987-06 / 1997-12
    Collection date: 1987-06--1997-12
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Booked arrestees in 24 sites in the United States.
Sampling
The data were collected from booked arrestees as follows. 1987 data: 2,993 males at 11 sites, 516 females at 5 sites. 1988 data: 10,554 males at 20 sites, 3,261 females at 14 sites. 1989 data: 16,186 males and 5,804 females at 21 sites. 1990 data: 20,556 males at 23 sites, 7,769 females at 21 sites. 1991 data: 22,335 adult males at 24 sites, 8,330 adult females at 21 sites. 1992 data: 22,265 adult males at 24 sites, 8,322 adult females at 21 sites. 1993 data: 20,551 adult males at 23 sites, 8,139 adult females at 21 sites. 1994 data: 20,015 adult males at 23 sites, 7,839 adult females at 21 sites, 4,558 juvenile males at 12 sites, 734 juvenile females at 8 sites. Part 1 Survey, 1995, data: 11,374 adult males at 23 sites, 4,474 adult females at 21 sites, 2,483 juvenile males at 12 sites, 412 juvenile females at 7 sites. Part 2 Survey, 1995, data: 9,364 adult males at 22 sites, 3,592 adult females at 20 sites, 1,810 juvenile males at 10 sites, 242 juvenile females at 5 sites. 1996 data: 19,835 adult males at 23 sites, 7,532 adult females at 21 sites, 4,145 juvenile males at 12 sites, 645 juvenile females at 7 sites. 1997 data: 19,736 adult males at 23 sites, 7,547 adult females at 21 sites, 3,686 juvenile males at 12 sites, 647 juvenile females at 8 sites.
Collection Mode
  • (1) SPSS export files are available for all data files except Parts 3 and 6. (2) The codebooks for the 1996 and 1997 data and the data collection instruments for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997 are provided as Portable Document Format (PDF) files. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided in the README file on the diskette version of this study for the years 1987-1995 and through the ICPSR Website on the Internet. (3) The data collection instruments for 1987-1993 are available only in hardcopy form upon request from ICPSR. (4) In response to recommendations by the Government Accounting Office (GAO), significant modifications were made to the DUF survey instrument midway through 1995, resulting in two different survey instruments used that year. The new survey instrument (1995 Survey, Part 2) retains many of the variables from the original DUF questionnaire (1995 Survey, Part 1), as well as adding more detailed questions. (5) In efforts to make the DUF data more "user friendly," the coding scheme and formatting of the 1994 data and 1995 Survey, Part 1, data were changed slightly from previous years and, further, the coding scheme and formatting of the 1995 Survey, Part 2, data differ somewhat from the 1994 and 1995 Survey, Part 1, data.

Note
1998-07-15 Data for this collection have been transferred to the NACJD Private Use/Restricted Access Archive. Users interested in obtaining the data should refer to the RESTRICTIONS statement in this data collection description. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (OJP-89-C-008).
Availability
Download
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 9477 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is new version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR09477.v1
Publications
  • Kremling, Janine. An Analysis of the Influence of Sampling Methods on Estimation of Drug Use Prevalence and Patterns among Arrestees in the United States: Implications for Research and Policy. Dissertation, University of South Florida. 2010.
  • Dobkin, Carlos, Nicosia, Nancy. The war on drugs: Methamphetamine, public health, and crime. American Economic Review.99, (1), 324-349.2009.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.99.1.324 (DOI)
  • Kleck, Gary, Wang, Shun-Yung Kevin. The Myth of Big-Time Gun Trafficking and the Overintrepretation of Gun Tracing Data. UCLA Law Review.56, (5), 1233-1294.2009.
  • The White House. National Drug Control Strategy. Data Supplement 2008.NCJ 221951, Washington, DC: Office of National Drug Control Policy. 2008.
    • ID: http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/policy/ndcs08_data_supl/ndcs_suppl08.pdf (URL)
  • Gorman, Dennis M., Huber, J. Charles, Jr.. Do medical cannabis laws encourage cannabis use?. International Journal of Drug Policy.18, (3), 160-167.2007.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2006.10.001 (DOI)
  • Valdez, Avelardo, Kaplan, Charles D., Curtis, Russell L., Jr.. Aggressive crime, alcohol and drug use, and concentrated poverty in 24 U.S. urban areas. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.33, (4), 595-603.2007.
    • ID: 10.1080/00952990701407637 (DOI)
  • Ren, Ling. Rethinking the Crime Drop in the United States During the 1990s: An Examination of Competing Theoretical Perspectives. Dissertation, University of Nebraska at Omaha. 2006.
  • Reuter, Peter. Drug Use. Gender Issues.23, (3), 65 -2006.
    • ID: 10.1007/BF03186778 (DOI)
  • DeSimone, Jeff. Needle exchange programs and drug injection behavior. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.24, (3), 559-577.2005.
    • ID: 10.1002/pam.20115 (DOI)
  • Durrah, Tracy L.. Correlates of daily smoking among female arrestees in New York City and Los Angeles, 1997. American Journal of Public Health.95, (10), 1788-1792.2005.
    • ID: 10.2105/AJPH.2004.056457 (DOI)
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. The new heroin users among Manhattan arrestees: Variations by race/ethnicity and mode of consumption. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.37, (1), 51-61.2005.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.2005.10399748 (DOI)
  • Golub, Andrew, Liberty, Hillary James, Johnson, Bruce D.. Inaccuracies in self-reports and urinalysis tests: Impacts on monitoring marijuana use trends among arrestees. Journal of Drug Issues.35, (4), 941-965.2005.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260503500413 (DOI)
  • Jones, Peter R.. Drug use trends across the DUF/ADAM divide: 1988-2002. Boston, MA. 2005.
  • Rosenfeld, Richard, Fornango, Robert, Baumer, Eric. Did Ceasefire, Compstat, and Exile reduce homicide?. Criminology and Public Policy.4, (3), 419-450.2005.
  • Bliss, Meredith L.. Changes in Indicators of Methamphetamine Use and Property Crime Rates in Oregon. Salem, OR: Oregon Criminal Justice Commission. 2004.
    • ID: http://cms.oregon.gov/cjc/docs/methpropcrime1996_20041007.pdf (URL)
  • Durrah, Tracy L., Rosenberg, Terry J.. Smoking among female arrestees: Prevalence of daily smoking and smoking cessation efforts. Addictive Behaviors.29, (5), 1015-1019.2004.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2004.02.052 (DOI)
  • Fiscella, Kevin, Pless, Naomi, Meldrum, Sean, Fiscella Paul. Alcohol and opiate withdrawal in US jails. American Journal of Public Health.94, (9), 1522-1525.2004.
    • ID: 10.2105/AJPH.94.9.1522 (DOI)
  • Marcelli, Enrico A.. Drug-related and economic crime among unauthorized Latino immigrant and other arrestees in California. Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice.2, (3), 23 -2004.
    • ID: 10.1300/J222v02n03_03 (DOI)
  • Martin, Susan E., Maxwell, Christopher D., White, Helene R., Zhang, Yan. Trends in alcohol use, cocaine use, and crime: 1989-1998. Journal of Drug Issues.34, (2), 333-360.2004.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260403400205 (DOI)
  • Sloan, John J., lll, Bodapati, Madhava, R., Tucker, Tanya A.. Respondent misreporting of drug use in self-reports: Social desirability and other correlates. Journal of Drug Issues.34, (2), 269-293.2004.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260403400202 (DOI)
  • Steinberg, Jane Karen. Correlates of Drug Use and Prior Arrest in a Sample of California Arrestees. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles. 2004.
  • Herz, Denise C., Murray, Rebecca. Exploring arrestee drug use in rural Nebraska. Journal of Drug Issues.33, (1), 99-118.2003.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260303300105 (DOI)
  • Lo, Celia C.. An application of social conflict theory to arrestees' use of cocaine and opiates. Journal of Drug Issues.33, (1), 237-266.2003.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260303300110 (DOI)
  • MacCoun, Robert, Kilmer, Beau, Reuter, Peter. Research on Drugs-Crime Linkages: The Next Generation. NIJ Special Report.. 2003.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/194616c.pdf (URL)
  • Pacula, Rosalie L., Kilmer, Beau. Marijuana and Crime: Is There a Connection Beyond Prohibition?. NBER Working Paper Series.10046, Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. 2003.
    • ID: http://www.nber.org/papers/w10046 (URL)
  • Stolzenberg, Lisa, D'Alessio, Stewart J.. A multilevel analysis of the effect of cocaine price on cocaine use among arrestees. Journal of Criminal Justice.31, (2), 185-195.2003.
    • ID: 10.1016/S0047-2352(02)00224-6 (DOI)
  • Taylor, Bruce, Brownstein, Henry H.. Toward the operationalization of drug market stability: An illustration using arrestee data from crack cocaine markets in four urban communities. Journal of Drug Issues.33, (1), 73-99.2003.
    • ID: 10.1177/002204260303300104 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Correlates of Benzodiazepine use among a sample of arrestees surveyed through the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program. Substance Use and Misuse.38, (1), 127-139.2003.
    • ID: 10.1081/JA-120016569 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Exploring the relationship between race and the use of cocaine: A temporal examination of Houston arrestees. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse.2, (1), 67-83.2003.
    • ID: 10.1300/J233v02n01_06 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., VanderWall, Kristine L., Johnson, Regina J., Urbach, Blake J., Peters, Ronald J.. Comparing the validity of self-reported recent drug use between adult and juvenile arrestees. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.35, (2), 279-284.2003.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.2003.10400010 (DOI)
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. Substance use progression and hard drug use in inner-city New York. Stages and Pathways of Drug Involvement: Examining the Gateway Hypothesis.Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2002.
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. The misuse of the 'Gateway Theory' in US policy on drug abuse control: A secondary analysis of the muddled deduction. International Journal of Drug Policy.13, (1), 5-19.2002.
    • ID: 10.1016/S0955-3959(01)00111-6 (DOI)
  • Hammett, Theodore M., Harmon, Mary Patricia, Rhodes, William. The burden of infectious disease among inmates of and releasees from United States Correctional facilities, 1997. American Journal of Public Health.92, (11), 1789-1794.2002.
    • ID: 10.2105/AJPH.92.11.1789 (DOI)
  • Kim, Julia Yun Soo, Fendrich, Michael. Gender differences in juvenile arrestees' drug use, self-reported dependence, and perceived need for treatment. Psychiatric Services.53, (1), 70-75.2002.
    • ID: 10.1176/appi.ps.53.1.70 (DOI)
  • Peters, Ronald J., Jr., Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Baumler, Elizabeth R., Ross, Michael W., Johnson, Regina L.. Heroin use among southern arrestees: Regional findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program. Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling.22, (2), 50-60.2002.
  • Yacoubian, George S.. Exploring benzodiazepine use among Houston arrestees. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.34, (4), 393-399.2002.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.2002.10399980 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Urbach, Blake J.. A comparison of drug use between welfare-receiving arrestees and non-welfare-receiving arrestees. Health and Social Work.27, (3), 230-233.2002.
    • ID: 10.1093/hsw/27.3.230 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Urbach, B. J.. To pee or not to pee: Reconsidering the need for urinalysis. Journal of Drug Education.32, (4), 261-270.2002.
    • ID: 10.2190/FAW4-6GNP-Q6N7-V5MB (DOI)
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. Monitoring the Marijuana Upsurge With DUF/ADAM Arrestees, Final Report. NCJ 188867, Washington, DC: National Development and Research Institutes. 2001.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/188867.pdf (URL)
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. The Rise of Marijuana as the Drug of Choice Among Youthful Adult Arrestees. Research in Brief.NCJ 187490, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 2001.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/187490.pdf (URL)
  • Johnson, Regina J., Baumler, Elizabeth R., Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Peters, Ronald J., Jr., Ross, Michael W.. A longitudinal analysis of drug use reporting among Houston arrestees. Journal of Drug Issues.31, (3), 757-766.2001.
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Assessing the temporal stability of drug-using classifications: An examination of Washington, D.C. arrestees between 1990 and 1997. Journal of Criminal Justice.29, (1), 21-30.2001.
    • ID: 10.1016/S0047-2352(00)00073-8 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Exploring the temporal validity of self-reported marijuana use among juvenile arrestees. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education.46, (3), 34-42.2001.
  • DeJong, Christina, Wish, Eric D.. Is it advisable to urine test arrestees to assess risk of rearrest? A comparison of self-report and urinalysis-based measures of drug use. Journal of Drug Issues.30, (1), 133-146.2000.
  • Decker, Scott H.. Legitimating drug use: A note on the impact of gang membership and drug sales on the use of illicit drugs. Justice Quarterly.17, (2), 393-410.2000.
    • ID: 10.1080/07418820000096381 (DOI)
  • Jacobs, Bruce A., Volkan, Topalli, Wright, Richard. Managing retaliation: Drug robbery and informal sanction threats. Criminology.38, (1), 171-197.2000.
    • ID: 10.1111/j.1745-9125.2000.tb00887.x (DOI)
  • Kim, Julia Yun Soo, Fendrich, Michael, Wislar, Joseph S.. The validity of juvenile arrestees' drug use reporting: A gender comparison. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.37, (4), 419-432.2000.
    • ID: 10.1177/0022427800037004004 (DOI)
  • White, Helene Raskin, Gorman, D.M.. Dynamics of the drug-crime relationship. Criminal Justice 2000.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. 2000.
    • ID: http://www.drugslibrary.stir.ac.uk/documents/02d.pdf (URL)
  • Wish, Eric D., Gray, Thomas, Sushinsky, Jonathan, Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Fitzgerald, Nora. An Experiment to Enhance the Reporting of Drug Use by Arrestees. Journal of Drug Issues.30, 55-76.2000.
  • Wislar, Joseph S., Fendrich, Michael. Can self-reported drug use data be used to assess sex risk behavior in adolescents?. Archives of Sexual Behavior.29, (1), 77-89.2000.
    • ID: 10.1023/A:1001838605520 (DOI)
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Assessing ADAM's domain: Past problems and future prospects. Contemporary Drug Problems.27, (1), 121-135.2000.
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr.. Reassessing the need for urinalysis as a validation technique. Journal of Drug Issues.30, (2), 323-334.2000.
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Urbach, Blake J., Larsen, Kristine L., Johnson, Regina J., Peters, Ronald J.. A comparison of drug use between prostitutes and other female arrestees. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education.46, (2), 12-25.2000.
  • Bowling, Benjamin. The rise and fall of New York murder: Zero tolerance or crack's decline?. British Journal of Criminology.39, (4), 531-554.1999.
    • ID: 10.1093/bjc/39.4.531 (DOI)
  • Carpenter, Catherine L., Longshore, Douglas, Annon, Kiku, Annon, Jeffrey J., Anglin, M. Douglas. Prevalence of HIV-1 Among Recent Arrestees in Los Angeles County, California: Serial Cross-Sectional Study, 1991 to 1995. JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.21, (2), 172-177.1999.
  • Fendrich, Michael, Johnson, Timothy, Shaligram, Chithra, et al. The impact of interviewer characteristics on drug use reporting by male juvenile arrestees. Journal of Drug Issues.29, (1), 37-58.1999.
  • Golub, Andrew Lang, Johnson, Bruce D.. Cohort changes in illegal drug use among arrestees in Manhattan: From the heroin injection generation to the Blunts generation. Substance Use and Misuse.34, (13), 1733-1763.1999.
    • ID: 10.3109/10826089909039425 (DOI)
  • Jacobs, Bruce A.. Crack to heroin? Drug markets and transition. British Journal of Criminology.39, (4), 555-574.1999.
    • ID: 10.1093/bjc/39.4.555 (DOI)
  • Pennell, Susan, Ellett, Joe, Rienick, Cynthia, Grimes, Jackie. Meth Matters: Report on Methamphetamine Users in Five Western Cities. Research Report.NCJ 176331, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. 1999.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/176331.pdf (URL)
  • Rosenfeld, Richard, Decker, Scott H.. Are arrest statistics a valid measure of illicit drug use? The relationship between criminal justice and public health indicators of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana use. Justice Quarterly.16, (3), 685-699.1999.
    • ID: 10.1080/07418829900094311 (DOI)
  • Speiglman, Richard, Green, Rex S.. Homeless and Non-Homeless Arrestees: Distinctions in Prevalence and in Sociodemographic, Drug Use, and Arrest Characteristics Across DUF Sites. NCJ 193805, Berkeley, CA: Public Health Institute. 1999.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/193805.pdf (URL)
  • Taylor, Bruce, Bennett, Trevor. Comparing Drug Use Rates of Detained Arrestees in the United States and England, Research Report. Research Report.NCJ 175052, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1999.
  • Yacoubian, George S.. A drug use typology for treatment intervention. Western Criminology Review.1, (2), 1999.
  • Zhang, Zhiwei, Gerstein, Dean R.. Deviance disavowal, interviewer role, social interactions, and underreporting in a drug use survey. Proceedings of the Survey Research Methods Section.Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association. 1999.
    • ID: http://www.amstat.org/Sections/Srms/Proceedings/papers/1999_153.pdf (URL)
  • (author unknown). 1997 Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees. National Institute of Justice.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1998.
  • (author unknown). ADAM (Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program) 1997: Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees, Research Report. NCJ 171672, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1998.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/nij/textrev.pdf (URL)
  • Baumer, Eric, Lauritsen, Janet L., Rosenfeld, Richard, Wright, Richard. The influence of crack cocaine on robbery, burglary, and homicide rates: A cross-city, longitudinal analysis. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.35, (3), 316-340.1998.
    • ID: 10.1177/0022427898035003004 (DOI)
  • Baumer, Terry L.. Assessing the need for treatment in the arrestee population. Journal of Crime and Justice.21, (2), 173-190.1998.
    • ID: 10.1080/0735648X.1998.9721606 (DOI)
  • Henson, Kevin D., Longshore, Douglas, Kowalewski, Mark R., Anglin, M. Douglas, Annon, Kiku. Perceived AIDS risk among adult arrestee injection drug users in Los Angeles County. AIDS Education and Prevention.10, (5), 447-464.1998.
  • Johnson, Bruce D., Thomas, George, Golub, Andrew. Trends in heroin use among Manhattan arrestees from the heroin and crack eras. Heroin in the Age of Crack-Cocaine.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 1998.
  • Lo, Celia C., Garland, T. Neal. The Relationship Between Onset Age of Drinking and Delinquency: A Comparison of Data from the National Household Survey and the Drug Use Forecasting Survey. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology.Washington, DC. 1998.
  • Longshore, Douglas, Grills, Cheryl, Anglin, M. Douglas, Annon, Kiku. Treatment motivation among African American drug-using arrestees. Journal of Black Psychology.24, (2), 126-144.1998.
    • ID: 10.1177/00957984980242004 (DOI)
  • Riley, K. Jack. Homicide and drugs: A tale of six cities. Homicide Studies.2, (2), 176-205.1998.
    • ID: 10.1177/1088767998002002005 (DOI)
  • Wren, Christopher S.. Heroin Use Seen Declining Among Young Suspected Offenders in Manhattan. New York Times.(B), 5 -1998.
  • Yacoubian, George S., Jr., Kane, Robert J.. Identifying a drug use typology of Philadelphia arrestees: A cluster analysis. Journal of Drug Issues.28, (2), 559-574.1998.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting 1996: Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees, Research Report. NCJ 165691, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1997.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/165691.pdf (URL)
  • Chen, Huey-Tsyh, Stephens, Robert C., Cochran, Deborah C., Huff, Heather K.. Problems and solutions for estimating the prevalence of drug abuse among arrestees. Journal of Drug Issues.27, (4), 689-701.1997.
  • Decker, Scott H., Pennell, Susan, Caldwell, Ami. Illegal Firearms: Access and Use by Arrestees. Research in Brief.NCJ 163496, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1997.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/163496.pdf (URL)
  • Golub, Andrew, Johnson, Bruce D.. Crack's Decline: Some Surprises Across U.S. Cities. National Institute of Justice Research in Brief.NCJ 165707, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. 1997.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/165707.pdf (URL)
  • Katz, Charles M., Webb, Vincent J., Gartin, Patrick R., et al. The validity of self-reported marijuana and cocaine use. Journal of Criminal Justice.25, (1), 31-41.1997.
    • ID: 10.1016/S0047-2352(96)00049-9 (DOI)
  • Kurst-Swanger, Karel A.. The Drug Control Debate: A Comparison of Urban Policies and Results. Dissertation, State University of New York at Binghamton. 1997.
  • Longshore, Douglas. Treatment motivation among Mexican American drug-using arrestees. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences.19, (2), 214-229.1997.
    • ID: 10.1177/07399863970192008 (DOI)
  • Longshore, Douglas, Grills, Cheryl, Anglin, M. Douglas, Annon, Kiku. Desire for help among African-American drug users. Journal of Drug Issues.27, (4), 755-770.1997.
  • Valdez, Avelardo, Yin, Zenong, Kaplan, Charles D.. A comparison of alcohol, drugs, and aggressive crime among Mexican-American, Black, and White male arrestees in Texas. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.23, (2), 249-265.1997.
    • ID: 10.3109/00952999709040945 (DOI)
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting 1995: Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees, Research Report. NCJ 161721, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1996.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/duf1995.pdf (URL)
  • Dobrin, Adam, Wiersma, Brian, Loftin, Colin, McDowall, David. Statistical Handbook on Violence in America. Phoenix: Oryx Press. 1996.
  • Feucht, T.E., Kyle, G.M.. Methamphetamine Use Among Adult Arrestees: Findings from the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Program. Research in Brief.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1996.
  • Golub, Andrew Lang, Hakeem, Farrukh, Johnson, Bruce D.. Monitoring the Decline in the Crack Epidemic with Data from the Drug Use Forecasting Program. Drug Use Forecasting Site Directors' Meeting.Washington, DC. 1996.
  • Katz, Charles M., Webb, Vincent J.. Patterns of drug use among DUI arrestees: A research note. Journal of Crime and Justice.19, (2), 215-222.1996.
    • ID: 10.1080/0735648X.1996.9721555 (DOI)
  • Mieczkowski, T., Newel, R., Wraight, B., Coletti, S.. Hair Assays and Urinalysis for Drugs of Abuse Among Juvenile Offenders: A Comparison of Two Cities Based upon the Drug Use Forecasting Program: Final Report. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1996.
  • Mieczkowski, Thomas M.. The prevalence of drug use in the United States. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 1996.
  • Monahan, Genevieve Louise. A Profile of Pregnant Drug-Using Female Arrestees in California: The Relationships Among Sociodemographic Characteristics, Reproduction and Drug Addiction Histories, HIV/STD Risk Behaviors, and Utilization of Prenatal Care Services and Substance.... Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles. 1996.
  • Palacios, Wilson Raul. Explicating the Drug-Crime Relationship. Dissertation, University of Miami. 1996.
  • Rouse, B.A.. Epidemiology of illicit and abused drugs in the general population, emergency department drug-related episodes, and arrestees. Clinical Chemistry.42, (2), 1330-1336.1996.
  • Webb, Vincent J., Delone, Miriam A.. Drug use among a misdemeanant population: Exploration of a legal syllogism of the 'drug war'. Crime, Law and Social Change.24, (3), 241-255.1996.
    • ID: 10.1007/BF01312208 (DOI)
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting 1994: Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees, Research Report. NCJ 157644, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1995.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/duf1994.pdf (URL)
  • Baldwin, Dana M., Brecht, Mary-Lynn, Monahan, Genevieve, Annon, Kiku, et al. Percieved need for treatment among pregnant and nonpregnant woman arrestees. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.27, (4), 389-399.1995.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.1995.10471703 (DOI)
  • Decker, Scott H., Rosenfeld, Richard. 'My wife is married and so is my girlfriend': Adaptation to the threat of AIDS in an arrestee population. Crime and Delinquency.41, (1), 37 -1995.
    • ID: 10.1177/0011128795041001003 (DOI)
  • Hyatt, R.R., Rhodes, W.. The Price and Purity of Cocaine: The Relationship to Emergency Room Visits and Death, and to Drug Use among Arrestees. Statistics in Medicine.14, (5-7), 655-668.1995.
    • ID: 10.1002/sim.4780140522 (DOI)
  • McElrath, Karen, Dunham, Roger, Cromwell, Paul. Validity of self-reported cocaine and opiate use among arrestees in five cities. Journal of Criminal Justice.23, (6), 531-540.1995.
    • ID: 10.1016/0047-2352(95)00044-5 (DOI)
  • Valdez, Avelardo, Kaplan, Charles D., Curtis, R.L., Jr., Yin, Zenong. Illegal drug use, alcohol and aggressive crime among Mexican-American and white male arrestees in San Antonio. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.27, (2), 135-143.1995.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.1995.10471682 (DOI)
  • Baumer, Eric P.. Poverty, crack, and crime: A cross-city analysis. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.31, (3), 311-327.1994.
    • ID: 10.1177/0022427894031003004 (DOI)
  • Falkin, Gregory P., Prendergast, Michael, Anglin, M. Douglas. Drug treatment in the criminal justice system. Federal Probation.58, (3), 31-36.1994.
  • Falkin, Gregory P., Wellisch, Jean, Prendergast, Michael L., et al. Drug Treatment for Women Offenders: A Systems Perspective. New York, NY: National Drug Research Institutes. 1994.
  • Fendrich, Michael, Xu, Yanchun. The validity of drug use reports from juvenile arrestees. International Journal of the Addictions.28, (9), 971-985.1994.
  • Fiorentine, Robert, Anglin, M. Douglas. Perceiving need for drug treatment: A look at eight hypotheses. International Journal of the Addictions.29, (14), 1835-1854.1994.
  • Goldman, James. Prevalence and Trends of Substance Abuse in Harris County, Texas, 1989-1991. Dissertation, University of Texas at Houston. 1994.
  • Golub, Andrew L., Johnson, Bruce D.. A recent decline in cocaine use among youthful arrestees in Manhattan, 1987 through 1993. American Journal of Public Health.84, (8), 1250-1254.1994.
    • ID: 10.2105/AJPH.84.8.1250 (DOI)
  • Graham, Nannette, Wish, Eric D.. Drug use among female arrestees: Onset, patterns, and relationships to prostitution. Journal of Drug Issues.24, (1-2), 315-329.1994.
  • Timrots, Anita, Renshaw III, Benjamin H., Lindgren, Sue A.. Drug and Crime Facts, 1994. NCJ 154043, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1994.
    • ID: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/dcfacts.pdf (URL)
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting 1992 Annual Report: Drugs and Crime in America's Cities. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1993.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting: 1993 Annual Report. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1993.
  • Chaiken, Jan M., Chaiken, Marcia R.. Understanding the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Sample of Adult Arrestees. Lincoln, MA: LINC. 1993.
  • Johnson, Bruce D., Golub, Andrew, Hossain, Mokerrom. Using a Serious Drug Abuser Scale in the Criminal Justice System. Final Report: Expanding Applications of Drug Use Forecasting Data in New York.NCJ 152209, New York, NY: Institute for Special Populations Research. 1993.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/152209NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Mieczkowski, T., Newell, R.. Comparing Hair and Urinalysis for Cocaine and Marijuana. Federal Probation.57, 59-67.1993.
  • Reardon, Judy A.. The Drug Use Forecasting Program: Measuring Drug Use in a 'Hidden' Population. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1993.
  • Rhodes, William, Scheiman, Paul, Carlson, Kenneth. What America's Users Spend on Illegal Drugs, 1988-1991. Washington, DC: United States Office of National Drug Control Policy. 1993.
  • Rosenfeld, Richard, Decker, Scott H.. Discrepant Values, Correlated Measures: Cross-City and Longitudinal Comparisons of Self Reports and Urine Tests of Cocaine Use among Arrestees. Journal of Criminal Justice.21, 223-230.1993.
    • ID: 10.1016/0047-2352(93)90054-Q (DOI)
  • Rosenfeld, Richard, Decker, Scott H., Blattner, J.. The Validity of Self Reported Drug Use: Comparing Time-Bounded and Unbounded Measures for Individuals and Populations. Meetings of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.Kansas City, MO. 1993.
  • Chaiken, Jan M., Chaiken, Marcia R.. Analysis of the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Sample of Adult Arrestees. Draft report.National Institute of Justice. 1992.
  • Decker, S.. Drug Use Forecasting in St. Louis: A Three-Year Report. . 1992.
  • Decker, Scott, Rosenfeld, Richard. Intravenous drug use and the AIDS epidemic: Findings from a 20-city sample of arrestees. Crime and Delinquency.38, (4), 492-509.1992.
    • ID: 10.1177/0011128792038004006 (DOI)
  • Harrell, A., Wirtz, P.W.. Expanding the Applications of DUF Data: Predicting Community Drug Problems with Juvenile Arrestee Urinalysis Results. Meetings of the American Society of Criminology.New Orleans, LA. 1992.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A., Crawford, C.A., Baldau, V.. Lost Opportunity fo Combat AIDS: Drug Abusers in the Criminal Justice System--An Update. Drugs, Crime, and Social Policy: Research, Issues, and Concerns.Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. 1992.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1991.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1991.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Fourth Quarter: 1990. Research in Action.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting Research Update. Research in Action.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • (author unknown). Implications of the Drug Use Forecasting data for TASC Programs: Female Arrestees. Washington, DC: United States Bureau of Justice Assistance. 1991.
  • Herbert, E.E., O'Neil, J.A.. Drug Use Forecasting: An Insight into Arrestee Drug Use. Reports 224.United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • Mieczkowski, T., Barzley, D., Gropper, B., Wish, E.. Concordance of Three Measures of Cocaine Use in an Arrestee Population. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.23, 241-250.1991.
    • ID: 10.1080/02791072.1991.10471585 (DOI)
  • O'Neil, J.A., Baldau, V.. Drug Use Forecasting 1990 Annual Report. NCJ 130063, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • O'Neil, J.A., Wish, E.D., Visher, C.A.. Drug Use Forecasting 1989 Annual Report. NCJ 123941, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • Visher, Christy. Drug Use Forecasting: Drugs and Crime 1990 Annual Report. Research in Action.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
  • Wish, E.D.. U.S. Drug Policy in the 1990s: Insights from New Data from Arrestees. International Journal of the Addictions.25, (3A), 377-409.1991.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A.. Cocaine Use in Arrestees. Addiction and Recovery.11, (3), 13-16.1991.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A.. Cocaine Use in Arrestees Refining Measures of National Trends by Sampling the Criminal Population - The Epidemiology of Cocaine Use and Abuse. Research Monograph 110.DHHS Pub (ADM) 91-17, Washington, DC: National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1991.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A., Crawford, C.A., Baldau, V.. Lost Opportunities to Combat AIDS: Drug Abusers in the Criminal Justice System - An Update. Drugs, Crime and Social Policy. Needham, MA: Allyn and Bacon. 1991.
  • (author unknown). Arrestee Drug Use. Drug Use Forecasting, January to March 1990.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drugs and Crime 1990: Annual Report. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drugs and Crime in America: 1988 Drug Use Forecasting Report. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Leading Drug Indicators, White Paper. Washington, DC: United States Office of National Drug Control Policy. 1990.
  • Harrell, A.. Forecasting Community Drug Problems with Arrestee Urinalysis Results: Preliminary Results. DUF Cluster Conference.Arlington, VA. 1990.
  • Harrell, A.. Validation of the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) System: Preliminary Findings. . 1990.
  • Mieczkowski, T.. The Accuracy of Self Reported Drug Use: An Evaluation and Analysis of New Data. Drugs, Crime and the Criminal Justice System.Cincinnati: Anderson. 1990.
  • O'Neil, J.A., Wish, E.D., Visher, C.A., Crawford, C.A.. Drug Use Forecasting 1988 Annual Report. NCJ 122225, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1990.
  • Swartz, James A.. Cocaine and Opiates: Prevalence Estimates of their Use by Arrestees and a Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of their Relationship to the Commission of Violent Crime. Dissertation, Northwestern University. 1990.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A., Baldau, V.. Lost Opportunities to Combat AIDS: Drug Abusers in the Criminal Justice System AIDS and IV Drug Users. Research Monograph.Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1990.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting Update. Reports.215, National Institute of Justice. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Implications of Drug Use Forecasting Data for TASC Programs, Report I. National Consortium of TASC Programs. 1989.
  • (author unknown). Implications of Drug Use Forecasting Data for TASC Programs, Report II. National Consortium of TASC Programs. 1989.
  • Cook, L.F.. Drug Use Forecasting Project: Interim Statistical Report. . 1989.
  • Harrison, L.. The Validity of Self Reported Drug Use among Arrestees. Meetings of the American Society of Criminology.Reno, NV. 1989.
  • Mieczkowski, T.. The Accuracy of Self-Reported Drug Use: An Evaluation and Analysis of New Data. Cincinnati, OH: Anderson Publishing, Wayne State University. 1989.
  • Mieczkowski, T.. Understanding Life in the Crack Culture: The Investigative Utility of the Drug Use Forecasting System. Report.Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1989.
  • TASC of Phoenix. How Many Juveniles Gamble with Drugs. . 1989.
  • Westland, C.A., Annon, T.K.. A Report on the Drug Use Forecasting Project: Los Angeles, California, July 27, 1989 Results. Los Angeles, CA: University of California. 1989.
  • Wish, E.D., O'Neil, J.A.. Urine Testing for Drug Use Among Males Arrestees--United States 1989. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.38, (45), 780-783.1989.
  • (author unknown). Drug Use Forecasting (DUF). Research in Action.. 1988.
  • (author unknown). Second Quarterly Report: Portland DUF Project. TASC, Inc.. 1988.
  • (author unknown). Third Quarterly Report: Portland DUF Project. TASC, Inc.. 1988.
  • Mieczkowski, T.. The Damage Done: Cocaine Methods in Detroit. International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice.12, 1988.
    • ID: 10.1080/01924036.1988.9688897 (DOI)
  • Stephens, R.C., Feucht, T.E.. A Report on the Drug Use Forecasting Project: Cleveland, Ohio, November 1988 Results. Cleveland, OH: Cleveland State University. 1988.
  • (author unknown). First Quarterly Report: Portland DUF project. TASC, Inc.. 1987.
  • Westland, C.A., Anglin, M.D., Wang, J.. Annual Epidemiological Analysis of Los Angeles County DUF Data. . 1987.
  • Wish, E.D.. Research in Action: Drug Use Forecasting (DUF): New York 1984 to 1986. . 1986.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (1991): Drug Use Forecasting in 24 Cities in the United States, 1987-1997. Version 2. Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) Program/Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) Series. Version: v2. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09477.v2