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Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1982: Three Waves Combined

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : event/transaction data, survey data
Creator
  • Jennings, M. Kent
  • Markus, Gregory B.
  • Niemi, Richard G.
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Collective Title
  • Youth Studies Series
Publication Date
1991-10-23
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Aging
Language
English
Free Keywords
adolescents; family life; family relations; high school students; high schools; life events; parent child relationship; peer groups; personality; political attitudes; political behavior; political change; political participation; political partisanship; political socialization; public policy; social attitudes; social behavior; social protest; social studies; student attitudes; trust in government
Description
  • Abstract

    For this panel survey a national sample of high school seniors and their parents were interviewed in 1965, and again in 1973 and 1982. The survey gauges the impact of life-stage events and historical trends on the behaviors and attitudes of respondents. Each wave has a distinct focus. The 1965 data focus on high school experiences, while the 1973 data deal with the protest era. Data gathered in 1982 emphasize the maturing process and offer information relating to parental issues and family relationships. Other major areas of investigation include political participation, issue positions, group evaluations, civic orientations, personal change over time, stability in attitudes and behaviors over time, and partisanship and electoral behavior.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Standardized missing values..
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Youth Data
    • DS2: Parent Data
    • DS4: SAS Data Definition Statements for Youth Data
    • DS5: SAS Data Definition Statements for Parent Data
Temporal Coverage
  • 1965 / 1982
    Time period: 1965--1982
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
All twelfth-graders in the United States in 1965.
Sampling
The original 1965 youth sample was chosen from a national probability sample of 97 secondary schools (including 11 nonpublic schools) selected with a probability proportionate to their size. Within each school, 15 to 21 randomly designated seniors were interviewed. In 1973, 1,119 of the original 1,669 youths who completed the 1965 interview were reinterviewed, and an additional 229 completed mail-back questionnaires. In 1982, 958 youths were reinterviewed, and 82 completed mail-back questionnaires. The 1965 parents were selected randomly such that for one-third of the students the fathers were interviewed, for another one-third the mothers were interviewed, and for the remaining third both parents were interviewed. In 1973, 1,118 of the original 1,562 parents were reinterviewed, and 62 completed mail-back questionnaires. In 1982, 816 parents were reinterviewed, and 82 completed mail-back questionnaires.
Collection Mode
  • This data collection combines all three waves of this study. The first two waves of this collection are released as YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1973 (ICPSR 7779). The third wave is released as YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1982: WAVE III (ICPSR 9134).

Note
2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 9 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 8 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 7 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 6 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 3 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Aging.
Availability
Download
This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions via web download.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 9553 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Publications
  • Ammann, Sky L.. Creating partisan 'Footprints': The influence of parental religious socialization on party identification. Social Science Quarterly.95, (5), 1360-1380.2014.
    • ID: 10.1111/ssqu.12097 (DOI)
  • Jennings, M. Kent, Stoker, Laura, Bowers, Jake. Politics across generations: Family transmission reexamined. Journal of Politics.71, (3), 782-799.2009.
    • ID: 10.1017/S0022381609090719 (DOI)
  • Luks, Samantha Caroline. Learning Political Cynicism: The Role of Information, Generations, and Events in the Development of Political Trust in the United States. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley. 2000.
  • Zipp, John F., Plutzer, Eric. From Housework to Paid Work: The Implications of Women's Labor Force Participation on Class Identity. Social Science Quarterly.81, (2), 538-554.2000.
  • Sherkat, Darren E., Darnell, Alfred. The effect of parents' fundamentalism on children's educational attainment: Examining differences by gender and children's fundamentalism. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.38, (1), 238-35.1999.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1387581 (URL)
  • Trevor, Margaret C.. Political socialization, party identification, and the gender gap. Public Opinion Quarterly.63, (1), 62-89.1999.
    • ID: 10.1086/297703 (DOI)
  • Curran, Margaret Ann. In Search of a Family Policy: Family Structure, Children's Well-Being and the Effects of Public Policy. Dissertation, Northern Illinois University. 1998.
  • Janoski, Thomas, Musick, March, Wilson, John. Being volunteered? The impact of social participation and pro-social attitudes on volunteering. Sociological Forum.13, (3), 495-519.1998.
    • ID: 10.1023/A:1022131525828 (DOI)
  • Sherkat, Darren E.. Counterculture or Continuity? Competing Influences on Baby Boomers' Religious Orientations and Participation. Social Forces.76, (3), 1087-1114.1998.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3005704 (URL)
  • Cassel, Carol A., Lo, Celia C.. Theories of political literacy. Political Behavior.19, (4), 317-335.1997.
    • ID: 10.1023/A:1024895721905 (DOI)
  • Clydesdale, Timothy T.. Family behaviors among early U.S. baby boomers: Exploring the effects of religion and income change, 1965-1982. Social Forces.76, (2), 605-635.1997.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2580726 (URL)
  • Darnell, Alfred, Sherkat, Darren E.. The impact of Protestant fundamentalism on educational attainment. American Sociological Review.62, (2), 306-315.1997.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2657306 (URL)
  • Rapoport, Ronald B.. Partisanship change in a candidat-centered era. Journal of Politics.59, (1), 185-199.1997.
  • Sherkat, Darren E., Blocker, T. Jean. Explaining the political and personal consequences of protest. Social Forces.75, (3), 1049-1070.1997.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2580530 (URL)
  • Jennings, M. Kent. Political knowledge over time and across generations. Public Opinion Quarterly.60, (2), 228-252.1996.
    • ID: 10.1086/297749 (DOI)
  • Clydesdale, Timothy T.. Money and Faith in America: Exploring the Effects of Religious Restructuring and Income Inequality on Social Attitudes and Family Behavior. Dissertation, Princeton University. 1994.
  • Rice, Tom W.. Partisan Change Among Native White Southerners: 1965-1982. American Politics Quarterly.22, (2), 244-251.1994.
    • ID: 10.1177/1532673X9402200207 (DOI)
  • Wison, John, Sherkat, Darren E.. Returning to the Fold. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.33, (2), 148-161.1994.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1386601 (URL)
  • Beck, Paul Allen, Jennings, M. Kent. Family traditions, political periods, and the development of partisan orientations. Journal of Politics.53, (3), 742-763.1991.
  • Niemi, Richard G., Jennings, M. Kent. Issues and inheritance in the formation of party identification. American Journal of Political Science.35, (4), 970-988.1991.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2111502 (URL)
  • Jennings, M. Kent, Markus, Gregory B.. Political Involvement in the Later Years: A Longitudinal Survey. American Journal of Political Science.32, (2), 302-316.1988.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2111125 (URL)
  • Markus, Gregory B.. Stability and change in political attitudes: Observed, recalled, and 'explained'. Political Behavior.8, (1), 21-44.1986.
    • ID: 10.1007/BF00987591 (DOI)
  • Jennings, M. Kent, Markus, Gregory B.. Partisan orientations over the long haul: Results from the three-wave political socialization panel study. American Political Science Review.78, (4), 1000-1018.1984.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1955804 (URL)
  • Kritzer, Herbert H.. Mothers and fathers, and girls and boys: Socialization in the family revisited. Political Methodology.10, (3), 245-266.1984.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Jennings, M. Kent; Markus, Gregory B.; Niemi, Richard G. (1991): Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1982: Three Waves Combined. Version 1. Youth Studies Series. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09553.v1