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Effects of Cognitive Interviewing, Practice, and Interview Style on Children's Recall Performance in California, 1989-1990

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : clinical data
Creator
  • Geiselman, R. Edward
  • Saywitz, Karen J.
  • Bornstein, Gail K.
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
1992-10-31
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
children; courts; court cases; testimony
Description
  • Abstract

    This data collection, designed to improve the quality of children's testimony in court, evaluates how different types of interview formats affect the completeness and accuracy of children's recall performance. Specifically, the study assesses the impact of a "practice interview" about an event on the completeness and accuracy of later reports about a second, unrelated event. Three interview conditions were employed, and each condition consisted of both a practice interview and a target interview. The three conditions were RS, RC, and CC, where "R" represents a practice session with rapport-building only, "S" represents a target interview that contained all components of the standard interview procedure, and "C" represents either a practice or target interview that contained all components of the cognitive interview procedure. In rapport-building sessions, interviewers talked about school activities, family life, and favorite games with the child. In standard and cognitive interview sessions, the rapport-building sessions were followed by a request from the interviewer for the child to verbalize a narrative account of "what happened" during an event that had been previously staged by the experimenter. This narrative account was then followed by the interviewer's request for additional information about the event. Cognitive interviews also included several additional questions that were hypothesized to improve recall performance. The number of correct items recalled and the number of incorrect items generated were used to compare the performance of children in the three interview conditions.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • 1989 / 1990
    Time period: 1989--1990
  • 1989-01 / 1990-12
    Collection date: 1989-01--1990-12
Geographic Coverage
  • California
  • United States
Sampled Universe
All third- and sixth-graders in California.
Sampling
Convenience sample of 34 third-graders between the ages of 8 and 9 years, and 56 sixth-graders between the ages of 11 and 12.
Collection Mode
  • The codebook is provided as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file.

Note
2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.1999-12-14 SAS and SPSS data definition statements and a PDF version of the codebook have been added to this collection. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (88-IJ-CX-0033).
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 9789 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR09789.v1
Publications
  • Geiselman, R. Edward, Saywitz, Karen J., Bornstein, Gail K.. Effects of cognitive questioning techniques on children's recall performance. Child Victims, Child Witnesses: Understanding and Improving Testimony.New York, NY: The Guildford Press. 1993.
  • Geiselman, R. Edward, Bornstein, Gail. New Approach to Interviewing Children: A Test if Its Effectiveness. National Institute of Justice Research in Brief.NCJ 135011, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. 1992.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/135011NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Saywitz, Karen J., Geiselman, R. Edward, Bornstein, Gail K.. Effects of cognitive interviewing and practice on children's recall performance. Journal of Applied Psychology.77, 744-756.1992.
    • ID: 10.1037/0021-9010.77.5.744 (DOI)
  • Geiselman, R. Edward, Saywitz, Karen J., Bornstein, Gail K.. Effects of Cognitive Interviewing, Practice, and Interview Style on Children's Recall Performance, Final Report. NCJ 130600, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1991.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/130600NCJRS.pdf (URL)

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-15

Geiselman, R. Edward; Saywitz, Karen J.; Bornstein, Gail K. (1992): Effects of Cognitive Interviewing, Practice, and Interview Style on Children's Recall Performance in California, 1989-1990. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09789