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Sociopolitical Determinants of Perceived Risk, 1998

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Slovic, Paul (Decision Research)
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2013-11-06
Funding Reference
  • National Science Foundation
Language
English
Free Keywords
cloning; control; education; environmental attitudes; gender; hazardous waste disposal; minorities; perceptions; risk; risk assessment; trust (psychology)
Description
  • Abstract

    The Sociopolitical Determinants of Perceived Risk project is an extensive national survey designed to assess the influence of sociopolitical constructs on perceived risk. This research project designed an extensive survey instrument to assess the influence of sociopolitical constructs on perceived risk. The survey was administered to 1,204 randomly selected adults by telephone between September, 1997 and February, 1998. Minority groups (African-American, Hispanic-American, and Asian-American persons) were oversampled. This national survey revealed that men rate a wide range of hazards as lower in risk than women and that whites rate risks lower than non-whites. Non-white females often gave the highest risk ratings. The group with the consistently lowest risk perceptions across a range of hazards was white males. A few exceptions were found: compared with white males, Asian males gave lower risk ratings to six items. Compared with the rest of the sample, white males were more sympathetic with hierarchical, individualistic, and anti-egalitarian views, more trusting of technology managers, less trusting of government, and less sensitive to potential stigmatization of communities from hazards. Although the data showed that white males stood apart from others, the data also revealed substantial heterogeneity in risk perceptions among the race and gender groups that comprised the 'other' category. That is, risk perceptions varied considerably across African-Americans, Asian, and Hispanic males and females. The heterogeneity implies that risk perceptions depend importantly on characteristics of the individuals facing the risk. The sociopolitical constructions included power, control influence, alienation, social class, trust and worldviews. Demographic information pertaining to race, gender, age, education and income was also obtained.
  • Abstract

    This study was designed to assess the influence of sociopolitical constructs on perceived risk.
  • Abstract

    The survey was administered to 1,204 randomly selected adults by telephone between September 1997, and February 1998. Minority groups (African-American, Hispanic-American, and Asian-American persons) were oversampled.
  • Methods

    Weighting the ethnic groups back to their respective proportion in the United States population as a whole, results in a weighted sample size of 861. See the Summary of Survey Methodology file in the user guide.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Standardized missing values.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Response rate ranged by day and race/ethnic groups between 32.5 percent and 54.4 percent. See the Summary of Survey Methodology file in user guide.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Public Use Data
    • DS2: Restricted Use Data
Temporal Coverage
  • 1997-09 / 1998-02
    Time period: 1997-09--1998-02
  • 1997-09-27 / 1998-02-04
    Collection date: 1997-09-27--1998-02-04
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
United States households with phones, with oversampling of non-white households. Smallest Geographic Unit: United States (national survey)
Sampling
Random selection of United States households with phones. Please refer to the "Appendix: Summary of Survey Methodology" in the codebook for more information.
Collection Mode
  • telephone interview

    The original identification number was replaced by a sequential record identifier to protect respondent confidentiality.

    The restricted use data contains qualitative data administrated on a split sample basis where respondents only answered one of the following topics: blood transfusion, eating beef, and cloning.

Note
Funding insitution(s): National Science Foundation (9631635).
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 34637 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR34637.v1

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-16

Slovic, Paul (2013): Sociopolitical Determinants of Perceived Risk, 1998. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34637