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A Study of Wife Abuse Among Vietnamese Immigrants to the US, 2000-2001

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Morash, Merry (Michigan State University. School of Criminal Justice)
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2015-02-09
Funding Reference
  • National Science Foundation
Language
English
Free Keywords
Asian Americans; court cases; court system; divorce; domestic assault; domestic responsibilities; domestic violence; immigrants; legal aid; mental health; police community relations; police intervention; spouse abuse; victim rights; victim safety; victim services; violence against women; womens health care; womens rights; womens shelters
Description
  • Abstract

    This study involved a purposive sample of 129 Vietnamese immigrant women to the United States, 57 of whom experienced domestic violence. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected on abuse, efforts to stop the abuse, immigration experiences, current and prior relationship with partners, and many facets of life. One year after the first interview, the women who had experienced abuse were re-interviewed to determine whether their circumstances had changed and why they had or had not changed. For both interviews, data were collected on contacts with the justice system and satisfaction with those contacts. To measure abuse and one-year outcomes, variables included: values/norms promoting husband's domination, conflict over expectations about gender roles and other aspects of family life, immigration (reasons for immigration, sequencing of husband's and wife's move, each person's legal status), and circumstances related to immigration (discrimination, employment and occupational status, proximity of extended family, wife's support network). Qualitative data on the pattern, nature, and context of the abuse was collected to provide description of why the abuse occurred, and to support findings from the quantitative analysis and/or better specify the causative model. Additional variables included wife's perceptions of immigration law and the outcome of criminal justice involvement; wife's perception of the consequences of divorce (financial, legal realities and cultural norms regarding child custody, effect of marital status on woman's social status and quality of life); need for and effects of wife moving from the ethnic community to the mainstream to escape abuse (need of identification with the ethnic group, support network of relatives and friends, social reactions to abuse); wife's economic power (ability to speak English, earn a living); wife's experience in seeking help (knowledge of United States legal system, availability of legal and victim assistance for abused women, experience with the justice system and victim assistance programs). Demographic variables included age, race, citizenship status, religion, education, and number of children.
  • Abstract

    The purpose of the study is to: Provide a detailed understanding of the different patterns of abuse and the factors contributing to wife abuse, so that the problem can be recognized, and effective prevention can be designed.; Document the consequences of abuse to provide evidence of the importance of the problem.; Understand women's decisions to seek and use different types of help so that the availability of assistance can be increased.; Examine the aftermath of abuse, including experience with service providers, and the pathways to positive outcomes for women and their families, so that effective interventions can be designed.;
  • Abstract

    The research involved a purposive sample of 129 Vietnamese immigrant women to the United States, 57 of whom experienced domestic violence. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected on abuse, efforts to stop the abuse, immigration experiences, current and prior relationship with partners, and many facets of life. One year after the first interview, the women who had experienced abuse were re-interviewed to determine whether their circumstances had changed and why they had or had not changed.
  • Abstract

    Variables include demographic (age, race, birthplace, years of education, religion), occupation, children, financial support, types and degrees of physical/mental harm, divorce or separation, whether protection orders were obtained, whether police were involved, whether the legal system was involved, whether other counseling/assistance was involved, why different types of interventions were sought or not, why fighting/violence occurred, and how helpful different interventions were.
  • Methods

    none
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Standardized missing values.; Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Presence of Common Scales: Modified version of the conflict tactics scale. Women's Experience with Battering Scale Depression measured with an adaptation of a scale adapted from the Center of Epidemiological Studies Scale.
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Of the 129 women, 72 reported abuse in the year prior to the initial interview. 57 (79 percent) could be reached for a second interview. None declined, but the remainder could not be located, usually because they had moved from the area.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: First Interview - Public Use Data
    • DS2: Second Interview - Public Use Data
    • DS3: First Interview - Restricted Use Data
    • DS4: Second Interview - Restricted Use Data
Temporal Coverage
  • 1999 / 2002
    Time period: 1999--2002
  • 2000 / 2002
    Collection date: 2000--2002
Geographic Coverage
  • Boston
  • Massachusetts
  • United States
Sampled Universe
In one metropolitan area in northeastern United States, women were recruited from a domestic violence advocacy agency, the health center that serviced the population, a relevant civic association and cultural clubs, and snowball sampling in the community. 129 women were recruited for the first interview. The 57 women who reported abuse were interviewed one year later. Smallest Geographic Unit: part of a metropolitan area
Sampling
Purposive supplemented by snowball. Women recruited from one metropolitan area in northeastern United States, known to be in abusive relationships from involvement in advocacy programs or shelters designed to help abused women.
Collection Mode
  • face-to-face interview

    A one-year follow-up was conducted.

Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 35247 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR35247.v1
Publications
  • Yingling, Julie, Morash, Merry, Song, Juyoung. Outcomes associated with common and immigrant-group specific responses to intimate terrorism. Violence Against Women.21, (2), 206-228.2015.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801214564769 (DOI)
  • Bui, Hoan, Morash, Merry. Immigration, masculinity, and intimate partner violence from the standpoint of domestic violence service providers and Vietnamese-origin women. Feminist Criminology.3, (3), 191-215.2008.
    • ID: 10.1177/1557085108321500 (DOI)
  • Morash, Merry, Bui, Hoan. The connection of U.S. best practices to outcomes for Vietnamese American women abused by intimate partners. International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice.32, (2), 221-241.2008.
    • ID: 10.1080/01924036.2008.9678787 (DOI)
  • Morash, Merry, Bui, Hoan, Stevens, Tia, Zhang, Yan. Getting out of harm's way: One-year outcomes for abused women in a Vietnamese immigrant enclave. Violence Against Women.14, (12), 1413-1429.2008.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801208327020 (DOI)
  • Bui, Hoan N., Morash, Merry. Social capital, human capital, and reaching out for help with domestic violence: A case study of women in a Vietnamese-€American community. Criminal Justice Studies.20, (4), 375-390.2007.
    • ID: 10.1080/14786010701758146 (DOI)
  • Morash, Merry, Bui, Hoan, Yan Zhang, Holtfreter, Kristy. Risk factors for abusive relationships: A study of Vietnamese American immigrant women. Violence Against Women.13, (7), 653-675.2007.
    • ID: 10.1177/1077801207302044 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-16

Morash, Merry (2015): A Study of Wife Abuse Among Vietnamese Immigrants to the US, 2000-2001. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35247