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metadata language: English

Primacy in the Effects of Face Exposure: Perception is Influenced More By Faces That Are Seen First

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : experimental data
Creator
  • Little, Anthony (University of Stirling)
  • Jones, Benedict (University of Glasgow)
  • DeBruine, Lisa (University of Glasgow)
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2014-11-07
Language
English
Free Keywords
adaptation; cognitive processes; perceptions
Description
  • Abstract

    Exposure to faces biases perceptions of subsequently viewed faces. In literature on memory, there are prominent effects of primacy, whereby people remember things better if they are at the beginning of a list. Here we tested for primacy in face exposure by exposing people to faces that had been transformed in opposite directions twice. In one condition, for example, we exposed people to "plus" faces and measured how much they thought "plus" faces appeared normal and then exposed them to "anti" faces and again measured how much they thought "plus" faces appeared normal. A primacy effect would be seen if after the second measurement, judgments of "plus" faces were unchanged from the first measurement whereas a recency effect would be seen if after the second measurement, judgments of "plus" faces were lower than from the first measurement. We found no change in normality judgement between first and second judgments supporting a primacy effect. Our results indicated a primacy effect in adaptation whereby faces seen first affected perception more than faces seen later. This primacy effect could lead to long lasting effects of exposure to faces.
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • 2005-01-10 / 2005-02-11
    Time period: 2005-01-10--2005-02-11
  • 2005-01-10 / 2005-02-11
    Collection date: 2005-01-10--2005-02-11
Geographic Coverage
  • United Kingdom
Sampling
Convenience, volunteers visiting a research website.
Collection Mode
  • web-based survey

    This dataset is associated with an in press publication: Little AC, Jones BC, and DeBruine LM. (In Press). Primacy in the effects of face exposure: perception is influenced more by faces that are seen first. Archives of Scientific Psychology.

Availability
Download
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 35518 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Publications
  • Little, A.C., Jones. B.C., DeBruine, L.M.. Primacy in the effects of face exposure: Perception is influenced more by faces that are seen first. Archives of Scientific Psychology.2014.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 6 | Registration Date: 2015-06-16

Little, Anthony; Jones, Benedict; DeBruine, Lisa (2014): Primacy in the Effects of Face Exposure: Perception is Influenced More By Faces That Are Seen First. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35518.v1