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Disorder and Community Decline in Forty Neighborhoods of the United States, 1977-1983

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : aggregate data
Creator
  • Skogan, Wesley G.
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
1989-01-10
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
crime; drugs; gang violence; neighborhood change; neighborhood conditions; neighborhoods; vandalism
Description
  • Abstract

    This data collection was designed to evaluate the effects of disorderly neighborhood conditions on community decline and residents' reactions toward crime. Data from five previously collected datasets were aggregated and merged to produce this collection: (1) REACTIONS TO CRIME PROJECT, 1977 [CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, SAN FRANCISCO]: SURVEY ON FEAR OF CRIME AND CITIZEN BEHAVIOR (ICPSR 8162), (2) CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH AND LOW CRIME NEIGHBORHOODS IN ATLANTA, 1980 (ICPSR 8951), (3) CRIME FACTORS AND NEIGHBORHOOD DECLINE IN CHICAGO, 1979 (ICPSR 7952), (4) REDUCING FEAR OF CRIME PROGRAM EVALUATION SURVEYS IN NEWARK AND HOUSTON, 1983-1984 (ICPSR 8496), and (5) a survey of citizen participation in crime prevention in six Chicago neighborhoods conducted by Rosenbaum, Lewis, and Grant. Neighborhood-level data cover topics such as disorder, crime, fear, residential satisfaction, and other key factors in community decline. Variables include disorder characteristics such as loitering, drugs, vandalism, noise, and gang activity, demographic characteristics such as race, age, and unemployment rate, and neighborhood crime problems such as burglary, robbery, assault, and rape. Information is also available on crime avoidance behaviors, fear of crime on an aggregated scale, neighborhood satisfaction on an aggregated scale, and cohesion and social interaction.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Standardized missing values..
  • Table of Contents

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • 1977 / 1983
    Time period: 1977--1983
  • Collection date: 1985
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampling
The 40 neighborhoods are a convenience sample based on the availability of surveys with similar variables of interest. Each of the five data collections from which the sample was drawn used different procedures for selecting respondents and different definitions of community. See detailed descriptions in Lewis and Skogan (ICPSR 8162), Greenberg (ICPSR 7951), Taub and Taylor (ICPSR 7952), Pate and Annan (ICPSR 8496), and Skogan's final report to the National Institute of Justice.
Note
1998-04-20 The data have been reformatted to logical record length, and new SPSS data definition statements have been prepared. Also, SAS data definition statements were produced for the collection, and the codebook was converted to a Portable Document Format file. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (85-IJ-CX-0074).
Availability
Delivery
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 8944 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR08944.v2
Publications
  • Skogan, Wesley G.. Concern about crime and confidence in the police: Reassurance or Accountability?. Police Quarterly.12, (3), 301-318.2009.
    • ID: 10.1177/1098611109339893 (DOI)
  • Kurki, Leena. Restorative and community justice in the United States. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2000.
  • Harcourt, Bernard E.. Reflecting on the subject: a critique of the social influence conception of deterrence, the broken windows theory, and order-maintenance policing New York style. Michigan Law Review.97, (2), 291-389.1998.
    • ID: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1290289 (URL)
  • Hope, Tim. Community crime prevention. Building a Safer Society: Strategic Approaches to Crime Prevention. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 1995.
  • Palmiotto, Michael J., Donahue, Michael E.. Evaluating community policing: Problems and prospects. Police Studies.18, (2), 33-53.1995.
  • Skogan, Wesley G.. Disorder and Decline: Crime and the Spiral of Decay in American Neighborhoods. New York: Free Press. 1990.
  • Skogan, Wesley. Disorder and Community Decline, Draft Executive Summary. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1987.
  • Skogan, Wesley. Disorder and Community Decline, Final Report. NCJ 108736, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. 1987.

Update Metadata: 2015-08-05 | Issue Number: 3 | Registration Date: 2015-06-30

Skogan, Wesley G. (1989): Disorder and Community Decline in Forty Neighborhoods of the United States, 1977-1983. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08944.v1