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National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), [United States], 2010-2012

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • NSECE Project Team (National Opinion Research Center)
Other Title
  • NSECE (Alternative Title)
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2014-11-11
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
child care; education; educational needs; educational policy; low income groups; school age children
Description
  • Abstract

    The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) is a set of four integrated, nationally representative surveys conducted in 2012. These were surveys of (1) households with children under 13, (2) home-based providers (3) center-based providers, and (4) the center-based provider workforce. The NSECE documents the nation's current utilization and availability of early care and education (including school-age care), in order to deepen the understanding of the extent to which families' needs and preferences coordinate well with providers' offerings and constraints. The experiences of low-income families are of special interest as they are the focus of a significant component of early care and education/school-age (ECE/SA) public policy. The NSECE calls for nationally-representative samples including interviews in all fifty states and Washington, DC. The study is funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), United States Department of Health and Human Services. The project team is led by NORC at the University of Chicago, in partnership with Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago and Child Trends. Additional information about this study can be found on the NSECE Web site. The Quick Tabulation and Public-Use Files are currently available via this site. Restricted-Use Files are also available at three different access levels; to determine which level of file access will best meet your needs, please see the NSECE Data Files Overview for more information. Restricted-Use Files are available via Research Connections. To obtain the Level 1 files, researchers must agree to the terms and conditions of the Restricted Data Use Agreement and complete an application via ICPSR's online Restricted Data Contracting System. Level 2 and 3 Restricted-Use Files are available via the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). For more information, please see the access instructions for NSECE Levels 2/3 Restricted-Use Data.
  • Abstract

    The primary purpose of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) was to provide a comprehensive snapshot of both the availability and utilization of early care and education in the United States. The main objectives of the study included: Providing the first national portrait of the availability of early care and education for the full spectrum of care providers, including households and providers from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.; Identifying early care and education and school-age care (ECE/SA) needs and preferences among households in the United States with children under age 13 as they pertain to supporting both the employment of parents and the development of children.; Capturing data on all forms of non-parental care for all children in a household.; Providing the perspectives of both families and providers on the services offered in a system where children are often in multiple arrangements and providers receive funding from multiple sources.; Linking the data set collected with policy-relevant data.; Increasing the understanding of the care received by low-income children and how that varies across communities.;
  • Methods

    The NSECE is a coordinated set of four nationally representative surveys pertaining to the supply of and demand for early care and education in the United States, including the individuals working directly with children. There are two primary sources of sample for these four surveys, a household sample and a provider sample. A household sample was constructed using an address-based sample of housing units. In order to draw a nationally representative sample of the supply of early care and education, the project constructed a list of providers from several administrative lists. Using a household screener, eligible households were identified for the household questionnaire and for the home-based provider questionnaire from the household sample. Three different surveys used the provider sample. Center-based providers of early care and education to children not yet in kindergarten were selected through a center-based screener for the center-based provider questionnaire. From the center-based providers who completed a center-based provider interview, respondents were selected for the workforce questionnaire. Also from the administrative lists, home-based providers were selected for the home-based provider survey. Note that the home-based provider survey includes both samples: the household (for unlisted providers) and the administrative lists (for listed providers).
  • Methods

    Household Survey: This survey documents the nation's demand for early care and education services. Key questionnaire topics include details on usage of non-parental care, expenditures on non-parental care, parental search behavior for early care and education, and the balance of parental employment with child care needs and availability. Data from multiple children, details of parental searches for care, and innovative approaches for determining likely participation in government programs (such as CCDF, Head Start, or public pre-K) are all innovations in the household questionnaire instrument.; Home-Based Provider Survey: Key questionnaire topics in the home-based provider questionnaire include enrollment and the characteristics of the children served, rates charged for care, participation in government programs, household composition, qualifications for and attitudes toward early childhood education, use of curricula and activities conducted with children (varied to be appropriate for younger children and school-age children).; Center-Based Provider Survey: Topics covered by this instrument include enrollment and characteristics of children served, staffing, prices charged, schedules of service, participation in government programs, and staff compensation and professional development policies. The questionnaire also includes the selection of a representative classroom about which more detailed staffing, compensation, and curriculum information are collected. Although no observational data are collected on the care provided, the questionnaire includes a variety of measures at both the program and individual staff levels that have been found in the literature to predict observed quality of care.; Workforce Survey: Topics include information about the work setting (activities in the classroom, interactions with parents and other staff, availability of professional development and other supports), roles and responsibilities (lead teacher, teacher, assistant teacher, aide), compensation (wages and benefits), and perceived leadership and morale, as well as personal information about qualifications, attitudes toward ECE, and stress, depression, and demographic information.;
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Created online analysis version with question text.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Household Survey: A total of 65,712 screening interviews were completed, for a weighted screener completion rate of 91.1 percent. From these, 11,629 eligible households completed a Household interview, yielding a weighted interview completion rate of 67.1 percent. The overall weighted response rate is 62.2 percent.; Home-Based Provider Survey: The NSECE data include a combined total of 5,986 for Listed and Unlisted Home-Based provider interviews. For Listed Home-Based providers, eligibility was confirmed for a total of 5,752 home-based providers, for a weighted screener completion rate of 86.51 percent. From these, 3,934 eligible Listed Home-Based providers completed a Home-Based provider interview, yielding a weighted interview completion rate of 93.3 percent. The overall weighted response rate is 80.7 percent. For Unlisted Home-Based providers, a total of 65,712 screening interviews were completed, for a weighted screener completion rate of 91.1 percent. From these, 2,052 eligible Unlisted Home-Based providers completed an Unlisted Home-Based provider interview, yielding a weighted interview completion rate of 66.4 percent. The overall weighted response rate for unlisted providers is 67.5 percent.; Center-Based Provider Survey: A total of 15,805 screening interviews were completed, for a weighted screener completion rate of 94.3 percent. From these, 8,265 eligible Center-Based Providers completed a Center-Based interview, yielding a weighted interview completion rate of 78.2 percent. The overall weighted response rate is 73.7 percent.; Workforce Survey: Altogether, 5,556 interviews were completed with workforce respondents. A total of 7,230 center-based provider questionnaires were completed with adequate data to sample a workforce respondent, for a weighted screener completion rate of 88.1 percent. From these, 5,556 eligible workforce employees completed a Workforce interview, yielding a weighted interview completion rate of 80.7 percent. The overall weighted response rate is 71.2 percent.;
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Workforce Quick Tabulation File
    • DS2: Center-based Provider Quick Tabulation File
    • DS3: Home-based Unlisted Provider Quick Tabulation File
    • DS4: Home-based Listed Provider Quick Tabulation File
    • DS5: Household Child-level Quick Tabulation File
    • DS6: Household Quick Tabulation File
    • DS7: Workforce Public-Use Data File
    • DS8: Center-based Public-Use Data File
    • DS9: Home-based Public-Use Data File
    • DS10: Household Calendar Public-Use Data File
    • DS11: Household Public-Use Data File
    • DS12: Workforce Restricted-Use Data File
    • DS13: Center-based Restricted-Use Data File
    • DS14: Home-based Restricted-Use Data File
    • DS15: Household Restricted-Use Data File
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 2010--2012
  • 2010 / 2012
  • Collection date: 2011-09--2012-06
  • 2011-09 / 2012-06
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Households and early care and education providers in the United States. Smallest Geographic Unit: Country
Sampling
The NSECE sample design is a multistage probability design. In the first stage, 219 primary sampling units (PSUs) were selected across all 50 states and DC. PSUs were allocated to states by size based on the population of children under age 18 within each state. In the second stage, secondary sampling units (SSUs) were selected for the household sample. Because the experiences of low-income families are of special interest in public policy addressing early care and education/school-age (ECE/SA), the NSECE sample design included a low-income oversample. SSUs were selected disproportionately from areas in which at least 40 percent of households had income below 250 percent of federal poverty guidelines. Altogether, 755 SSUs were selected, with 537 SSUs in these lower-income areas and 218 in areas with lower densities of low-income households. OPRE made available to the states the opportunity to supplement their NSECE samples for the purpose of increasing state-specific sample sizes and analytic power. The states of New York and Illinois both exercised this option to supplement. The 219 PSUs and 755 SSUs in the final sample reflect an expansion of the number of PSUs by two and the number of SSUs by 14 relative to what would have been allocated in the absence of supplementation. There are two primary sources of sample for this study. A household sample was constructed as a hybrid between an address-based sample of housing units selected from the Delivery Sequence File (DSF) maintained by the United States Postal Service and a freshly listed sample of housing units in a small number of locations where the DSF lacked adequate coverage to support a high-quality sample. In order to draw a nationally representative sample of the supply of early care and education, the project constructed a sampling frame of "listed" providers from administrative lists. This frame was built through compiling and geo-coding all available state-level and national lists of providers of early care and education collected from various agencies in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. These lists of providers included licensing, regulation, and license-exempt lists, as well as lists of providers in specific programs such as offering Head Start or public pre-kindergarten.
Collection Mode
  • face-to-face interview
  • paper and pencil interview (PAPI)
  • self-enumerated questionnaire
  • telephone interview
  • web-based survey
Note
2019-03-25 Updated Household codebook files were released for datasets 6, 11, and 15 (both public and restricted). Updated Center-based Provider documentation was also released for datasets 8 and 13 (both public and restricted).2019-01-21 Updated Household codebook files were released for datasets 6, 11, and 15 (both public and restricted).2018-10-02 Updated Center-based Public-Use File and Codebook with five new price flag variables (CB_CHRG_FLAG_X).2017-09-27 Updated Household Calendar Public-Use Codebook released.2017-09-01 The household public-use file has been updated to include variables previously made restricted. The variable HH_ECON_INCOME_MONTHLY has been corrected in the Household Quick Tabulation file, as well as the variable HH_G3_INCOME_MONTHLY in the Household Restricted-Use Data file. New user guides were provided for the Household Quick Tabulation File, in addition to public and restricted Home-based and Household files.2017-06-15 Updated codebooks for the Center-based and Workforce Files were released.2016-12-01 Updated codebooks for the Household Calendar Public-Use File and Household Restricted-Use File were released.2016-11-21 The household public-use file has been updated to include variables previously made restricted. A new user guide was also provided.2016-11-01 Updates have been made to the study's documentation for all public-use files.2016-06-15 Adding public-use documentation to Restricted-Use Data parts.2016-06-15 Releasing the Level 1 Restricted-Use Files.2016-01-04 The Center-based Provider Public-Use File was updated to include the classroom weight and missing value labels for CB_F4_STAFFNAME_R_1. The documentation for the file has also been updated to reflect these additions.2015-06-12 Released data files for all five Public-Use Files. Also, updated documentation with additional information for all five Public-Use Files has been released. In addition, a correction was made to the footnote in the documentation for the Center-based Provider Quick Tabulation file and Workforce Quick Tabulation File. An updated data file for the Center-based Provider Quick Tabulation file including previously missing value labels has also been released.2015-04-06 Released documentation for all five Public-Use Files.2015-03-12 Changed year in the study title.2015-03-11 Released the Household Quick Tabulation File and the Household Child-level Quick Tabulation File.2015-02-20 Released the Home-based Unlisted Provider Quick Tabulation File and the Home-based Listed Provider Quick Tabulation File.2014-11-18 Released the Center-based Provider Quick Tabulation File. Funding institution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (HHHSP23320095647WC).
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 35519 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR35519.v2
Publications
  • Hooper, Alison, Hallam, Rena. Identifying profiles of listed home-based child care providers based on their beliefs and self-reported practices. Early Childhood Research Quarterly.47, (2nd Quarter), 194-205.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.11.008 (DOI)
  • NORC. 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education: State Supplement Opportunities. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.Chicago, IL: NORC. 2019.
    • ID: https://www.researchconnections.org/childcare/manage/downloadFile/36603 (URL)
  • Pilarz, Alejandra Ros, Lin, Ying-Chun, Magnuson, Katherine A.. Do parental work hours and nonstandard schedules explain income-based gaps in center-based early care and education participation?. Social Service Review.93, (1), 55-95.2019.
    • ID: 10.1086/702685 (DOI)
  • Zhao, Jianzhi, Lu, Jiahuan. The overpaid and underpaid: A comparison of labor costs in nonprofit and for-profit service organizations. Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences.12, (1), 117-136.2019.
    • ID: 10.1007/s40647-018-0228-9 (DOI)
  • Derrick-Mills, Teresa, Greenberg, Erica, Isaacs, Julia B., Michie, Molly, Stevens, Kathryn. Are Higher Subsidy Payment Rates and Provider-Friendly Payment Policies Associated with Child Care Quality?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 2018.
    • ID: https://​www.​urban.​org/​sites/​default/​files/​publication/​96681/​are_​higher_​subsidy_​payment_​rates_​and_​provider-friendly_​payment_​policies_​associated_​with_​child_​care_​quality_​1.​pdf (URL)
  • Ferguson, Daniel. National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) Bibliography, 2nd ed.. Child Care & Early Education Research Connections, Bibliography. 2018.
  • Ferreira van Leer, Kevin. Early Childhood Education Decision-making Among Latino Foreign-born Parents in the United States: A Mixed Methods Study. dissertation, Boston College. 2018.
  • Greenberg, Erica, Derrick-Mills, Teresa, Healy, Olivia. Assessing Quality Across the Center-Based Early Care and Education Workforce: Evidence from the National Survey of Early Care and Education. Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population.Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 2018.
  • Greenburg, Erica, Healy, Olivia, Derrick-Mills, Teresa. Assessing Quality across the Center-based Early Care and Education Workforce. Evidence from the National Survey of Early Care and Education.Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/publication/96366/assessing_quality_across_the_center-based_early_care_and_education_workforce.pdf (URL)
  • Guzman, Lina, Gennetian, Lisa A., Hickman, Shelby, Turner, Kimberly. Who Is Caring for Latino Children? The Characteristics of Early Care and Education Teachers and Caregivers Serving a High Proportion of Hispanic Children. Publication No. 2018-24.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2018.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Hispanics-Center-ECE-Workforce-Brief-7.31.pdf (URL)
  • Hepburn, Peter. Parental work schedules and child-care arrangements in low-income families. Journal of Marriage and Family.80, (5), 1187-1209.2018.
    • ID: 10.1111/jomf.12505 (DOI)
  • Hooper, Alison. Predictors of instructional practices among a nationally representative sample of home-based child care providers. Child and Youth Care Forum.47, (5), 747-768.2018.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10566-018-9456-z (DOI)
  • Isaacs, Julia B., Derrick-Mills, Teresa, Greenberg, Erica. Subsidy Policies and the Quality of Child Care Centers Serving Subsidized Children. Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population.Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/publication/96361/subsidy_policies_and_the_quality_of_child_care_centers_serving_subsidized_children_2.pdf (URL)
  • Jones, Jasmine. Determinants of Motivation Among Home-based Providers Serving 3-5 Year Olds. Thesis, Georgetown University. 2018.
  • Madill, Rebecca, Friese, Sarah, Lin, Van-Kim Bui, Paschall, Katherine W.. Access to Early Care and Education for Disadvantaged Families: Do Levels of Access Reflect States' Child Care Subsidy Policies?. Child Trends Report No. 2018-07.Bethesda, MD: Child Trends. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OPREResultsBriefAccessDisadvantaged-FamiliesUpdate_ChildTrends_March1.pdf (URL)
  • Madill, Rebecca, Gebhart, Tracy, Halle, Tamara, Shuey, Elizabeth. Supporting the psychological well-being of the early care and education workforce: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education. OPRE Report No. 2018-49.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/nsece_psychological_wellbeing_612018_to_opre_508_2.pdf (URL)
  • Mendez, Julia L., Crosby, Danielle A.. Why and How Do Low-income Hispanic Families Search for Early Care and Education (ECE)?. Publication No. 2018-15.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2018.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Hispanics-Center-parental-search-brief-5.16-V2.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. Constructing Center-Based Cluster-Level Metrics to Use in Household Level Analysis: A Tutorial for NSECE Data. 10. Research & Evaluation Methods > 10.2. Research Methods > 10.2.3. Data Analysis & Interpretation. 2018.
  • Phillips, Deborah A., Anderson, Sara, Datta, A.R., Kisker, Ellen E.. The changing landscape of publicly-funded center-based child care: 1990 and 2012. Children and Youth Services Review.91, 94-104.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.05.029 (DOI)
  • Sandstrom, Heather, Gelatt, Julia. How Parental Preferences and Subsidy Receipt Shape Immigrant Families' Child Care Choices. Urban Institute.Washington, DC: Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/publication/94551/how-parental-preferences-and-subsidy-receipt-shape-immigrant-families-child-care-choices_1.pdf (URL)
  • Crosby, Danielle A., Mendez, Julia L.. How Common Are Nonstandard Work Schedules Among LowIncome Hispanic Parents of Young Children?. Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2017.
    • ID: http://​www.​hispanicresearchcenter.​org/​wp-content/​uploads/​2017/​11/​Hispanics-Center-parental-work-hours-Brief-11.​1.​pdf (URL)
  • Datta, A. Rupa. NSECE Webinar: Defining Type of Care in the NSECE. Webinar, Chicago, IL: NORC. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDpU0dnICIg (URL)
  • Datta, A. Rupa, Milesi, Carolina. NSECE Webinar: Schedules of Work and Child Care in the NSECE. Webinar, Chicago, IL: NORC. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OssWdrrUJ0&feature=youtu.be (URL)
  • Guzman, Lina, Gennetian, Lisa A., Hickman, Shelby, Turner, Kimberly. How Well Are Early Care and Education Providers Who Serve Hispanic Children Doing on Access and Availability?. Publication No. 2017-49.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2017.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Hispanic-Center-Providers-Brief-FINAL.pdf (URL)
  • Hooper, Alison. Identifying and exploring profiles of home-based child care providers based on their beliefs and practices. Dissertation, University of Delaware. 2017.
  • Mendez, Julia L., Crosby, Danielle A., Guzman, Lina, Lopez, Michael. Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children Compare Favorably to Other Centers on Key Predictors of Quality. Publication No. 2017-24.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2017.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Predictors-of-Quality.pdf (URL)
  • National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. Designing Family-Friendly Consumer Education on Child Care. Health Resources and Services Administration.Fairfax, VA: National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. 2017.
    • ID: https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/public/designing_family_friendly_consumer_education_on_child_care.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. Parent Work Schedules in Households with Young Children. OPRE Report No. 2017-48.U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/parent_work_schedules_in_households_with_young_children_toopre_083117.pdf (URL)
  • Sandstrom, Heather, Gelatt, Julia. Child Care Choices of Low-Income, Immigrant Families with Young Children: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education. Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population.Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/publication/94546/child-care-choices-of-low-income-immigrant-families-with-young-children.pdf (URL)
  • Tonyan, Holli A., Paulsell, D., Shivers, Eva Marie. Understanding and incorporating home-based child care into early education and development systems. Early Education and Development.28, (6), 633-639.2017.
    • ID: 10.1080/10409289.2017.1324243 (DOI)
  • Trivedi, Pamala, Burgess, Kimberly, Chadwick, Laura. Factors associated with reduced expulsion in center-based early learning settings: Preliminary findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). Office of Human Services Policy.Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2017.
    • ID: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/255476/NSECEexpulsionanalysis.pdf (URL)
  • Watts, Kathryn S.. Families With Low Incomes and the Search for Child Care: An Exploration of Factors Influencing Search Actions and Choices. Dissertation, University of Maryland. 2017.
  • Ackerman, Debra J.. Using State Early Care and Education Workforce Registry Data to Inform Training-Related Questions: Issues to Consider. ETS Research Report No. RR-16-31.Princeton, NJ: Policy Information Center. 2016.
    • ID: 10.1002/ets2.12117 (DOI)
  • Crosby, Danielle A., Guzman, Lina, Lopez, Michael, Mendez, Julia L.. Hispanic Children’s Participation in Early Care and Education: Type of Care by Household Nativity Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Child Age. No. 2016-59.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2016.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016-59HispECEType.pdf (URL)
  • Crosby, Danielle A., Mendez, Julia L.. Hispanic Children’s Participation in Early Care and Education: Amount and Timing of Hours by Household Nativity Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Child Age. No. 2016-58.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2016.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016-58HispECEHoursAmtTiming1.pdf (URL)
  • Crosby, Danielle, Mendez, Julia, Guzman, Lina, Lopez, Michael. Hispanic Children's Participation in Early Care and Education: Type of Care by Household Nativity Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Child Age. Publication No. 2016-59.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families. 2016.
    • ID: https://childtrends-ciw49tixgw5lbab.stackpathdns.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016-59HispECEType-1.pdf (URL)
  • Guzman, Lina, Gennetian, Lisa A., Hickman, Shelby, Turner, Kimberly. Hispanic Children's Participation in Early Care and Education: Parents' Perceptions of Care Arrangements, and Relatives' Availability to Provide Care. Publication No. 2016-60.Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. 2016.
    • ID: http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016-60HispECEParentPerceptions.pdf (URL)
  • Hepburn, Peter, Gennetian, Lisa A., Smith, Sandra. Limited Resources, Little Time: Work, Family, and Childcare Challenges for Low-Income Families. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley. 2016.
  • Kashen, Julie, Potter, Halley, Stettner, Andrew. Quality Jobs, Quality Child Care: The Case for a Well-Paid, Diverse Early Education Workforce. Century Foundation.New York, NY: Century Foundation. 2016.
    • ID: https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/production.tcf.org/app/uploads/2016/06/14145046/quality-jobs-quality-child-care.pdf (URL)
  • Madill, Rebecca, Blasberg, Amy, Epstein, Dale J., Halle, Tamara, Zaslow, Martha. Describing the Preparation and Ongoing Professional Development of the Infant/ Toddler Workforce: An Analysis of the National Survey for Early Care and Education Data. OPRE Report No. 2016-16.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/cceepra_secondary_analysis_508final_b508.pdf (URL)
  • NORC. PSU and Cluster Weights User Guide. User guide. 2016.
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. Characteristics of Center-based Early Care and Education Programs: Initial Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education. OPRE Report #2016-13.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/characteristics_of_home_based_early_care_and_education_toopre_032416.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. Characteristics of Home-based Early Care and Education Providers: Initial Findings From the National Survey of Early Care and Education. OPRE Report # 2016-13.Chicago, IL: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/characteristics_of_home_based_early_care_and_education_toopre_032416.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. Early Care and Education Usage and Households’ Out-of-Pocket Costs: Tabulations from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). OPRE Report No. 2016-09.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/nsece_usage_and_cost_tabulations_toopre_04302018_508.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team. How Far are Early Care and Education Arrangements from Children’s Homes?. OPRE Report No. 2016-10.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/distance_to_ece_factsheet_111716_b508.pdf (URL)
  • National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team, Brandon, Richard N., Datta, A.R., Gennetian, Lisa A., Goerge, Robert, Guzman, Lina, Milesi, Carolina, Witte, Ann D., Zanoni, Wladimir, Zaslow, Martha. Examining Child Care Subsidy Receipt: An Analysis of Matched NSECE and Illinois Administrative Data. OPRE Report #2016-12.Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. 2016.
    • ID: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/exploratory_analysis_of_matched_il_data_030316_toopre_508compliant.pdf (URL)
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Update Metadata: 2019-09-04 | Issue Number: 28 | Registration Date: 2015-07-01

NSECE Project Team (National Opinion Research Center) (2014): National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), [United States], 2010-2012. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35519.v1