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Firearm Injury Surveillance Study, 1993-2012

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : administrative records data
Creator
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Collective Title
  • National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) Series
Publication Date
2015-10-07
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
accidents; firearms; handguns; medical care; nonfatal injuries; product safety; public health; public safety
Description
  • Abstract

    These data were collected using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), the primary data system of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). CPSC began operating NEISS in 1972 to monitor product-related injuries treated in United States hospital emergency departments (EDs). In June 1992, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, established an interagency agreement with CPSC to begin collecting data on nonfatal firearm-related injuries in order to monitor the incidents and the characteristics of persons with nonfatal firearm-related injuries treated in United States hospital EDs over time. This dataset represents all nonfatal firearm-related injuries (i.e., injuries associated with powder-charged guns) and all nonfatal BB and pellet gun-related injuries reported through NEISS from 1993 through 2012. The cases consist of initial ED visits for treatment of the injuries. Cases were reported even if the patients subsequently died. Secondary visits and transfers from other hospitals were excluded. Information is available on injury diagnosis, firearm type, use of drugs or alcohol, criminal incident, and locale of the incident. Demographic information includes age, sex, and race of the injured person.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS1: Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 1993--2012
  • 1993 / 2012
  • Collection date: 1993--2012
  • 1993 / 2012
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
United States hospitals providing emergency services.
Sampling
The sample design of NEISS is a stratified, probability sample of all United States hospitals that had at least six beds and provided 24-hour emergency services. There were four hospital-sized strata (defined as very large, large, medium, and small, based on the number of annual ED visits) and one children's hospital stratum. From 1993 through 1996, there were 91 NEISS hospital EDs in the sample. In 1997, the sampling frame was updated so that in 1997 through 1999 the sample included 101 NEISS hospital EDs. In 2000-2001, one NEISS hospital dropped out of the system, so there were 100 NEISS hospital EDs in the sample. In 2002, another hospital dropped out of the system, so there were 99 NEISS hospital EDs in the sampling frame. In 1997, CPSC collected firearm-related cases using the "old" and "new" NEISS hospital samples for a nine-month period. This dataset includes data from the "new" sample. The overlapping "old" sample is not included. Comparisons of weighted estimates based on the "old" and "new" samples indicated a difference of about 1 percent in the overall national estimate using these samples. The characteristics of firearm-related cases from these two overlapping samples were also very similar.
Collection Mode
  • computer-assisted self interview (CASI)
  • self-enumerated questionnaire
Note
2018-11-29 Case counts have been corrected in the documentation.2015-10-08 A minor change is made to the codebook. Funding institution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.
Availability
Download
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (help@icpsr.umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 36290 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR36290.v1
Publications
  • Griffin, Russell, Richardson, Joseph B., Kerby, Jeffrey D., McGwin, Gerald. A decompositional analysis of firearm-related mortality in the United States, 2001-2012. Preventive Medicine.106, 194-199.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.031 (DOI)
  • Sharkey, Patrick. The long reach of violence: A broader perspective on data, theory, and evidence on the prevalence and consequences of exposure to violence. Annual Review of Criminology.1, 85-102.2018.
    • ID: 10.1146/annurev-criminol-032317-092316 (DOI)
  • Cook, Philip J., Rivera-Aguirre, Ariadne E., Cerd√°, Magdalena, Wintemute, Garen. Constant lethality of gunshot injuries from firearm assault: United States, 2003-2012. American Journal of Public Health.107, (8), 1324-1328.2017.
    • ID: 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303837 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2018-11-29 | Issue Number: 3 | Registration Date: 2015-10-07

United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (2015): Firearm Injury Surveillance Study, 1993-2012. Archival Version. National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) Series. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36290