My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study [United States] Public-Use Files

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Tobacco Products
Other Title
  • PATH Study (PUF) (Alternative Title)
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Collective Title
  • Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Series
Publication Date
2016-08-01
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Tobacco Products
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
adults; advertising; alcohol; bidis; chewing tobacco; cigarettes; cigarillos; cigars; dissolvable tobacco; e-cigarettes; electronic nicotine devices; ENDS; filtered cigars; health warnings; hookah; kreteks; marijuana; marketing; mental health; nicotine addiction; nicotine dependence; parents; physical health; pipe tobacco; second-hand smoke; sexual preference; smokeless tobacco; smoking cessation; snus pouches; social media; substance abuse; tobacco products; tobacco use; youths
Description
  • Abstract

    The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study began originally surveying 45,971 adult and youth respondents. The PATH Study was launched in 2011 to inform Food and Drug Administration's regulatory activities under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (TCA). The PATH Study is a collaboration between the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Center for Tobacco Products (CTP), Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The study sampled over 150,000 mailing addresses across the United States to create a national sample of tobacco users and non-users. These 45,971 individuals constitute the first (baseline) wave of data collected by this longitudinal cohort study. Respondents are asked to complete an interview at each follow-up wave. Youth who turn 18 by the current wave of data collection are considered "aged-up adults" and are invited to complete the Adult Interview. Additionally, 7,207 "shadow youth" (youth ages 9 to 11 sampled at Wave 1) are considered "aged-up youth" upon turning 12 years old when they are asked to join the study after parental consent. Please refer to the Public-Use Files User Guide that provides further details about these children designated as "shadow youth". At each subsequent wave of data collection, the parents of sampled youth are invited to complete a short Parent Interview about his or her child(ren).Dataset 0001 (DS0001) contains the data from the Master Linkage file. This file contains 14 variables and 67,276 cases. The file provides a master list of every person's unique identification number and what type of respondent they were for each wave. Dataset 1001 (DS1001) contains the data from the Wave 1 Adult Questionnaire. This data file contains 1,732 variables and 32,320 cases. Each of the cases represents a single, completed interview. Dataset 1002 (DS1002) contains the data from the Youth (and Parent) Questionnaire. This file contains 1,228 variables and 13,651 cases.Dataset 2001 (DS2001) contains the data from the Wave 2 Adult Questionnaire. This data file contains 2,197 variables and 28,362 cases. Of these cases, 26,447 also completed a Wave 1 Adult Questionnaire. The other 1,915 cases are "aged-up adults" having previously completed a Wave 1 Youth Questionnaire. Dataset 2002 (DS2002) contains the data from the Wave 2 Youth (and Parent) Questionnaire. This data file contains 1,389 variables and 12,172 cases. Of these cases, 10,081 also completed a Wave 1 Youth Questionnaire. The other 2,091 cases are "aged-up youth" having previously been sampled as "shadow youth." Dataset 3001 (DS3001) contains the data from the Wave 3 Adult Questionnaire. This data file contains 2,139 variables and 28,148 cases. Of these cases, 26,241 are continuing adults having completed a prior Adult Questionnaire. The other 1,907 cases are "aged-up adults" having previously completed a Youth Questionnaire. Dataset 3002 (DS3002) contains the data from the Wave 3 Youth (and Parent) Questionnaire. This data file contains 1,309 variables and 11,814 cases. Of these cases, 9,769 are continuing youth having completed a prior Youth Interview. The other 2,045 cases are "aged-up youth" having previously been sampled as "shadow youth." Datasets (DS3101, DS3102, DS3201, and DS3202) are data files comprising the weight variables for Wave 3. The weight variables for Wave 1 and Wave 2 are included in the main data files. However, in Wave 3, the weight variables have been separated into individual data files for Adult and Youth Questionnaires. The "all-waves" weight files contain weights for those respondents who have completed an interview during all three waves of data collection. The "single-wave" weight files contain weights for all respondents in Wave 3 regardless of whether they completed an interview during Wave 2. Dataset 4001 contains the data from the Wave 4 Adult Questionnaire. This data file contains 2,182 variables and 33,822 cases. Of these cases, 25,857 are continuing adults having completed a prior Adult questionnaire, 1,900 are "aged-up adults" having previously completed a Youth questionnaire, and 6,065 are "replenishment sample adults" (also known as "new cohort adults" in the annotated instrument). Dataset 4002 contains the data from the Wave 4 Youth (and Parent) Questionnaire. This data file contains 1,389 variables and 14,798 cases. Of these cases, 9,365 are continuing youth having completed a prior Youth interview, 1,694 cases are "aged-up youth" having previously been sampled as "shadow youth," and 3,739 are "replenishment sample youth" (also known as "new cohort youth" in the annotated instrument). Datasets 4111, 4211, 4321, 4112, 4212, and 4322 (DS4111, DS4211, DS4321, DS4112, DS4212, and DS4322) are data files comprising the weight variables for Wave 4. In Wave 4, the weight variables have been separated into individual data files corresponding to the Wave 1 and Wave 4 Cohorts and different weight types. The "all-waves" weight files contain weights for those Wave 1 Cohort respondents who completed an interview for all waves in which they were old enough or verified their information for waves in which they were not old enough to be interviewed. The "single-wave" weight files contain weights for Wave 1 Cohort respondents at Wave 4 who completed an interview at Wave 1, regardless of their participation in previous waves. The "cross-sectional" weight files contain weights for all respondents in the Wave 4 Cohort. Each case in an Adult data file represents a single, completed interview. Each case in a Youth data file represents one youth and his or her parent's responses about that youth. Parents who provided permission for their child to participate in a Youth Interview were asked to complete a brief interview about their child. In both waves of data collection, less than 0.5 percent of the parents did not complete an interview. Most questions are asked about the child. In Wave 1, about 88 percent of the "parent" respondents were the biological mother or father. When multiple youth from the same household were selected to be in the study, the parent(s) completed separate interviews about each youth. If one parent completed two or more interviews, that parent only answered questions about himself/herself once. Those questions were then skipped in the subsequent interview(s) for the other child(ren) and the responses duplicated in that child(ren)'s data file(s).
  • Abstract

    The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study is a longitudinal cohort study on tobacco use behavior, attitudes and beliefs, and tobacco-related health outcomes among approximately 46,000 adults and youth in the United States. The study's primary objectives are to: Objective 1: Identify and explain between-person differences and within-person changes in tobacco-use patterns, including the rate and length of use by specific product type and brand, product/brand switching over time, uptake of new products, and dual- and poly-use of tobacco products (i.e., use of multiple products within the same time period and switching between multiple products).; Objective 2: Identify between-person differences and within-person changes in risk perceptions regarding harmful and potentially harmful constituents, new and emerging tobacco products, filters and other design features of tobacco products, packaging, and labeling; and identify other factors that may affect use, such as social influences and individual preferences.; Objective 3: Characterize the natural history of tobacco dependence, cessation, and relapse, including readiness and self-efficacy to quit, motivations for quitting, the number and length of quit attempts, and the length of abstinence related to various tobacco products.; Objective 4: Update the comprehensive baseline and subsequent waves of data on tobacco-use behaviors and related health conditions, including markers of exposure and tobacco-related disease processes identified from the collection and analysis of biospecimens, to assess between-person differences and within-person changes over time in health conditions potentially related to tobacco use, particularly with use of new and different tobacco products, including modified-risk tobacco products.; Objective 5: Assess associations between TCA-specific actions and tobacco-product use, risk perceptions and attitudes, use patterns, cessation outcomes, and tobacco-related intermediate endpoints (e.g., biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers related to disease). Analyses will attempt to account for other potential factors, such as demographics, local tobacco-control policies, and social, familial, and economic factors, that may influence the observed patterns.; Objective 6: Assess between-person differences and within-person changes over time in attitudes, behaviors, exposure to tobacco products, and related biomarkers among and within population sub-groups identified by such characteristics as race-ethnicity, gender, and/or age, or by risk factors, such as pregnancy or co-occurring substance use or mental health disorders.; Objective 7: To the extent to which sample sizes are sufficient, assess and compare samples of former and never users of tobacco products for between-person differences and within-person changes in relapse and uptake, risk perceptions, and indicators of tobacco exposure and disease processes.; Objective 8: Use data from the PATH Study's baseline and follow-up waves on tobacco-use behaviors, attitudes, and related health conditions, including potential markers of exposure and related disease processes identified from the analysis of biospecimens, to screen and subsample respondents for participation in formative and/or nested studies conducted during and after the PATH Study's waves of data and biospecimen collection.;
  • Methods

    At Wave 1, The study sampled over 150,000 mailing addresses which, using a four-staged stratified sampling design, yielded a sample of 45,971 respondents (32,320 adults / 13,651 youth) who completed a Wave 1 interview. Tobacco users and non-users who were at least 9 years old living in a civilian, non-institutionalized setting were considered for participation during Wave 1. Youth who turn 18 by the next wave of data collection are considered "aged-up adults" and are invited to complete the Adult Interview. Additionally, 7,207 "shadow youth" (youth ages 9 to 11 sampled at Wave 1) are considered "aged-up youth" upon turning 12 years old when they are asked to join the study. At Wave 4, the Wave 1 Cohort was replenished with a probability sample of 14,098 adults, youth, and shadow youth ages 10 to 11 selected from the civilian, noninstitutionalized population at the time of Wave 4. This sample was recruited from close to 174,000 mailing addresses not selected for Wave 1, in the same sampled PSUs and segments using similar within-household sampling procedures. To meet the needs for the Wave 4 Cohort shadow sample, a randomly selected subset of the sampled addresses (115,500 or close to two-thirds of the addresses) were screened solely to identify shadow youth ages 10 to 11. The remaining addresses (close to 58,500) were screened for adults, youth, and shadow youth ages 10 to 11. These are referred to as the "SO" (shadow youth only) and "AYS" (adults, youth, and shadow youth) replenishment samples, respectively. This "replenishment sample" was combined for estimation and analysis purposes with Wave 4 adult and youth respondents from the Wave 1 Cohort who were in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population at the time of Wave 4. This combined set of Wave 4 participants, 52,731 participants in total, forms the Wave 4 Cohort. The Adult files contain a single record for every adult participant. The Youth/Parent files contain a single record of every youth who participated in a given wave. Parents who provided permission for their child to complete a Youth Interview were asked to complete a brief Parent Interview that contained questions about parental supervision, school performance, and tobacco use by youth. The Parent Interview is primarily an interview about the child(ren), not the parent. In all four waves, almost all youth had a parent or guardian complete the Parent Interview (over 99.5 percent). When multiple youth from the same household were selected to be in the study, the parent(s) completed separate interviews about each youth. If one parent completed multiple interviews, then questions asked about him or her were only asked once and skipped in the other interview(s). The parent's responses were then duplicated for the other child or children. A $2 incentive was mailed to all addresses sampled at Wave 1 and Wave 4 prior to screening. For all four waves, adult respondents were paid $35 for their participation. Youth were paid $25 to complete the Youth Interview, and their parents were given $10 for each Parent Interview.
  • Methods

    In all four waves, adults and youth were asked about the following types of tobacco products: Cigarettes; E-cigarettes/Electronic nicotine products; Cigars (traditional, cigarillos, filtered); Pipe tobacco; Hookah; Smokeless tobacco (snus pouches and other forms of smokeless tobacco); Dissolvable tobacco; Bidis and kreteks (youth only); Although each section of tobacco products has some unique questions the majority of the questions, fit into one of the following categories: Ever use; Recency of use; Frequency of use; Amount of use; Brands used; Purchase details; Use of flavored products; Harm and addictiveness; Reasons for use; Additional topics, in at least one wave, include: Poly use; Nicotine dependence; Packaging and health warnings; Risk and harm perceptions; Secondhand smoke exposure; Marketing and advertising; Media use; Demographics; Health; Psychosocial and mental health; Substance use; Cessation; Peer and family influences; Most questions asked in the questionnaires are categorical. Other questions ask, for example, the age at which something occurred or the person's body measurements. Responses to these questions are numerical.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: The response rates for the PATH Study are shown below. The Wave 1 interview rates are conditional on completion of the Wave 1 screener. The response rates for Waves 2, 3 and 4 are conditional on Wave 1 participation. Household screener: 54.0 percent (weighted); Wave 1 Adult Interview: 74.0 percent (weighted); Wave 1 Youth Interview: 78.4 percent (weighted); Wave 2 Adult Interview: 83.2 percent (weighted); Wave 2 Youth Interview: 87.3 percent (weighted); Wave 3 Adult Interview: 78.4 percent (weighted); Wave 3 Youth Interview: 83.3 percent (weighted); Wave 4 Adult Interview: 73.5 percent (weighted) ; Wave 4 Youth Interview: 79.5 percent (weighted) ; The response rates for the adults and youth in the Wave 4 replenishment sample are shown below. The Wave 4 interview rates for the adults and youth in this sample are conditional on completion of the Wave 4 screener. Wave 4 Household screener (for households in which youth and adults were recruited): 52.8 (weighted) ; Wave 4 Adult Interview: 68.0 percent (weighted); Wave 4 Youth Interview: 70.6 percent (weighted); Please consult the Public-Use Files User Guide for further information regarding the response rates of data collection.
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Master Linkage File
    • DS1001: Wave 1: Adult Questionnaire Data with Weights
    • DS1002: Wave 1: Youth / Parent Questionnaire Data with Weights
    • DS2001: Wave 2: Adult Questionnaire Data with Weights
    • DS2002: Wave 2: Youth / Parent Questionnaire Data with Weights
    • DS3001: Wave 3: Adult Questionnaire Data
    • DS3002: Wave 3: Youth / Parent Questionnaire Data
    • DS3101: Wave 3: Adult - All-Waves Weights
    • DS3102: Wave 3: Adult - Single-Wave Weights
    • DS3201: Wave 3: Youth / Parent - All-Waves Weights
    • DS3202: Wave 3: Youth / Parent - Single-Wave Weights
    • DS4001: Wave 4: Adult Questionnaire Data
    • DS4002: Wave 4: Youth / Parent Questionnaire Data
    • DS4101: Wave 4: Adult - Wave 1 Cohort All-Waves Weights
    • DS4102: Wave 4: Adult - Wave 1 Cohort Single-Wave Weights
    • DS4103: Wave 4: Adult - Wave 4 Cohort Cross-Sectional Weights
    • DS4201: Wave 4: Youth / Parent - Wave 1 Cohort All-Waves Weights
    • DS4202: Wave 4: Youth / Parent - Wave 1 Cohort Single-Wave Weights
    • DS4203: Wave 4: Youth / Parent - Wave 4 Cohort Cross-Sectional Weights
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 2013--2014
  • 2013 / 2014
  • Time period: 2014--2015
  • 2014 / 2015
  • Time period: 2015--2016
  • 2015 / 2016
  • Time period: 2016--2018
  • 2016 / 2018
  • Collection date: 2013-09--2014-12
  • 2013-09 / 2014-12
  • Collection date: 2014-10--2015-10
  • 2014-10 / 2015-10
  • Collection date: 2015-10--2016-10
  • 2015-10 / 2016-10
  • Collection date: 2016-12--2018-01
  • 2016-12 / 2018-01
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Users and non-users of tobacco products in the civilian, non-institutionalized household population of the United States aged 9 and older at the time of Wave 1. Smallest Geographic Unit: Census Region
Sampling
A four-stage stratified area probability sample design was used in the PATH Study, with a two-phase design for sampling adults at the final stage. At the first stage, a stratified sample of geographical primary sampling units (PSUs) was selected, in which a PSU is a county or group of counties. For the second stage, within each selected PSU, smaller geographical segments were formed and then a sample of these segments was drawn. At the third stage, the sampling frame consisted of the residential addresses located in these segments. The fourth stage selected adults and youth from the sampled households identified at these addresses, with varying sampling rates for adults by age, race, and tobacco use status. Adults were sampled in two phases - Phase 1 sampling used information provided in the household screener and Phase 2 sampling used information provided by the adult in the Phase 2 screener at the beginning of the Adult instrument. Please consult the Public-Use Files User Guide for additional details about the sampling.
Collection Mode
  • audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI)
  • computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI)
Note
2019-11-21 Wave 3 Adult codebook was updated to correct spelling error in question text.2019-11-11 Wave 4 Adult and Youth data files and corresponding documentation were added to the collection. Wave 3 Youth data file updated to correct extraneous characters in variable labels. Adult and Youth Data files across Waves 1-3 were updated to improve the clarity and consistency of variable labels, as well as to reflect the withdrawn participants (indicated by Special Missing -97777). Wave 1 and Wave 2 Adult data files were updated to include 11 Lifetime Threshold of Use Derived Variables. Wave 1 Youth data files were updated to include 1 Lifetime Threshold of Use Derived Variable. Wave 3 Youth data files were updated to include 8 Lifetime Threshold of Use Derived variables. Appendices in the Wave 1 and Wave 2 Adult and Youth codebooks were updated. 2018-09-28 Wave 3 Adult and Youth data files and corresponding documentation were added to the collection. The Nonresponse Bias Analysis Report is now included for Wave 3.2018-05-01 Wave 1 and Wave 2 Adult and Youth data files were updated to improve the clarity and consistency of variable labels, especially in the Nicotine Dependence section.A new variable was added to Wave 1 and Wave 2 Adult data - R0#_ND_DATA_ROUTE. A second variable was added to the Wave 2 Adult data - R02R_A_P12M_BLUNTONLY_GRILLO. An additional 18 derived variables in the Wave 2 Adult data were revised and replaced the original variables. The newly named variables possess the original name, but also contain "_REV" at the end of the variable name.A skip error was identified in the Wave 2 Adult instrument, which resulted in some respondents being asked two questions when they should not have been. Therefore, the affected items, R02_AG0100CG and R02_AG0100FC, contain some extra data. Notes were added to the annotated instrument and codebook to describe the issue.The User Guide and Questionnaires were also updated to improve understanding of the data files. A Nonresponse Bias Analysis report is now included for Wave 2.2017-06-14 The Wave 1 data files were updated to correct minor errors along with the questionnaires to correct minor typos and clarify specifications. The Wave 2 data files, questionnaires, and codebooks were added to the study collection. Also, the Master Linkage data file was added to facilitate merging respondent records across waves. The User Guide and Master Tobacco Brand and Product Code Guide were expanded to include information about Wave 2.2017-04-27 A minor revision was made to the Wave 1 Adult questionnaire. Two Excel crosswalks, one for Adults and one for Youth, were added to the available documentation to highlight the differences between the Wave 1 and Wave 2 files.2017-04-03 An update was made to internal files to correct an issue with how missing values are displayed online through ICPSR's variables database.2017-01-31 The variable R01X_CB_REGION in both the Wave 1 Adult and Youth/Parent files was updated to correct an error in the value labels. The values for codes 2 and 3 had been inadvertently swapped. The data did not change; only the value labels for codes 2 and 3 have been corrected.2016-11-28 An additional 40 derived variables were added to the end of the Wave 1 Youth / Parent file that are similar to those already in the Wave 1 Adult file. Information for individuals who withdrew from the study is denoted in the datasets by the special missing value -97777. Funding institution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse. United States Department of Health and Human Services. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Tobacco Products.
Availability
Download
This version of the study is no longer available on the web. If you need to acquire this version of the data, you have to contact ICPSR User Support (ICPSR-help@umich.edu).
Alternative Identifiers
  • 36498 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR36498.v2
Publications
  • Seo, Dong-Chul, Kwon, Elizabeth, Lee, Shieun, Seo, JangDong. Using susceptibility measures to prospectively predict ever use of electronic cigarettes among adolescents. Preventive Medicine.130, 2020.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105896 (DOI)
  • Akinkugbe, A.A.. Cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and adolescents' oral health: Findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. JDR Clinical and Translational Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1177/2380084418806870 (DOI)
  • Amroussia, Nada, Pearson, Jennifer L., Gustafsson, Per E.. What drives us apart? Decomposing intersectional inequalities in cigarette smoking by education and sexual orientation among U.S. adults. International Journal for Equity in Health.18, 1092019.
    • ID: 10.1186/s12939-019-1015-1 (DOI)
  • Assari, Shervin, Bazargan, Mohsen. Education level and cigarette smoking: Diminished returns of lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals. Behavioral Sciences.9, (10), 2019.
    • ID: 10.3390/bs9100103 (DOI)
  • Assari, Shervin, Bazargan, Mohsen. Educational attainment and subjective health and well-being; Diminished returns of lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals. Behavioral Sciences.9, (90), 2019.
    • ID: 10.3390/bs9090090 (DOI)
  • Assari, Shervin, Bazargan, Mohsen, Caldwell, Cleopatra H.. Parental educational attainment and chronic medical conditions among American youth; Minorities’ diminished returns. Children.6, (96), 2019.
    • ID: 10.3390/children6090096 (DOI)
  • Assari, Shervin, Boyce, Shanika, Bazargan, Mohsen, Mincy, Ron, Caldwell, H. Cleopatra. Unequal protective effects of parental educational attainment on the body mass index of Black and White youth. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.16, (19), 2019.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph16193641 (DOI)
  • Atuegwu, C.N., Perez, F.M., Oncken, Cheryl, Thacker, Sejal, Mead, L.E., Mortensen, M.E.. Association between regular electronic nicotine product use and self-reported periodontal disease status: Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.16, (7), 12632019.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph16071263 (DOI)
  • Bentivegna, Kathryn, Atuegwu, Nkiruka C., Oncken, Cheryl, Mead, Erin L., Perez, Mario F., Mortensen, Eric M.. E-cigarette use is associated with non-prescribed medication use in adults: Results from the PATH Survey. Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019.
    • ID: 10.1007/s11606-019-05093-5 (DOI)
  • Berry, Kaitlyn M., Fetterman, Jessica L., Benjamin, Emelia J., Bhatnagar, Aruni, Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L., Leventhal, Adam M., Stokes, Andrew. Association of electronic cigarette use with subsequent initiation of tobacco cigarettes in US youths. JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association.2, (2), e187794-e187794.2019.
    • ID: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.7794 (DOI)
  • Berry, Kaitlyn M., Reynolds, Lindsay M., Collins, Jason M., Siegel, Michael B., Fetterman, Jessica L., Hamburg, Naomi M., Bhatnagar, Aruni, Benjamin, Emelia J., Stokes, Andrew. E-cigarette initiation and associated changes in smoking cessation and reduction: The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study, 2013-2015. Tobacco Control.28, 42-49.2019.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-054108 (DOI)
  • Braymiller, Jessica L., Lanza, Stephanie T.. Age-varying associations between e-cigarette, hookah, and marijuana use among young people: Findings from the PATH Study. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Carroll, Dana Mowls, Strayer, Lori, Nardone, Natalie, Pacek, Lauren R., Kozink, Rachel V., Tessier, Katelyn, McClernon, Joseph, Benowitz, Neal, Bickel, Warren K., Hatsukami, Dorothy. Development and piloting testing of an experimental tobacco and nicotine product marketplace. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz195 (DOI)
  • Chen-Sankey, Julia Cen, Unger, Jennifer B., Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Niederdeppe, Jeff, Bernat, Edward, Choi, Kelvin. E-cigarette marketing exposure and subsequent experimentation among youth and young adults. Pediatrics.144, (5), 2019.
    • ID: 10.1542/peds.2019-1119 (DOI)
  • Choi, Kelvin, Rose, Shyanika W., Zhou, Yitong, Rahman, Basmah, Hair, Elizabeth. Exposure to multi-media tobacco marketing and product use among youth: A longitudinal analysis. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz096 (DOI)
  • Cohn, Amy M., Abudayyeh, Haneen, Perreras, Lexie, Peters, Erica N.. Patterns and correlates of the co-use of marijuana with any tobacco and individual tobacco products in young adults from Wave 2 of the PATH Study. Addictive Behaviors.92, 122-127.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.12.025 (DOI)
  • Cohn, Amy M., D'Silva, Joanne. Menthol smoking and subjective response to the first cigarette smoked. Tobacco Regulatory Science.554-566.2019.
    • ID: 10.18001/TRS.5.6.7 (DOI)
  • Cohn, Amy M., Rose, Shyanika W., D'Silva, Joanne, Villanti, Andrea C.. Menthol smoking patterns and smoking perceptions among youth: Findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine.56, (4), e107-e116.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.027 (DOI)
  • Cwalina, Sam N., Majmundar, Anuja, Unger, Jennifer B., Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L., Pentz, Mary Ann. Adolescent menthol cigarette use and risk of nicotine dependence: Findings from the national Population Assessment on Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107715 (DOI)
  • Dai, Hongying, Leventhal, Adam M.. Association of electronic cigarette vaping and subsequent smoking relapse among former smokers. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.199, 10-17.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.01.043 (DOI)
  • Doan, Thi Thanh Tra, Tan, Ken Wei, Dickens, Borame Sue Lee, Lean, Yin Ai, Yang, Qianyu, Cook, Alex R.. Evaluating smoking control policies in the e-cigarette era: A modelling study. Tobacco Control.2019.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2019-054951 (DOI)
  • Fishbein, Howard, Bauer, Dan, Yu, Qilu, Mermelstein, Robin, Jones, Dina, Miller, Amy, Harrell, Melissa, Loukas, Alexandra, Sterling, Kymberle, Colip, Brittany, Mittl, Beth. Harmonizing cigar survey data across TCORS, CTP, and PATH studies: The Cigar Collaborative Research (CCR) group. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz201 (DOI)
  • Ganz, Ollie, Rimal, Rajiv N., Cohn, Amy M., Johnson, Amanda Lee, Delnevo, Cristine D., Horn, Kimberly. Receptivity to tobacco advertising among young adults with internalizing problems: Findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Substance Use and Misuse.2019.
    • ID: 10.1080/10826084.2019.1688349 (DOI)
  • Ganz, Ollie, Rimal, Rajiv N., Johnson, Amanda L., Cohn, Amy M., Horn, Kimberly, Delnevo, Cristine D., Villanti, Andrea C.. Tobacco use and the interplay of internalizing, externalizing and substance use problems: A latent class analysis of data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107686 (DOI)
  • Gathright, Emily C., Wu, Wen-Chih, Scott-Sheldon, Lori. Electronic Cigarette Use Among Heart Failure Patients in the United States. 34th American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Annual Meeting.Portland, OR. 2019.
    • ID: https://journals.lww.com/jcrjournal/Fulltext/2019/09000/AACVPR_34th_Annual_Meeting_Scientific_Abstract.17.aspx#pdf-link (URL)
  • Giovenco, Daniel P., Spillane, Torra E., Baig, Sabeeh A.. Prevalence and correlates of switching to exclusive e-cigarette use among daily smokers: Findings from The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Green, V.R., Conway, K.P., Silveira, M.L.. High-severity disorders linked to tobacco initiation. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.21, (2), 7-8.2019.
    • ID: 10.1002/cpu.30373 (DOI)
  • Hoek, Janet. Exploring Combustible Cigarette Innovations In a Smokefree World. 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/SRNT19_Abstracts.pdf (URL)
  • Hughes, John R., Peters, Erica N., Callas, Peter W., Peasley-Miklus, Catherine, Oga, Emmanuel, Etter, Jean-Francois, Morley, Nicholas. Withdrawal symptoms from e-cigarette abstinence among former smokers: A pre-post clinical trial. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz129 (DOI)
  • Kalkhoran, Sara, Chang, Yuchiao, Rigotti, Nancy A.. E-cigarettes and smoking cessation in smokers with chronic conditions. American Journal of Preventive Medicine.57, (6), 786-791.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.08.017 (DOI)
  • Kalkhoran, Sara, Chang, Yuchiao, Rigotti, Nancy A.. Electronic cigarette use and cigarette abstinence over two years among U.S. smokers in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz114 (DOI)
  • Kumar, Jayaprakash. Exposure to Health Warning Labels on Waterpipe Tobacco Packages: An Application of the Modified Extended Parallel Process Model on Quitting Behavior from Three Waves of the PATH Study. Dissertation, The University of Memphis. 2019.
  • Kwon, Elizabeth. Assessing Nicotine Product Use Trajectories in Youth and Effects of E-cigarette Use on Cigarette Smoking Cessation in Adults. Dissertation, Indiana University. 2019.
  • Kwon, Elizabeth, Seo, Dong-Chul. Using Susceptibility Measures to Prospectively Predict Current Use of Electronic Cigarettes among Adolescents [poster]. The American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.Greenville, SC. 2019.
    • ID: https://newprairiepress.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1048&context=hbr (URL)
  • Lee, JuHan, Striley, Catherine W., Custodero, Carlo, Rocha, Harold A., Salloum, Ramzi G.. Association of pleasant sensations at cigarette smoking initiation with subsequent tobacco product use among U.S. adolescents. Addictive Behaviors.89, 151-155.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.003 (DOI)
  • Lee, P., Fry, J.. Investigating gateway effects using the PATH study. F1000Research.8, 2642019.
    • ID: 10.12688/f1000research.18354.1 (DOI)
  • Lee, Shieun, Han, Dae-Hee, Chow, Angela, Seo, Dong-Chul. A prospective longitudinal relation between elevated use of electronic devices and use of electronic nicotine delivery systems. Addictive Behaviors.98, 2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106063 (DOI)
  • Levy, David T., Yuan, Zhe, Li, Yameng, Mays, Darren, Sanchez-Romero, Luz Maria. An examination of the variation in estimates of e-cigarette prevalence among U.S. adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.16, (17), 2019.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph16173164 (DOI)
  • Li, Dongmei, Sundar, Isaac K., McIntosh, Scott, Ossip, Deborah, Goniewicz, Maciej L., O'Connor, Richard J., Rahman, Irfan. Association of Smoking and Electronic Cigarette Use with Wheezing and Related Respiratory Symptoms in Adults: Cross-sectional Results from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, Wave 2. 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/SRNT19_Abstracts.pdf (URL)
  • Li, Dongmei, Sundar, Isaac K., McIntosh, Scott, Ossip, Deborah, Goniewicz, Maciej L., O'Connor, Richard J., Rahman, Irfan. Association of electronic cigarettes use with wheezing and other respiratory symptoms in adults: Results from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, Wave 2. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Li, Dongmei, Sundar, Isaac, McIntosh, Scott, Ossip, Deborah J., Goniewicz, Maciej L., O'Connor, Richard J., Rahman, Irfan. Association of smoking and electronic cigarette use with wheezing and related respiratory symptoms in adults: Cross-sectional results from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study, wave 2. Tobacco Control.2019.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2018-054694 (DOI)
  • Lin, Hsien-Chang, Hu, Yi-Han, Buu, Anne. Internalizing and Externalizing Problems as Risk Factors for Initiation and Progression of E-cigarette and Combustible Cigarette Use in the U.S. Youth and Young Adult Population [poster]. The American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.Greenville, SC. 2019.
    • ID: https://newprairiepress.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1048&context=hbr (URL)
  • Lin, Wenxue. Knowledge and Perceptions of Harm and Interest in Quitting among Cigarette Smokers and E-Cigarette Users: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Wave 1. Thesis, University of Oklahoma. 2019.
  • McMillen, Robert, Klein, Jonathan D., Wilson, Karen, Winickoff, Jonathan P., Tanski, Susanne. E-cigarette use and future cigarette initiation among never smokers and relapse among former smokers in the PATH study. Public Health Reports.134, (5), 528-536.2019.
    • ID: 10.1177/0033354919864369 (DOI)
  • Mead, Erin L., Cruz-Cano, Raul, Groom, Allison, Hart, Joy L., Walker, Kandi L., Giachello, Aida L., Robertson, Rose Marie, Oncken, Cheryl. Responses to cigarette health warning labels, harm perceptions and knowledge in a national sample of pregnant and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Addictive Behaviors.90, 10-13.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.013 (DOI)
  • Mendez, David, Warner, Kenneth E.. E-cigarettes: Comparing the possible risks of increasing smoking initiation with the potential benefits of increasing smoking cessation. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.21, (1), 41-47.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/nty062 (DOI)
  • Miller, Connor, Smith, Danielle M., Goniewicz, Maciej L.. Physical activity among adolescent tobacco and electronic cigarette users: Cross-sectional findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Preventive Medicine Reports.15, (100897), 2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100897 (DOI)
  • Moran, Meghan B., Soneji, Samir, Tan, Andy S.L., Choi, Kelvin. Associations between exposure and receptivity to branded cigarette advertising and subsequent brand preference among U.S. young adults. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz093 (DOI)
  • Mortensen, Eric, Atuegwu, Nkiruka, Bentivegna, Kathryn, Perez, Mario F., Oncken, Cheryl. Association of E-cig Use and Non-prescribed Medication Use: Results from the PATH Survey. 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine.Washington, DC. 2019.
    • ID: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11606-019-05007-5.pdf (URL)
  • Nguyen, A.B.. Disaggregating Asian American and Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (AANHOPI) adult tobacco use: Findings from Wave 1 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study, 2013-2014. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.2019.
    • ID: 10.1007/s40615-018-00532-1 (DOI)
  • Nicksic, N.E., Snell, L.M., Barnes, A.J.. Reasons to use e-cigarettes among adults and youth in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. Addictive Behaviors.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.01.037 (DOI)
  • Nicksic, Nicole E., Barnes, Andrew J.. Is susceptibility to E-cigarettes among youth associated with tobacco and other substance use behaviors one year later? Results from the PATH study. Preventive Medicine.121, 109-114.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.02.006 (DOI)
  • Noggle, Brendan, Sarkar, Mohamadi, Rosner, Jessica, Black, Ryan. Smokeless Tobacco and Smoking Relative Harm: Beliefs and the Association Between Risk Perception and Tobacco Use Transitions [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/SRNT19_Abstracts.pdf (URL)
  • O'Connell, G., Walele, T., Cahours, X., Thompson, J., Verron, T.. Perceptions of the Relative Harm of Electronic Cigarettes Compared with Smoking in the U.S.A.: Analysis of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Data, 2013-2016 [poster]. 2019 Joint Conference of the Smoke Science and Product Technology Study Groups of CORESTA.Hamburg, Germany. 2019.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/events/SSPT2019-ProgrammesAbstracts_20190913_PrintedVersion.pdf (URL)
  • Osman, Amira, Queen, Tara, Choi, Kelvin, Goldstein, Adam O.. Receipt of direct tobacco mail/email coupons and coupon redemption: Demographic and socioeconomic disparities among adult smokers in the United States. Preventive Medicine.126, 1057782019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105778 (DOI)
  • Perez, F. Mario, Atuegwu, C. Nkiruka, Mead, L. Erin, Oncken, Cheryl, Mortensen, M. Eric. Adult e-cigarettes use associated with a self-reported diagnosis of COPD. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.16, (20), 39382019.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph16203938 (DOI)
  • Quisenberry, Amanda, Doogan, Nathan J., Stanton, Cassandra A., Roberts, Megan, Parker, Maria, Kurti, Allison N., Redner, Ryan R., Lopez, Alexa, Gaalema, Diann, Keith, Diana, Nighbor, Tyler, Cepeda-Benito, Antonio, Higgins, Stephen T.. Advertising receptivity mediates a disparity to progression to regular cigarette use among sexual and gender minorities [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Reed, Mark. The American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 annual scientific meeting: 'Theory and applications of multiple health behavior change'. Health Behavior Research.2, (2), Article 52019.
    • ID: 10.4148/2572-1836.1048 (DOI)
  • Rezk-Hanna, Mary, Toyama, Joy, Ikharo, Ebahi, Brecht, Mary-Lynn, Benowitz, Neal L.. E-hookah versus e-cigarettes: Findings from Wave 2 of the PATH Study (2014-2015). American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.05.007 (DOI)
  • Riehm, Kira E., Feder, Kenneth A., Tormohlen, Kayla N., Crum, Rosa M., Young, Andrea S., Green, Kerry M., Pacek, Lauren R., La Flair, Lareina N., Mojtabai, Ramin. Associations between time spent using social media and internalizing and externalizing problems among US youth. JAMA Psychiatry.2019.
    • ID: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.2325 (DOI)
  • Riehm, Kira E., Rojo-Wissar, Darlynn M., Feder, Kenneth A., Mojtabai, Ramin, Spira, Adam P., Thrul, Johannes, Crum, Rosa M.. E-cigarette use and sleep-related complaints among youth. Journal of Adolescence.76, 48-54.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.08.009 (DOI)
  • Riehm, Kira E., Young, Andrea S., Feder, Kenneth A., Krawczyk, Noa, Tormohlen, Kayla N., Pacek, Lauren R., Mojtabai, Ramin, Crum, Rosa M.. Mental health problems and initiation of e-cigarette and combustible cigarette use. Pediatrics.144, (1), 2019.
    • ID: 10.1542/peds.2018-2935 (DOI)
  • Roberts, W., McKee, S. M.. Does E-cigarette Use Predict Transitions in Risky Drinking? Findings Across 2 Waves of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study [poster]. 42nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism.Minneapolis, MN. 2019.
    • ID: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/acer.14059 (URL)
  • Rose, Shyanika W., Johnson, Amanda L., Glasser, Allison M., Villanti, Andrea C., Ambrose, Bridget K., Conway, Kevin, Cummings, K. Michael, Stanton, Cassandra A., Delnevo, Cristine, Wackowski, Olivia A., Edwards, Kathryn C., Feirman, Shari P., Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Bernat, Jennifer, Holder-Hayes, Enver, Green, Victoria, Silveira, Marushka L., Zhou, Yitong, Abudayyeh, Haneen, Hyland, Andrew. Flavour types used by youth and adult tobacco users in wave 2 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study 2014–2015. Tobacco Control.2019.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2018-054852 (DOI)
  • Schneller, Liane M., Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Goniewicz, Maciej L., McIntosh, Scott, Ossip, Deborah, O'Connor, Richard J.. Use of flavored e-cigarettes and the type of e-cigarette devices used among adults and youth in the US--Results from Wave 3 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study (2015-2016). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.16, (16), 29912019.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph16162991 (DOI)
  • Schneller, Liane M., Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Mahoney, Martin C., O'Connor, Richard J.. Use of mentholated cigarette products and its effect on successful cessation, nicotine dependence and past quit attempts among current adult smokers in the U.S. in the Population Assessment Of Tobacco Health (PATH) Study: Findings from Waves 1 and 2 [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Schneller, Liane Margaret. Assessment of Various Delivery Methods of Menthol in Cigarettes Sold in the US. Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo. 2019.
  • Seaman, Elizabeth L., Stanton, Cassandra A., Edwards, Kathryn C., Halenar, Michael J.. Use of tobacco products/devices for marijuana consumption and association with substance use problems among U.S. young adults (2015-2016). Addictive Behaviors.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106133 (DOI)
  • Simon, Patricia, Buta, Eugenia, Gueorguieva, Ralitza, Kong, Grace, Morean, Meghan E., Camenga, Deepa, Bold, Krysten W., Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra. Transitions across tobacco use profiles among adolescents: Results from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 and Wave 2. Addiction.2019.
    • ID: 10.1111/add.14828 (DOI)
  • Smith, Danielle M., O'Connor, Richard J., Collins, R. Lorraine, Hyland, Andrew J., Kozlowski, Lynn T.. Correlates of smoker identity among intermittent and light daily young adult smokers: Findings from Wave 1 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Addictive Behaviors.98, 2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106034 (DOI)
  • Smith, Danielle, Sakal, Collin, Goniewicz, Maciej. Changes in product use among dual users of tobacco and electronic cigarettes over one year findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Soule, Eric K., Plunk, Andrew D., Harrell, Paul T., Hayes, Rashelle B., Edwards, Kathryn C.. Longitudinal analysis of associations between reasons for electronic cigarette use and change in smoking status among adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz005 (DOI)
  • Sutfin, Erin L., McKelvey, Karma, Soule, Eric, Glasser, Allison, Kim, Hyoshin, Wiseman, Kimberly D., Grana, Rachel. Measuring waterpipe tobacco smoking in survey research. Tobacco Control.2019.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2019-055000 (DOI)
  • Symes, Y.R., Ribisl K.M., Boynton, M.H., Westmaas, J.L., Mayer, D.K., Golden, S.D.. Dual cigarette and e-cigarette use in cancer survivors: An analysis using Population Assessment of Tobacco Health (PATH) data. Journal of Cancer Survivorship.2019.
    • ID: 10.1007/s11764-019-0735-y (DOI)
  • Thrasher, James F., Lozano, Paula, Yang, Huizhong, Cho, Yoojin, Moodie, Crawford. Prevalence and Correlates of Flavor Capsule Use in the United States: Results from National Surveys of Adolescents and Young Adults, 2013-2016. 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/SRNT19_Abstracts.pdf (URL)
  • Usidame, Bukola, Prom-Wormley, Elizabeth. Understanding the effect of tobacco marketing on the association between opinions and tobacco use in adults over 55 [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Veliz, Philip, Eisman, Andria, McCabe, Sean Esteban, Evans-Polce, Rebecca, McCabe, Vita V., Boyd, Carol J.. E-cigarette use, polytobacco use, and longitudinal changes in tobacco and substance use disorder symptoms among U.S. adolescents. Journal of Adolescent Health.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.05.026 (DOI)
  • Verplaetse, Terril L., Moore, Kelly E., Pittman, Brian P., Roberts, Walter, Oberleitner, Lindsay M., Peltier, MacKenzie R., Hacker, Robyn, Cosgrove, Kelly P., McKee, Sherry A.. Intersection of e-cigarette use and gender on transitions in cigarette smoking status: Findings across waves 1 and 2 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.21, (10), 1423-1428.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/nty187 (DOI)
  • Vora, Manali V., Chaffee, Benjamin W.. Tobacco-use patterns and self-reported oral health outcomes: A cross-sectional assessment of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health study, 2013-2014. Journal of the American Dental Association.2019.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.adaj.2018.12.004 (DOI)
  • Watkins, Shannon L., Thrul, Johannes, Max, Wendy, Ling, Pamela. Cold turkey and hot vapes? A national study of young adult cigarette cessation strategies. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/nty270 (DOI)
  • Weinberger, Andrea H., Delnevo, Cristine D., Wyka, Katarzyna, Gbedemah, Misato, Lee, Joun, Copeland, Jan, Goodwin, Renee D.. Cannabis use is associated with increased risk of cigarette smoking initiation, persistence, and relapse among adults in the US. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2019.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntz085 (DOI)
  • Weinberger, Andrea H., Goodwin, Renee. Cannabis use and increased risk of cigarette smoking initiation, persistence, and relapse among adults in the United States: Data from two waves of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. 2019 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
  • Wong, Su-Wei. Perceptions and Gateway Effect of E-cigarette Use among U.S. Adults [poster]. Dissertation, Indiana University. 2019.
  • Xiao, Connie, Heley, Kathryn, Kennedy, Ryan D., Lagasse, Lisa, Moran, Meghan B.. Sociodemographic differences in reasons for ENDS use among US youth within Wave 2 of the PATH study. Tobacco Induced Diseases.17, (4), 2019.
    • ID: 10.18332/tid/99879 (DOI)
  • Zhu, Shu-Hong, Zhuang, Yue-Lin, Sun, Jessica Y., Cummins, Sharon E.. The Popularity of Electronic Cigarette Brands Among California Youth [poster]. 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.San Francisco, CA. 2019.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/SRNT19_Abstracts.pdf (URL)
  • Chang, Yen-Chang, Lee, Yen-Han, Liu, Ching-Ti, Shelley, Mack. Patterns of e-cigarette use and self-reported health outcomes among smokers and non-smokers in the United States: A preliminary assessment. Journal of Substance Use.24, (1), 79-87.2018.
    • ID: 10.1080/14659891.2018.1510053 (DOI)
  • Choi, Kelvin, Soneji, Samir, Tan, Andy S.L.. Receipt of tobacco direct mail coupons and changes in smoking status in a nationally representative sample of US adults. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.20, (9), 1095-1100.2018.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntx141 (DOI)
  • Choi, Namkee G., DiNitto, Diana M., Marti, C. Nathan. Marijuana use among adults: Initiation, return to use, and continued use versus quitting over a one-year follow-up period. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.182, 19-26.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.006 (DOI)
  • Choi, Namkee G., DiNitto, Diana M., Marti, C.N.. A longitudinal assessment of change in marijuana use with other substance use problems. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.3, 1-11.2018.
    • ID: 10.1080/00952990.2018.1461879 (DOI)
  • Cohn, Amy M., Johnson, Amanda L., Rose, Shyanika W., Pearson, Jennifer L., Villanti, Andrea C., Stanton, Cassandra. Population-level patterns and mental health and substance use correlates of alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco use and co-use in US young adults and adults: Results from the population assessment for tobacco and health. American Journal on Addictions.27, (6), 491-500.2018.
    • ID: 10.1111/ajad.12766 (DOI)
  • Cohn, Amy M., Rose, Shyanika W., Ilakkuvan, Vinu, Gray, Tiffany, Curry, Laurel, Villanti, Andrea C., Mays, Darren, Lindblom, Eric, Tercyak, Kenneth, Debnam, Charles, Mayo, Ashley, Perreras, Lexie. Harm perceptions of menthol and nonmenthol cigarettes differ by brand, race/ethnicity, and gender in US adult smokers: Results from PATH Wave 1. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2018.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntx277 (DOI)
  • Do, Elizabeth K., Green, Tiffany L., Prom-Wormley, Elizabeth C., Fuemmeler, Bernard F.. Social determinants of smoke exposure during pregnancy: Findings from waves 1 & 2 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Preventive Medicine Reports.12, 312-320.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.10.020 (DOI)
  • Dunbar, Zachary R., Das, Ananth, O'Connor, Richard J., Goniewicz, Maciej L., Wei, Binnian, Travers, Mark J.. Brief report: Lead levels in selected electronic cigarettes from Canada and the United States. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.15, (1), 1542018.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph15010154 (DOI)
  • Glasser, Allison M., Johnson, Amanda L., Mayo, Ashley, Ganz, Ollie T., Harvey, Emily, Cantrell, Jennifer, Rose, Shyanika. Correlates of Cigar Brand Use among US Youth, Young Adults and Adults from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study (2013-2014). American Academy of Health Behavior 18th Annual Scientific Meeting.Portland, OR. 2018.
  • Harrell, Melissa, Quisenberry, Amanda, Barrington-Trimis, Jessica, Soneji, Samir. Exploring Use and Preference of E-Cigarette Flavors Among Adolescents, Young Adults, and Adults. 2018 Annual Meeting of Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.Baltimore, MD. 2018.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/conferences/2018_Annual_Meeting/65388_SRNT_2018_Abstract_fin.pdf (URL)
  • Hughes, John R., Callas, Peter W.. Prevalence of withdrawal symptoms from electronic cigarette cessation: A cross-sectional analysis of the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health. Addictive Behaviors.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.07.002 (DOI)
  • Kalkhoran, Sara, Kruse, Gina R., Chang, Yuchiao, Rigotti, Nancy A.. Smoking-cessation efforts by US adult smokers with medical comorbidities. American Journal of Medicine.131, (3), 318.e1-318.e8.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.09.025 (DOI)
  • Kim, Mimi, Sembower, Mark A., Shiffman, Saul. Comparisons of Dependence on Cigarettes and E-cigarettes: Data from the PATH Study [poster]. 72nd Tobacco Science Research Conference.Memphis, TN. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/abstracts/2018_TSRC30_Kim.pdf (URL)
  • King, Jessica L., Reboussin, Beth A., Cornacchione Ross, Jennifer, Sutfin, Erin L.. Waterpipe tobacco package warning exposure's impact on risk perceptions and use among young adults in the USA: A longitudinal analysis of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Tobacco Control.tobaccocontrol-2018-2018.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2018-054562 (DOI)
  • Kurti, A.N., Bunn, J.Y., Villanti, A.C., Stanton, C.A., Redner, R., Lopez, A.A., Gaalema, D.E., Doogan, N.J., Cepeda-Benito, A., Roberts, M.E., Phillips, J.K., Quisenbery, A.J., Keith, D.R., Higgins, S.T.. Patterns of single and multiple tobacco product use among U.S. women of reproductive age. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.20, (Suppl 1), S71-S80.2018.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/nty024 (DOI)
  • Kurti, Allison N., Bunn, Janice Y., Nighbor, Tyler, Cohen, Alex H., Bolívar, Hypatia, Tang, Katherine J., Dallery, Jesse, Higgins, Stephen T.. Leveraging technology to address the problem of cigarette smoking among women of reproductive age. Preventive Medicine.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.004 (DOI)
  • Kurti, Allison N., Redner, Ryan, Bunn, Janice Y., Tang, Katherine, Nighbor, Tyler, Lopez, Alexa A., Keith, Diana R., Villanti, Andrea C., Stanton, Cassandra A., Gaalema, Diann E., Doogan, Nathan J., Cepeda-Benito, Antonio, Roberts, Megan E., Phillips, Julie, Parker, Maria A., Quisenberry, Amanda J., Higgins, Stephen T.. Examining the relationship between pregnancy and quitting use of tobacco products in a U.S. national sample of women of reproductive age. Preventive Medicine.117, 52-60.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.08.019 (DOI)
  • Kwon, Elizabeth, Seo, Dong-Chul, Lin, Hsien-Chang. Predictors of Youth E-cigarette Use and Susceptibility in the US. American Academy of Health Behavior 18th Annual Scientific Meeting.Portland, OR. 2018.
  • Kwon, Elizabeth, Seo, Dong-Chul, Lin, Hsien-Chang, Chen, Zhongxue. Predictors of youth e-cigarette use susceptibility in a U.S. nationally representative sample. Addictive Behaviors.82, 79-85.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.02.026 (DOI)
  • Kypriotakis, George, Robinson, Jason D., Green, Charles E., Cinciripini, Paul M.. Patterns of tobacco product use and correlates among adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study: A latent class analysis. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.20, (1), S81-S87.2018.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/nty025 (DOI)
  • Lopez, Alexa A., Redner, Ryan, Kurti, Allison N., Keith, Diana R., Villanti, Andrea C., Stanton, Cassandra A., Gaalema, Diann E., Bunn, Janice Y., Doogan, Nathan J., Cepeda-Benito, Antonio, Roberts, Megan E., Higgins, Stephen T.. Tobacco and nicotine delivery product use in a U.S. national sample of women of reproductive age. Preventive Medicine.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.03.001 (DOI)
  • McMillen, R., Tanski, S., Wilson, K., Klein, J.D., Winickoff, J.P.. Adolescent use of different E-cigarette products. Pediatrics.142, (4), 1-8.2018.
    • ID: 10.1542/peds.2018-0260 (DOI)
  • Merianos, Ashley L., Jandarov, Roman A., Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda. Adolescent tobacco smoke exposure, respiratory symptoms, and emergency department use. Pediatrics.2018.
    • ID: 10.1542/peds.2018-0266 (DOI)
  • Moran, Meghan Bridgid, Heley, Kathryn, Pierce, John P., Niaura, Ray, Strong, David, Abrams, David. Ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in recalled exposure to and self-reported impact of tobacco marketing and promotions. Health Communication.1-10.2018.
    • ID: 10.1080/10410236.2017.1407227 (DOI)
  • Muhammad-Kah, Raheema, Pithawalla, Yezdi. B., Hannel, Thaddeus, Wei, Lai, Black, Ryan, Bryan, Thomas, Gogova, Maria. Assessing the Potential Population Health Impact of Market Authorization of E-cigarettes in the U.S. [poster]. CORESTA Congress.Kunming, China. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/abstracts/2018_STPOST57_Muhammad-KahPithawalla.pdf (URL)
  • Parker, Maria A., Villanti, Andrea C., Quisenberry, Amanda J., Stanton, Cassandra A., Doogan, Nathan J., Redner, Ryan, Gaalema, Diann E., Kurti, Allison N., Nighbor, Tyler, Roberts, Megan E., Cepeda-Benito, Antonio, Higgins, Stephen T.. Tobacco product harm perceptions and new use. Pediatrics.142, (6), e201815052018.
    • ID: 10.1542/peds.2018-1505 (DOI)
  • Perez, M.F., Atuegwu, N., Mead, E., Oncken, C., Mortensen, E.M.. E-Cigarette Use Is Associated with Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis and COPD. Cutting Edge Research in Smoking Cessation and E-Cigarettes [poster].San Diego, CA. 2018.
  • Perry, Cheryl L., Perez, Adriana, Bluestein, Meagan, Garza, Nicholas, Obinwa, Udoka, Jackson, Christian, Clendennen, Stephanie L., Loukas, Alexandra, Harrell, Melissa B.. Youth or young adults: Which group is at highest risk for tobacco use onset?. Journal of Adolescent Health.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.04.011 (DOI)
  • Rodu, Brad, Plurphanswat, Nantaporn. E-cigarette use among US adults: Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Nicotine and Tobacco Research.20, (8), 940-948.2018.
    • ID: 10.1093/ntr/ntx194 (DOI)
  • Schneller, Liane M., Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Goniewicz, Maciej L., McIntosh, Scott, Ossip, Deborah, O'Connor, Richard J.. Use of flavored electronic cigarette refill liquids among adults and youth in the US - Results from Wave 2 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study (2014-2015). PLOS One.13, (8), e02027442018.
    • ID: 10.1371/journal.pone.0202744 (DOI)
  • Unger, Jennifer B., Bartsch, Lauren. Exposure to tobacco websites: Associations with cigarette and e-cigarette use and susceptibility among adolescents. Addictive Behaviors.78, 120-123.2018.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.11.012 (DOI)
  • Verron, T., Guo, M., Varignon, B., O'Connell, G., Walele, T., Cahours, X.. Misperception of E-cigarette Harm Growing among American Adults, 2013-2015: Analysis of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Data, 2013-2015. CORESTA Congress.Kunming, China. 2018.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/abstracts/2018_ST25_Verron.pdf (URL)
  • D'Angelo, Heather, Sharma, Eva, Ross, Kathryn, Carusi, Charles, Stanton, Cassandra, Taylor, Kristie. Youth Exposure to Tobacco Industry Branded Sweepstakes Ads and Coupons: Prevalence and Associations with Susceptibility and Tobacco Product Use in Wave 1 of the PATH Study. Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco's 23rd Annual Meeting.Florence, Italy. 2017.
  • Emory, Kristen, Trinidad, Dennis. Striking national-level disparities in LGB tobacco use. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.51, (1), S310-S311.2017.
    • ID: 10.1007/s12160-017-9903-3 (DOI)
  • Hyland, Andrew, Ambrose, Bridget K., Conway, Kevin P., Borek, Nicolette, Lambert, Elizabeth, Carusi, Charles, Taylor, Kristie, Crosse, Scott, Fong, Geoffrey T., Cummings, K. Michael, Abrams, David, Pierce, John P., Sargent, James, Messer, Karen, Bansal-Travers, Maansi, Niaura, Ray, Vallone, Donna, Hammond, David, Hilmi, Nahla, Kwan, Jonathan, Piesse, Andrea, Kalton, Graham, Lohr, Sharon, Pharris-Ciurej, Nick, Castleman, Victoria, Green, Victoria R., Tessman, Greta, Kaufman, Annette, Lawrence, Charles, van Bemmel, Dana M., Kimmel, Heather L., Blount, Ben, Yang, Ling, O'Brien, Barbara, Tworek, Cindy, Alberding, Derek, Hull, Lynn C., Cheng, Yu-Ching, Maklan, David, Backinger, Cathy L., Compton, Wilson M.. Design and methods of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Tobacco Control.26, 371-378.2017.
    • ID: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-052934 (DOI)
  • Kalkhoran, Sara, Kruse, Gina R., Rigotti, Nancy A.. Smoking Cessation Behaviors Among Adult Smokers With Chronic Medical Conditions in the United States. 2017 Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting.Washington, DC. 2017.
    • ID: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11606-017-4028-8.pdf (URL)
  • Kim, Mimi, Sembower, Mark A., Shiffman, Saul, Curtin, Geoffrey M.. Flavored E-cigarette Use Among U.S. Adults: Results from Two National Surveys. 71st Tobacco Science Research Conference.Bonita Springs, FL. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/abstracts/2017_TSRC111_Kim.pdf (URL)
  • Kurti, A.N., Redner, R., Lopez, A.A., Keith, D.R., Villanti, A.C., Stanton, C.A., Gaalema, D.E., Bunn, J.Y., Doogan, N.J., Cepeda-Benito, A., Roberts, M.E., Phillips, J., Higgins, S.T.. Tobacco and nicotine delivery product use in a national sample of pregnant women. Preventive Medicine.104, 50-56.2017.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.07.030 (DOI)
  • Liu, Guodong, Wasserman, Emily, Kong, Lan, Foulds, Jonathan. A comparison of nicotine dependence among exclusive E-cigarette and cigarette users in the PATH study. Preventive Medicine.2017.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.001 (DOI)
  • Martinez, Diane, Turner, Monique, Roche, Kathleen, Horn, Kimberly. Integrated Health Behavior Models Illustrate How Positive Attitudes and Low Risk Perceptions Drive Young Adult E-Cigarette Use [poster]. GW Annual Research Days.Washington, DC. 2017.
  • Osibogun, Olatokunbo, Jaber, Rana, Bahelah, Raed, Taleb, Ziyad B., Maziak, Wasim. Poly-tobacco use among young adults in the United States: Findings from the Population Assessment on Tobacco and Health Study, 2013-2014. Annals of Epidemiology.27, (8), 5352017.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.07.053 (DOI)
  • Rodu, B., Plurphanswat, N.. Quit methods used by American smokers, 2013-2014. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.14, (11), e14032017.
    • ID: 10.3390/ijerph14111403 (DOI)
  • Ross, Kathryn, D'Angelo, Heather, Sharma, Eva, Taylor, Kristie, Carusi, Charles, Stanton, Cassandra. Reasons for E-cigarette Use Among Adult Dual Users: Relationship to Quitting/Harm Reduction Behavior in Wave 1 of the PATH Study. Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco's 23rd Annual Meeting.Florence, Italy. 2017.
  • Sharma, Eva, Stanton, Cassandra, D'Angelo, Heather, Ross, Kathryn, Castleman, Victoria, Carusi, Charles, Taylor, Kristie. Correlates of Exclusive Hookah Use and Dual Use Among US Young Adults from Wave 1 of the PATH Study. Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco's 23rd Annual Meeting.Florence, Italy. 2017.
  • Shiffman, Saul, Sembower, Mark, Kim, Mimi, Curtin, Geoffrey M.. Flavored E-cigarette Use among Adults: Results from Two US Surveys. CORESTA Smoke-Techno Joint Study Groups Meeting (SSPT2017).Kitzbuhel, Austria. 2017.
    • ID: https://www.coresta.org/sites/default/files/abstracts/2017_ST50_Shiffman.pdf (URL)
  • Siegfried, Yumiko, Morganstein, David, Piesse, Andrea, Lohr, Sharon. Why Independent Surveys with the Same Objective Yield Different Estimates. Survey Research Methods Section.Baltimore, MD. 2017.
    • ID: https://ww2.amstat.org/sections/srms/Proceedings/y2017/files/593857.pdf (URL)
  • Villanti, Andrea. Are Youth and Young Adults Who First Try a Flavored Tobacco Product More Likely to Continue Using Tobacco? Findings from the PATH Study. 23rd Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.Florence, Italy. 2017.
  • Zhang, Nannan. Factors Associated with E-cigarette Use: Analysis of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Thesis, Georgia State University. 2017.
    • ID: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1598&context=iph_theses (URL)
  • van Dorn, Aaron. The PATH to smoking cessation in the USA. Lancet.5, (3), 1702017.
    • ID: 10.1016/S2213-2600(17)30049-8 (DOI)
  • O'Connor, Richard J., Villanti, Andrea C., Strong, David R., Harrell, Melissa B.. What we know about appeal: Implications for product regulation. 2016 Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Annual Meeting.. 2016.
    • ID: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.srnt.org/resource/resmgr/Conferences/2016_Annual_Meeting/Program/SRNT_2016_Rapids_WEB2.pdf (URL)
  • Pearson, Jennifer, Johnson, Amanda, Johnson, Sarah, Stanton, Cassandra, Villanti, Andrea, Niaura, Raymond, Glasser, Allison, Wang, Baoguang, Abrams, David, Cummings, Michael, Hyland, Andrew. Adult Interest in Tobacco Products Claiming Reduced Harm: Findings from Wave 1 of the PATH Study. 2016 Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Annual Meeting.Chicago, IL. 2016.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2016.
    • ID: https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/documents/2016_sgr_full_report_non-508.pdf (URL)

Update Metadata: 2019-11-21 | Issue Number: 15 | Registration Date: 2016-08-01

United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse; United States Department of Health and Human Services. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Tobacco Products (2016): Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study [United States] Public-Use Files. Version 1. Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Series. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36498.v1