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National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART), 1999

Version
v2
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Hammer, Heather
  • Sedlak, Andrea J.
  • Finkelhor, David
Other Title
  • NISMART-2 (Alternative Title)
  • Version 2 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2007-07-19
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
children; drug use; family relationships; juveniles; kidnapping; missing children
Description
  • Abstract

    The National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART) were undertaken in response to the mandate of the 1984 Missing Children's Assistance Act (Pub.L. 98-473) that requires the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to conduct periodic national incidence studies to determine the actual number of children reported missing and the number of missing children who are recovered for a given year. The first such study, NISMART-1 (NATIONAL INCIDENCE STUDIES OF MISSING, ABDUCTED, RUNAWAY, AND THROWNAWAY CHILDREN (NISMART), 1988 [ICPSR 9682]), was conducted from 1988 to 1989 and addressed this mandate by defining major types of missing child episodes and estimating the number of children who experienced missing child episodes of each type in 1988. At that time, the lack of a standardized definition of a "missing child" made it impossible to provide a single estimate of missing children. As a result, one of the primary goals of NISMART-2 was to develop a standardized definition and provide unified estimates of the number of missing children in the United States. Both NISMART-1 and NISMART-2 comprise several component datasets designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the population of children who experienced qualifying episodes, with each component focusing on a different aspect of the missing child population. The Household Survey -- Youth Data and the Household Survey -- Adult Data (Parts 1-2) are similar but separate surveys, one administered to the adult primary caretaker of the children in the sampled household and the other to a randomly selected household youth aged 10 through 18 at the time of interview. The Juvenile Facilities Data on Runaways (Part 3) sought to estimate the number of runaways from juvenile residential facilities in order to supplement the household survey estimate of the number of runaways from households. And the Law Enforcement Study Data, by case perpetrator, and victim, (Parts 4-6) intended to estimate the number of children who were victims of stereotypical kidnappings and to obtain a sample of these cases for in-depth study.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Part 1: 35 percent. Part 2: 61 percent. Part 3: The JFS response rate for the institution-level interview was 100 percent. A total of 74 facility-level interviews were completed from the 75 sampled facilities. Three of the sampled facilities were found to be non-operational (hence ineligible), while a fourth sampled facility actually consisted of three separate juvenile residential facilities, all of which were included in the study. Thus, all in-scope facilities participated in the facility-level interviews. The JFS response rate for the episode-level interview was 93 percent. A total of 116 episode-level interviews were targeted. Episode-level interviews were successfully completed for 108 of these targeted episodes, yielding a 93 percent completion rate. Parts 4-6: Phase 1 mail survey -- 91 percent, and Phase 2 followup telephone interview -- 99.3 percent. Overall -- 90.6 percent.
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Household Survey - Youth
    • DS2: Household Survey - Adult
    • DS3: Juvenile Facilities Data on Runaways
    • DS4: Law Enforcement Data - Case
    • DS5: Law Enforcement Data - Perpetrator
    • DS6: Law Enforcement Data - Victim
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 1997--1999
  • 1997 / 1999
  • Collection date: 1998--1999
  • 1998 / 1999
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Parts 1-2: Households with at least one child aged 18 or younger who had lived in the house for two consecutive weeks in the 12 months prior to screening. Part 3: All group homes, juvenile detention centers, residential treatment centers, and runaway and homeless youth shelters serving the selected counties. Parts 4-6: All law enforcement agencies serving the selected counties.
Sampling
Parts 1-2: A list-assisted RDD (Random Digit Dial) methodology was used to select a nationally representative sample of telephone households from the GENESYS Sampling System frame. Typically, a list-assisted RDD design is a one-stage random selection process resulting in equal probabilities of selection (EPSEM) design and no clustering, with each household treated as a Primary Sampling Unit (PSU). A detailed description of the sampling design is in HOUSEHOLD SURVEY METHODS TECHNICAL REPORT which is included in this data collection. Part 3: A stratified, two-stage sample design was applied. In the first stage, 30 Primary Sampling Units (PSUs) were sampled from a listing of the national universe of counties and groups of small, adjacent counties. The PSUs were selected with probability proportionate to the number of children (aged 0 to 17) according to the 1990 Census. Within the 30 PSUs, a total of 922 eligible facilities were identified. This frame was stratified by type of facility, and 75 facilities were sampled with probability proportionate to size (PPS), using weighted capacity as the measure of size. Parts 4-6: Nationally representative sample of 400 counties. Counties were selected with probabilities proportional to size.
Collection Mode
  • computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI)
  • telephone audio computer-assisted self interview (TACASI)
  • telephone interview
Note
2018-02-13 2017-12-12 Due to confidentiality concerns, these data have been re-released as restricted use. A public use version may be available at a future date. Funding insitution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (1995-MC-CX-K004).
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 4566 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is new version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR04566.v1
Publications
  • Oreski, Dijana, Oreski, Stjepan, Klicek, Bozidar. Effects of dataset characteristics on the performance of feature selection techniques. Applied Soft Computing.52, 109-119.2017.
    • ID: 10.1016/j.asoc.2016.12.023 (DOI)
  • Wiseman, Jane. Incidence and Prevalence of Sexual Offending. Sex Offender Management Assessment and Planning Initiative.NCJ 247059, Washington, DC: Office of Justice Programs, Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking. 2014.
    • ID: http://www.smart.gov/SOMAPI/printerFriendlyPDF/adult-sec1.pdf (URL)
  • Simmons, Clara. Representation of Missing Children in National Television News. Thesis, West Virginia University. 2013.
  • Taylor, Justine, Boisvert, Danielle, Sims, Barbara, Garver, Carl. An examination of gender and age in print media accounts of child abductions. Criminal Justice Studies.26, (2), 151-167.2013.
    • ID: 10.1080/1478601X.2012.724683 (DOI)
  • Williams, Michael J.. Exploring Prospective Predictors of Child Abduction by Parent. University of Nevada, Reno, . 2012.
  • Lampinen, James Michael, Arnal, Jack D., Culbertson-Faegre, Amber, Sweeney, Lindsey. Missing and abducted children. Protecting Children from Violence: Evidence-Based Interventions.New York, NY: Psychology Press. 2011.
  • Taylor, Justine, Boisvert, Danielle, Sims, Barbara, Garver, Carl. An Examination of Media Accounts of Child Abductions in the United States. Justice Policy Journal.82, (2), 1-26.2011.
    • ID: http://www.cjcj.org/files/An_Examination.pdf (URL)
  • Taylor, Justine. An Examination of Media Accounts of Child Abductions in the United States. Thesis, . 2010.
  • Finkelhor, David, Hammer, Heather, Sedlak, Andrea J.. Sexually Assaulted Children: National Estimates and Characteristics. OJJDP NISMART Bulletin Series.NCJ 214383, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2008.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/214383.pdf (URL)
  • Hammer, Heather, Finkelhor, David, Ormrod, Richard K., Sedlak, Andrea J., Bruce, Carol. Caretaker Satisfaction with Law Enforcement Response to Missing Children. OJJDP NISMART Bulletin Series.NCJ 217909, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2008.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/217909.pdf (URL)
  • Finkelhor, David. Developmental Victimology: The Comprehensive Study of Childhood Victimization. Victims of Crime (3rd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 2007.
    • ID: http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/pdf/CV142L.pdf (URL)
  • Plass, Peggy S.. Secondary victimizations in missing child events. American Journal of Criminal Justice.32, (1-2), 30-44.2007.
    • ID: 10.1007/s12103-007-9008-9 (DOI)
  • Muschert, Glenn W., Young-Spillers, Melissa, Carr, Dawn. 'Smart' Policy Decisions to Combat a Social Problem: The Case of Child Abductions 2002-2003. Justice Policy Journal.3, (2), 2006.
    • ID: http://www.cjcj.org/uploads/cjcj/documents/smart_policy.pdf (URL)
  • Barr, Michael K.. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Public Data User's Guide. NCJ 211387, . 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211387NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Hammer, Heather, Barr, Michael K.. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Household Survey Methodology. Technical Report.NCJ 211385, . 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211385NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Sedlak, Andrea, Finkelhor, David, Hammer, Heather. National Estimates of Children Missing Involunarily or for Benign Reasons. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.NCJ 206180, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2005.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/206180.pdf (URL)
  • Temple University, Institute for Survey Research. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Adult and Youth Questionnaires. NCJ 211391, . 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211391NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Temple University, Institute for Survey Research. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Data List and Descriptives. NCJ 211386, . 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211386NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Temple University, Institute for Survey Research. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Frequency Codebook Adult Data Screening and Primary Interviews. (NCJ 211389), 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211389NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Temple University, Institute for Survey Research. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Interviewer Manual. NCJ 211388, . 2005.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211388NCJRS.pdf (URL)
  • Hammer, Heather, Finkelhor, David, Sedlak, Andrea J., Porcellini, Lorraine E.. National Estimates of Missing Children: Selected Trends, 1988-1999. NISMART: National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children.NCJ 206179, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2004.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/206179.pdf (URL)
  • Shutt, J. Eagle, Miller, J. Mitchell, Schreck, Christopher J., Brown, Nancy K.. Reconsidering the leading myths of stranger child abduction. Criminal Justice Studies.17, (1), 127-134.2004.
    • ID: 10.1080/0888431042000217688 (DOI)
  • Finkelhor, David, Hammer, Heather, Sedlak, Andrea J.. Nonfamily Abducted Children National Estimates and Characteristics. OJJDP NISMART Bulletin Series.NCJ 196467, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/196467.pdf (URL)
  • Hammer, Heather, Finkelhor, David, Sedlak, Andrea J.. Children Abducted by Family Members: National Estimates and Characteristics. NISMART.NCJ 196466, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/196466.pdf (URL)
  • Hammer, Heather, Sedlak, Andrea J., Finkelhor, David. Runaway/Thrownaway Children: National Estimates and Characteristics. NISMART.NCJ 196469, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/196469.pdf (URL)
  • National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Personal Safety for Children: A Guide for Parents. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.missingkids.com/en_US/publications/NC122.pdf (URL)
  • OJJ. NISMART Questions and Answers. OJJDP NISMART Fact Sheet.NCJ 196760, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/fs196760.pdf (URL)
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquecy Prevention. NISMART Questions and Answers. NCJ 196760, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/fs196760.pdf (URL)
  • Sedlak, Andrea J., Finkelhor, David, Hammer, Heather, Schultz, Dana. National Estimates of Missing Children: An Overview. NISMART.NCJ 196465, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002.
    • ID: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/196465.pdf (URL)
  • Hanson, Louise. Second Comprehensive Study of Missing Children. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.NCJ 179085, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2000.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/179085.pdf (URL)
  • Snyder, Howard N., Sickmund, Melissa. Juvenile Offenders and Victims. 1999 National Report.NCJ 178257, Washington, DC: United States Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 1999.
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. OJJDP Annual Report. Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 1998.
    • ID: http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/pubs/annualreport98/contents.html (URL)
  • Temple University, Institute for Survey Research. NISMART-2 Household Survey: Adult and Youth Follow-Up Questionnaire Matrix and Questionnaire Errata . NCJ 211390, . 1995.
    • ID: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/Digitization/211390NCJRS.pdf (URL)

Update Metadata: 2018-02-13 | Issue Number: 3 | Registration Date: 2017-12-12

Hammer, Heather; Sedlak, Andrea J.; Finkelhor, David (2007): National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART), 1999. Version 2. Version: v2. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04566.v2