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Mortality in Five American Cities in the 19th and 20th Centuries, 1800-1930

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : aggregate data, census/enumeration data
Creator
  • Haines, Michael R.
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2018-11-14
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
birth rates; census data; demographic characteristics; infant mortality; mortality rates; population characteristics; slave populations
Description
  • Abstract

    This collection contains five modified data sets with mortality, population, and other demographic information for five American cities (Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; New Orleans, Louisiana; New York City (Manhattan only), New York; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) from the early 19th century to the early 20th century. Mortality was represented by an annual crude death rate (deaths per 1000 population per year). The population was linearly interpolated from U.S. Census data and state census data (for Boston and New York City). All data sets include variables for year, total deaths, census populations, estimated annual linearly interpolated populations, and crude death rate. The Baltimore data set (DS0001) also provides birth and death rate variables based on race and slave status demographics, as well as a variable for stillbirths. The Philadelphia data set (DS0005) also includes variables for total births, total infant deaths, crude birth rate, and infant deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • Abstract

    This collection contains five modified data sets with mortality, population, and other demographic information for five American cities (Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; New Orleans, Louisiana; New York City (Manhattan only), New York; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) from the early 19th century to the early 20th century.
  • Methods

    Mortality was represented by an annual crude death rate (deaths per 1000 population per year). The population was linearly interpolated from U.S. Census data and state census data (for Boston and New York City).
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Created online analysis version with question text..
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Baltimore, Maryland
    • DS2: Boston, Massachusetts
    • DS3: New Orleans, Louisiana
    • DS4: Manhattan, New York
    • DS5: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 1800--1930
  • 1800 / 1930
  • Collection date: 1810--1920
  • 1810 / 1920
  • Collection date: 1810--1920
  • 1810 / 1920
  • Collection date: 1810--1910
  • 1810 / 1910
  • Collection date: 1800--1910
  • 1800 / 1910
  • Collection date: 1800--1930
  • 1800 / 1930
Geographic Coverage
  • Baltimore
  • Boston
  • Louisiana
  • Manhattan (New York City)
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • New Orleans
  • New York (state)
  • Pennsylvania
  • Philadelphia
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Mortality rates in Baltimore, Maryland, Boston, Massachusetts, New Orleans, Louisiana, Manhattan, New York, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between 1800 and 1930.
Availability
Download
This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions via web download.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 37155 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)

Update Metadata: 2018-11-14 | Issue Number: 1 | Registration Date: 2018-11-14

Haines, Michael R. (2018): Mortality in Five American Cities in the 19th and 20th Centuries, 1800-1930. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37155.v1