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Stress in America, United States, 2007-2018

Version
v0
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • American Psychological Association
Other Title
  • Archival Version (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2019-06-24
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
ethnicity; gender; parenting skills; parents; race; religion; stress; workplaces
Description
  • Abstract

    Since 2007, the American Psychological Association (APA) has commissioned an annual nationwide survey as part of it's Mind/Body Health campaign to examine the state of stress across the country and understand its impact. The Stress in America survey measures attitudes and perceptions of stress among the general public and identifies leading sources of stress, common behaviors used to manage stress and the impact of stress on our lives. The results of the survey draw attention to the serious physical and emotional implications of stress and the inextricable link between the mind and body. From 2007 to 2018 the research has documented this connection among the general public as well as various sub-segments of the public. Each year, the Stress in America surveys aims to uncover different aspects of the stress/health connection via focusing on a particular topic and/or subgroup of the population. Below is a list of the focus of each of the Stress in America surveys. 2007-2018 Cumulative Dataset; 2007 General Population; 2008 Gender and Stress; 2009 Parent Perceptions of Children's Stress; 2010 Health Impact of Stress on Children and Families; 2011 Our Health Risk; 2012 Missing the Health Care Connection; 2013 Are Teens Adopting Adults' Stress Habits; 2014 Paying With Our Health; 2015 The Impact of Discrimination; 2016 Coping with Change, Part 1; 2016 Coping with Change, Part 2: Technology and Social Media; 2017 The State of Our Nation; 2018 Stress and Generation Z;
  • Methods

    The Stress in America survey has been conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association (APA) since 2007. Respondents for the surveys were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Poll surveys. Unless otherwise noted, interviews were conducted in English.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: Because the sample is based on those who were invited and agreed to participate in an online research panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: 2007-2018 Cumulative Dataset
    • DS2: 2007 General Population Dataset
    • DS3: 2008 Gender and Stress Dataset
    • DS4: 2009 Parent Perceptions of Children's Stress Dataset
    • DS5: 2010 Health Impact of Stress on Children and Families Dataset
    • DS6: 2011 Our Health Risk Dataset
    • DS7: 2012 Missing the Health Care Connection Dataset
    • DS8: 2013 Are Teens Adopting Adults' Stress Habits Dataset
    • DS9: 2014 Paying With Our Health Dataset
    • DS10: 2015 The Impact of Discrimination Dataset
    • DS11: 2016 Coping with Change, Part 1 Dataset
    • DS12: 2016 Coping with Change, Part 2: Technology and Social Media Dataset
    • DS13: 2017 The State of Our Nation Dataset
    • DS14: 2018 Stress and Generation Z Dataset
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 2007--2018
  • 2007 / 2018
  • Time period: 2007
  • Time period: 2008
  • Time period: 2009
  • Time period: 2010
  • Time period: 2011
  • Time period: 2012
  • Time period: 2013
  • Time period: 2014
  • Time period: 2015
  • Time period: 2016
  • Time period: 2016
  • Time period: 2017
  • Time period: 2018
  • Collection date: 2007-08-30--2018-08-28
  • 2007-08-30 / 2018-08-28
  • Collection date: 2007-08-30--2007-09-11
  • 2007-08-30 / 2007-09-11
  • Collection date: 2008-06-23--2008-08-13
  • 2008-06-23 / 2008-08-13
  • Collection date: 2009-07-21--2009-08-04
  • 2009-07-21 / 2009-08-04
  • Collection date: 2010-08-03--2010-08-27
  • 2010-08-03 / 2010-08-27
  • Collection date: 2011-08-11--2011-09-06
  • 2011-08-11 / 2011-09-06
  • Collection date: 2012-08-03--2012-08-31
  • 2012-08-03 / 2012-08-31
  • Collection date: 2013-08-03--2013-08-31
  • 2013-08-03 / 2013-08-31
  • Collection date: 2014-08-04--2014-08-29
  • 2014-08-04 / 2014-08-29
  • Collection date: 2015-08-03--2015-08-31
  • 2015-08-03 / 2015-08-31
  • Collection date: 2016-08-05--2016-08-31
  • 2016-08-05 / 2016-08-31
  • Collection date: 2017-01-05--2017-01-19
  • 2017-01-05 / 2017-01-19
  • Collection date: 2017-08-02--2017-08-31
  • 2017-08-02 / 2017-08-31
  • Collection date: 2018-07-27--2018-08-28
  • 2018-07-27 / 2018-08-28
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Respondents that are 18 years of age or older and lived in the United States Smallest Geographic Unit: Metropolitan Statistical Area
Sampling
2007-2018 Cumulative Dataset: A total of 43,007 interviews were conducted and merged into a single dataset by using the datasets of each wave. The 43,007 interviews included the following subgroups: Gender: Male (n=18,077); Female (n=24,845); Transgender (n=58); Race/Ethnicity: Asian (n=2,797); Hispanic (n=7,201); Black (n=7,596); All other (n=24,766); Age: 13-17 years old (n=1,710); 18-30 years old (n=8,031); 31-44 years old (n=9,463);; 45-63 years old (n=14,908); age 64 or older (n=8,895) Urbanicity: Urban: (n=18,366); Suburban: (n=17,057); Rural: (n=7584); Region: Northeast (n=9,273); Midwest (n=9,182); South (n=13,755); West (n=10,792); Non-U.S. State (n=2); Unknown (n=3); 2007 General Population: A total of interviews among 1,848 adults 18 years of age or older living in the U.S. were conducted. Included in the 1,848 interviews were interviews of 365 African American and 400 Hispanic adults.Interviews were conducted in English (n=1,745) and Spanish (n=103). 2008 Gender and Stress: A total of 3,760 interviews among the general population were conducted including 1,553 men and 2,207 women. In addition to the general population interviews, oversamples were collected, among adults residing in the following eight cities across the U.S.: Atlanta (n=243), Chicago (n=231), Denver (n=267), Detroit (n=235), Los Angeles (n=256), New York City (n=228), Seattle (n=259), and Washington D.C. (n=250). Interviews were conducted in English (n=3,760). 2009 Parent Perceptions of Children's Stress: A total of 3,202 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,202 interviews included the following subgroups: Gender: Male (n=1,494); Female (n=1,708); Race/Ethnicity: Asian (n=92); Hispanic (n=343); Black (n=371); All other (n=2,288); Generation: Millennials (18-30 years old) n=752; Xers (31-44 years old) n=694; Baby Boomers (45-63 years old) n=1,099; Matures (age 64 or older) n=656; Employment: Employed (n=1,869); Not Employed (n=584)(Looking for work n=207; Retired n=519; Stay-at-home spouses or partners n=181); Region: East (n=362); Midwest (n=340); South (n=516); West (n=349); Urbanicity: Urban: (n=1135); Suburban: (n=1,522); Rural: (n=545); Chronic illness: Has Chronic Conditions (n=2,162); Does not have chronic conditions (n=1,040); Parents of children aged 8-17 (n=639); In addition to the general population interviews, oversamples were collected in the following eight cities across the U.S.: Atlanta (n=227), Chicago (n=244), Denver (n=210), Detroit (n=223), Los Angeles (n=255), New York City (n=255), Seattle (n=205), and Washington D.C. (n=220). 2010 Health Impact of Stress on Children and Families: A total of 3,761 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,761 interviews included 402 interviews among parents of children aged 8-17. In addition to the general population interviews, an oversample were collected in the following eight cities across the U.S.: Atlanta (n=249), Chicago (n=260), Denver (n=216), Detroit (n=231), Los Angeles (n=256), New York City (n=258), Seattle (n=218), and Washington D.C. (n=234). 2011 Our Health Risk: A total of 4,784 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 4,784 interviews included 615 interviews among caregivers. In addition to the general population interviews, oversamples were collected of those with a chronic illness (n=3,282). This definition can be found in the following section: Chronic illness: Depression (n=1,140); Diabetes (n=869); Obesity (n=818); Heart disease (n=455); In addition to the general population interviews, oversamples were collected in the following eight cities across the U.S.: Atlanta (n=319), Chicago (n=331), Denver (n=260), Detroit (n=261), Los Angeles (n=339), New York City (n=312), Seattle (n=239), and Washington D.C. (n=305). 2012 Missing the Health Care Connection: A total of 3,735 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,735 interviews included interviews among the following: Generation: Millennials (18-33 years old) n=573; Xers (34-47 years old) n=687; Baby Boomers (48-66 years old) n=1,922; Matures (age 67 or older) n=550; Chronic illness: (n=2,665); In addition to the general population interviews, oversamples were collected in the following eight cities across the U.S.: Atlanta (n=239), Chicago (n=274), Denver (n=216), Detroit (n=243), Los Angeles (n=273), New York City (n=266), Seattle (n=218), and Washington D.C. (n=279). 2013 Are Teens Adopting Adults' Stress Habits?: A total of 1,950 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 1,950 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=847); Female (n=1,103); Generation: Millennials (18-34 years old) n=392; Xers (35-48 years old) n=379; Baby Boomers (49-67 years old) n=808; Matures (age 68 or older) n=371; Region: Northeast (n=442); Midwest (n=535); South(n=578); West (n=395); Hours per night of sleep: Less than 8 hours (n=1,374); Equal to or greater than 8 hours (n=576); Exercise frequency: less than once a week or not at all (n=795); once a week or more (n=1,155); Self-reported stress level: high stress (8-10 on a 10-point scale)(n=386); low stress (1-3 on a 10-point scale)(n=633); Parents with a child under 18 in the household: (n=333); In addition to the general population interviews collected, 1,018 interviews were conducted among teens aged 13-17. Included in the 1,018 interviews were interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=432); Female (n=586); Age Breakouts: Younger teens (13 to 14 years) n=294; Older teens (15 to 17 years old) n=724; Younger girls (n=160); Older girls (n=426): Younger boys (n=134); Older boys (n=298); Stress Level: Low stress in the past school year (n=174) or the past month (n=338); High stress in the past school year (n=316) or past month (n=149); Sleep: Less than 8 hours on a school night (n=503); Equal to or greater than 8 hours on a school night (n=514); Exercise: Less than once a week or not at all (n=216); once a week or more (n=802); 2014 Paying With Our Health: A total of 3,068 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,068 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=1,204); Female (n=1,864); Generation: Millennials (18-35 years old) n=720; Xers (36-49 years old) n=548; Baby Boomers (50-68 years old) n=1,324; Matures (age 69 or older) n=476; Income: Less than $50,000 (n=1,499); Greater than $50,000 (n=1,379); Region: Northeast (n=670); Midwest (n=776); South (n=984); West (n=637); Unknown (n=1); Emotional support: Yes (n=2,042); No (n=649); Parents with a child under 18 in the household: (n=569); 2015 The Impact of Discrimination: A total of 3,361 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,361 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=1,104); Female (n=2,244); Transgender (n=7); Race/Ethnicity: White (n=1,071); Hispanic (n=813); Black (n=825); Asian (n=416); Native American or Alaskan Native (n=199); Generation: Millennials (18-36 years old) n=1,190; Xers (37-50 years old) n=649; Baby Boomers (51-69 years old) n=1,130; Matures (age 70 or older) n=392; Poverty level: At or below 200 percent of the annual federal poverty guidelines (n=1,168); More than 200 percent of the annual poverty guidelines (n=1,897); Region: Northeast (n=687); Midwest (n=632); South (n=1,209); West (n=832); Unknown (n=1); Urbanicity: Urban: (n=1,304); Suburban: (n=1,389); Rural: (n= 668); Emotional support: Yes (n=2,366); No (n=674); Disability: Disabled (n=1,088); Not Disabled (n=2,222); LGBT: LGBT (n=232); Non-LGBT (n=3,043); Interviews were conducted in English (n=2,972), Spanish (n=306), Chinese (n=66), Vietnamese (n=9) and Korean (n=8). 2016 Coping with Change, Part 1: A total of 3,511 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,511 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=1,466); Female (n=2,027) Transgender (n=12); Race/Ethnicity: White (n=1,117); Hispanic (n=822); Black (n=803); Asian (n=522); Native American or Alaskan native (n=200); Generation: Millennials (18-37 years old) n=1,306; Xers (38-51 years old) n=746; Baby Boomers (52-70 years old) n=1,194; Matures (age 71 or older) n=265; Poverty level: At or below 200 percent of the annual federal poverty guidelines (n=1,135); More than 200 percent of the annual poverty guidelines (n=2,102); Region: East (n=746); Midwest (n=667); South (n=1,294); West (n=804); Urbanicity: Urban: (n=1,334); Suburban: (n=1,514); Rural: (n= 663); Emotional support: Yes (n=2,538); No (n=648); Parents: Parents (n=1,120); No children (n=146); Parents of teens (13-17) (n=303); Parents of teen girls (n=149); Parents of teen boys (n=154); Digital Connection: Constant checker (n=1,807); Non-constant checker (n=1,704); Constant checker of work email on a non-work day (n=283); Interviews were conducted in English (n=3,255) and Spanish (n=256). 2016 Coping with Change, Part 2: Technology and Social Media: A total of 1,019 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 1,019 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=456); Female (n=557) Transgender (n=2); Race/Ethnicity: White (n=449); Hispanic (n=210); Black (n=201); Asian (n=100); Native American or Alaskan native (n=50); Generation: millennials (18-37 years old) n=340; Xers (38-51 years old) n=222; baby boomers (52-70 years old) n=368; matures (age 71 or older) n=89; Poverty level: At or below 200 percent of the annual federal poverty guidelines (n=282); More than 200 percent of the annual poverty guidelines (n=675); Region: Northeast (n=238); Midwest (n=176); South (n=390); West (n=215) Urbanicity: Urban: (n=373); Suburban: (n=464); Rural: (n=182); Interviews were conducted in English (n=957) and Spanish (n=62). 2017 The State of Our Nation: A total of 3,340 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 3,340 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=1,376); Female (n=2,047); Transgender (n=10); Race/Ethnicity: White (n=1,088); Hispanic (n=810); Black (n=808); Asian (n=506); Native American or Alaskan Native (n=206); Generation: Millennials (18-38 years old) n=1,267; Xers (39-52 years old) n=767; baby boomers (53-71 years old) n=1,176; matures (age 72 or older) n=230; Poverty level: At or below 200 percent of the annual federal poverty guidelines (n=1,122); More than 200 percent of the annual poverty guidelines (n=2,087); Income: Less than $50,000 (n=1,612); Greater or equal to $50,000 (n=1,615); Region: East (n=772); Midwest (n=615); South (n=1,224); West (n=829); Urbanicity: Urban: (n=1,367); Suburban: (n=1,472); Rural: (n= 601); Chronic condition status: Yes (n=2,205); No (n=1,180); Insurance status: Yes (n=3,112); No (n=328); LGBT status: LGBT (n=237); Non-LGBT (n=3,129); Parents: Parents (n=1,182); No children (n=2,258); Political party affiliation: Democrat (n=1,454); Republican (n=698); Independent (n=672); Interviews were conducted in English (n=3,187) and Spanish (n=253). 2018 Stress and Generation Z: A total of 4,550 interviews among the general population were conducted. The 4,550 interviews included interviews among the following: Gender: Male (n=1,824); Female (n=2,695); Transgender (n=27); Race/Ethnicity: White (n=1,216); Hispanic (n=1,252); Black (n=800); Asian (n=534); Native American or Alaskan Native (n=202); Gen Z: White (n=187); Hispanic (n=505); black (n=537); Generation: Gen Z (15 to 21) n=1,323 (includes n=692 Gen Z "teens" and n=631 Gen Z "adults" 18-21); Millennials (22-39 years old) n=1,055; Xers (40-53 years old) n=735; Baby Boomers (54-72 years old) n=1,213; Matures or Older Adults (age 73 or older) n=224; Region: Northeast (n=824); Midwest (n=790); South (n=1,873); West (n=1063); Parents: Parents (n=1,454); No children (n=591); Political Party Affiliation: Democrat (n=1,922); Republican (n=796); Independent (n=844); Interviews were conducted in English (n=4,278) and Spanish (n=272).
Collection Mode
  • telephone interview
  • web-based survey
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 37288 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is previous version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR37288.v1

Update Metadata: 2019-06-24 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-06-24

American Psychological Association (2019): Stress in America, United States, 2007-2018. Archival Version. Version: v0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37288