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Replication data for: Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Duflo, Esther
  • Dupas, Pascaline
  • Kremer, Michael
Publication Date
2011-08-01
Description
  • Abstract

    To the extent that students benefit from high-achieving peers, tracking will help strong students and hurt weak ones. However, all students may benefit if tracking allows teachers to better tailor their instruction level. Lower-achieving pupils are particularly likely to benefit from tracking when teachers have incentives to teach to the top of the distribution. We propose a simple model nesting these effects and test its implications in a randomized tracking experiment conducted with 121 primary schools in Kenya. While the direct effect of high-achieving peers is positive, tracking benefited lower-achieving pupils indirectly by allowing teachers to teach to their level. (JEL I21, J45, O15)
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.101.5.1739 (Text)
Publications
  • Duflo, Esther, Pascaline Dupas, and Michael Kremer. “Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya.” American Economic Review 101, no. 5 (August 2011): 1739–74. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.101.5.1739.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.101.5.1739 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-11

Duflo, Esther; Dupas, Pascaline; Kremer, Michael (2011): Replication data for: Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E112446