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Replication data for: Why Don't We See Poverty Convergence?

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Ravallion, Martin
Publication Date
2012-02-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Average living standards are converging among developing countries and faster growing economies see more progress against poverty. Yet we do not find poverty convergence; countries starting with higher poverty rates do not see higher proportionate rates of poverty reduction. The paper tries to explain why. Analysis of a new dataset suggests that, at given mean consumption, high initial poverty has an adverse effect on consumption growth and also makes growth less poverty-reducing. Thus, for many poor countries, the growth advantage of starting out with a low mean is lost due to a high incidence of poverty. (JEL D63, I31, I32, O15)
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.102.1.504 (Text)
Publications
  • Ravallion, Martin. “Why Don’t We See Poverty Convergence?” American Economic Review 102, no. 1 (February 2012): 504–23. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.102.1.504.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.102.1.504 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-11

Ravallion, Martin (2012): Replication data for: Why Don't We See Poverty Convergence?. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E112500V1