My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Replication data for: Coercive Contract Enforcement: Law and the Labor Market in Nineteenth Century Industrial Britain

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Naidu, Suresh
  • Yuchtman, Noam
Publication Date
2013-02-01
Description
  • Abstract

    British Master and Servant law made employee contract breach a criminal offense until 1875. We develop a contracting model generating equilibrium contract breach and prosecutions, then exploit exogenous changes in output prices to examine the effects of labor demand shocks on prosecutions. Positive shocks in the textile, iron, and coal industries increased prosecutions. Following the abolition of criminal sanctions, wages differentially rose in counties that had experienced more prosecutions, and wages responded more to labor demand shocks. Coercive contract enforcement was applied in industrial Britain; restricted mobility allowed workers to commit to risk-sharing contracts with lower, but less volatile, wages. (JEL J31, J41, K12, K31, N33, N43)
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.1.107 (Text)
Publications
  • Naidu, Suresh, and Noam Yuchtman. “Coercive Contract Enforcement: Law and the Labor Market in Nineteenth Century Industrial Britain.” American Economic Review 103, no. 1 (February 2013): 107–44. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.103.1.107.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.103.1.107 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Naidu, Suresh; Yuchtman, Noam (2013): Replication data for: Coercive Contract Enforcement: Law and the Labor Market in Nineteenth Century Industrial Britain. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E112585