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Replication data for: The Growth of Low-Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the US Labor Market

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Autor, David H.
  • Dorn, David
Publication Date
2013-08-01
Description
  • Abstract

    We offer a unified analysis of the growth of low-skill service occupations between 1980 and 2005 and the concurrent polarization of US employment and wages. We hypothesize that polarization stems from the interaction between consumer preferences, which favor variety over specialization, and the falling cost of automating routine, codifiable job tasks. Applying a spatial equilibrium model, we corroborate four implications of this hypothesis. Local labor markets that specialized in routine tasks differentially adopted information technology, reallocated low-skill labor into service occupations (employment polarization), experienced earnings growth at the tails of the distribution (wage polarization), and received inflows of skilled labor.
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.5.1553 (Text)
Publications
  • Autor, David H, and David Dorn. “The Growth of Low-Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the US Labor Market.” American Economic Review 103, no. 5 (August 2013): 1553–97. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.103.5.1553.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.103.5.1553 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Autor, David H.; Dorn, David (2013): Replication data for: The Growth of Low-Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the US Labor Market. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E112652