My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Replication data for: The Short-Run and Long-Run Effects of Behavioral Interventions: Experimental Evidence from Energy Conservation

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Allcott, Hunt
  • Rogers, Todd
Publication Date
2014-10-01
Description
  • Abstract

    We document three remarkable features of the Opower program, in which social comparison-based home energy reports are repeatedly mailed to more than six million households nationwide. First, initial reports cause high-frequency "action and backsliding," but these cycles attenuate over time. Second, if reports are discontinued after two years, effects are relatively persistent, decaying at 10-20 percent per year. Third, consumers are slow to habituate: they continue to respond to repeated treatment even after two years. We show that the previous conservative assumptions about post-intervention persistence had dramatically understated cost effectiveness and illustrate how empirical estimates can optimize program design.
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.104.10.3003 (Text)
Publications
  • Allcott, Hunt, and Todd Rogers. “The Short-Run and Long-Run Effects of Behavioral Interventions: Experimental Evidence from Energy Conservation.” American Economic Review 104, no. 10 (October 2014): 3003–37. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.104.10.3003.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.104.10.3003 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Allcott, Hunt; Rogers, Todd (2014): Replication data for: The Short-Run and Long-Run Effects of Behavioral Interventions: Experimental Evidence from Energy Conservation. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E112692