My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Replication data for: Backward Induction in the Wild? Evidence from Sequential Voting in the US Senate

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Spenkuch, Jörg L.
  • Montagnes, B. Pablo
  • Magleby, Daniel B.
Publication Date
2018-07-01
Description
  • Abstract

    In the US Senate, roll calls are held in alphabetical order. We document that senators early in the order are less likely to vote with the majority of their own party than those whose last name places them at the end of the alphabet. To speak to the mechanism behind this result, we develop a simple model of sequential voting, in which forward-looking senators rely on backward induction in order to free ride on their colleagues. Estimating our model structurally, we find that this form of strategic behavior is an important part of equilibrium play. We also consider, but ultimately dismiss, alternative explanations related to learning about common values and vote buying.
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.20150993 (Text)
Publications
  • Spenkuch, Jörg L., B. Pablo Montagnes, and Daniel B. Magleby. “Backward Induction in the Wild? Evidence from Sequential Voting in the US Senate.” American Economic Review 108, no. 7 (July 2018): 1971–2013. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.20150993.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.20150993 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Spenkuch, Jörg L.; Montagnes, B. Pablo; Magleby, Daniel B. (2018): Replication data for: Backward Induction in the Wild? Evidence from Sequential Voting in the US Senate. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113078