My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Replication data for: Can Social Information Affect What Job You Choose and Keep?

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Coffman, Lucas C.
  • Featherstone, Clayton R.
  • Kessler, Judd B.
Publication Date
2017-01-01
Description
  • Abstract

    We show that the provision of social information influences a high-stakes decision and this influence persists over time. In a field experiment involving thousands of admits to Teach For America, those told about the previous year's matriculation rate are more likely to accept a teaching job, complete training, start, and return a second year. To show robustness, we develop a simple theory that identifies subgroups where we expect larger treatment effects and find our effect is larger in those subgroups. That social information can have a powerful, persistent effect on high-stakes behavior broadens its relevance for policy and theory.
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/app.20140468 (Text)
Publications
  • Coffman, Lucas C., Clayton R. Featherstone, and Judd B. Kessler. “Can Social Information Affect What Job You Choose and Keep?” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 9, no. 1 (January 2017): 96–117. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.20140468.
    • ID: 10.1257/app.20140468 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Coffman, Lucas C.; Featherstone, Clayton R.; Kessler, Judd B. (2017): Replication data for: Can Social Information Affect What Job You Choose and Keep?. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113623V1