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Replication data for: Does Early Life Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Permanently Harm Childhood Welfare? Evidence from Cigarette Tax Hikes

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Simon, David
Publication Date
2016-10-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Evidence suggests that excise taxes on tobacco improve fetal health. However, it remains unknown if smoke exposure in early life causes lasting harm to children. I find that in utero exposure to a dollar increase in the state cigarette tax causes a 10 percent decrease in sick days from school and a 4.7 percent decrease in having two or more doctor visits. I present additional evidence for decreases in hospitalizations and asthma. This supports the hypothesis that exposure to cigarette smoke in utero and infancy carries significant medium-term costs, and that excise taxes can lead to lasting intergenerational improvements in well-being.
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/app.20150476 (Text)
Publications
  • Simon, David. “Does Early Life Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Permanently Harm Childhood Welfare? Evidence from Cigarette Tax Hikes.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 8, no. 4 (October 2016): 128–59. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.20150476.
    • ID: 10.1257/app.20150476 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Simon, David (2016): Replication data for: Does Early Life Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Permanently Harm Childhood Welfare? Evidence from Cigarette Tax Hikes. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113665