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Replication data for: Texting Bans and Fatal Accidents on Roadways: Do They Work? Or Do Drivers Just React to Announcements of Bans?

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Abouk, Rahi
  • Adams, Scott
Publication Date
2013-04-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Since 2007, many states passed laws prohibiting text messaging while driving. Using vehicular fatality data from across the United States and standard difference-in-differences techniques, bans appear moderately successful at reducing single-vehicle, single-occupant accidents if bans are universally applied and enforced as a primary offense. Bans enforced as secondary offenses, however, have at best no effect on accidents. Any reduction in accidents following texting bans is short-lived, however, with accidents returning to near former levels within a few months. This is suggestive of drivers reacting to the announcement of the legislation only to return to old habits shortly afterward. (JEL D12, K42, R41)
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/app.5.2.179 (Text)
Publications
  • Abouk, Rahi, and Scott Adams. “Texting Bans and Fatal Accidents on Roadways: Do They Work? Or Do Drivers Just React to Announcements of Bans?” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 5, no. 2 (January 2013): 179–99. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.5.2.179.
    • ID: 10.1257/app.5.2.179 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 3 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Abouk, Rahi; Adams, Scott (2013): Replication data for: Texting Bans and Fatal Accidents on Roadways: Do They Work? Or Do Drivers Just React to Announcements of Bans?. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113849