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Replication data for: The Historically Evolving Impact of the Ogallala Aquifer: Agricultural Adaptation to Groundwater and Drought

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Hornbeck, Richard
  • Keskin, Pinar
Publication Date
2014-01-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Agriculture on the American Plains has been constrained historically by water scarcity. Post-WWII technologies enabled farmers over the Ogallala aquifer to extract groundwater for large-scale irrigation. Comparing counties over the Ogallala with nearby similar counties, groundwater access increased agricultural land values and initially reduced the impact of droughts. Over time, land use adjusted toward water intensive crops and drought sensitivity increased. Viewed differently, farmers in nearby water-scarce areas maintained lowervalue drought-resistant practices that fully mitigate naturally higher drought sensitivity. The evolving impact of the Ogallala illustrates the importance of water for agricultural production, but also the large scope for agricultural adaptation to groundwater and drought.
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/app.6.1.190 (Text)
Publications
  • Hornbeck, Richard, and Pinar Keskin. “The Historically Evolving Impact of the Ogallala Aquifer: Agricultural Adaptation to Groundwater and Drought.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 6, no. 1 (January 2014): 190–219. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.6.1.190.
    • ID: 10.1257/app.6.1.190 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-12

Hornbeck, Richard; Keskin, Pinar (2014): Replication data for: The Historically Evolving Impact of the Ogallala Aquifer: Agricultural Adaptation to Groundwater and Drought. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113876V1