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Replication data for: Is Personal Initiative Training a Substitute or Complement to the Existing Human Capital of Women? Results from a Randomized Trial in Togo

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Campos, Francisco
  • Frese, Michael
  • Goldstein, Markus
  • Iacovone, Leonardo
  • Johnson, Hillary C.
  • McKenzie, David
  • Mensmann, Mona
Publication Date
2018-05-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Personal initiative training—a psychology-based mindset training program—delivers lasting improvements for female business owners in Togo. Which types of women benefit most? Theories of dynamic complementarity would suggest training should work better for those with higher pre-existing human capital, but there are also reasons why existing human capital might inhibit training participation or substitute for its effects. We examine the heterogeneity in treatment impact according to different types of human capital. We find little evidence of either complementarities or substitutability, suggesting this new business training approach can work for a wide range of human capital levels.
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/pandp.20181026 (Text)
Publications
  • Campos, Francisco, Michael Frese, Markus Goldstein, Leonardo Iacovone, Hillary C. Johnson, David McKenzie, and Mona Mensmann. “Is Personal Initiative Training a Substitute or Complement to the Existing Human Capital of Women? Results from a Randomized Trial in Togo.” AEA Papers and Proceedings 108 (2018): 256–61. https://doi.org/10.1257/pandp.20181026.
    • ID: 10.1257/pandp.20181026 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-13

Campos, Francisco; Frese, Michael; Goldstein, Markus; Iacovone, Leonardo; Johnson, Hillary C. et. al. (2018): Replication data for: Is Personal Initiative Training a Substitute or Complement to the Existing Human Capital of Women? Results from a Randomized Trial in Togo. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E114440