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Closer to Home: Low Glorifiers Defend Ingroup-Perpetrated Violence when Intergroup Conflicts are Perceived as Tangible Rather than Intangible

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • McLamore, Quinnehtukqut (University of Massachusetts-Amherst)
  • Leidner, Bernhard (University of Massachusetts-Amherst)
Publication Date
2019-01-03
Funding Reference
  • National Science Foundation
    • Award Number: OGCA
  • Binational Science Foundation
    • Award Number: OGCA
Description
  • Abstract

    Members of groups in conflict often react defensively to ingroup-perpetrated violence. While people that strongly glorify their ingroup (high glorifiers) are generally ingroup-defensive, it is unclear under what conditions low glorifiers are ingroup-defensive or non-defensive. Six studies tested whether the relative tangibility of a conflict context shapes defensiveness among low glorifiers. Low glorifiers were defensive of ingroup-perpetrated violence in a naturalistically tangible conflict context (the Syrian conflict for Jewish Israelis, Studies 1a and 2a) but were non-defensive in a naturalistically intangible conflict context (the Syrian conflict for Americans, Studies 1b and 2b). Serbians (Study 3) and Americans (Study 4) found that low glorifiers were more defensive of ingroup-perpetrated violence when the conflict context was experimentally manipulated to be tangible rather than intangible. These findings contribute to the study of conflict resolution by highlighting the important role of tangibility and individual differences in glorification in determining defensive responses to ingroup-perpetrated violence.
Availability
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Update Metadata: 2019-10-24 | Issue Number: 1 | Registration Date: 2019-10-24

McLamore, Quinnehtukqut; Leidner, Bernhard (2019): Closer to Home: Low Glorifiers Defend Ingroup-Perpetrated Violence when Intergroup Conflicts are Perceived as Tangible Rather than Intangible. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E115042V1