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The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV), [United States], 2013-2017

Version
v2
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Taylor, Bruce
  • Mumford, Elizabeth
  • Liu, Weiwei
  • Giordano, Peggy
Other Title
  • Version 2 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2017-06-30
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
adolescents; children; dating (social); domestic violence; family relationships; friendships; households; intimate partner violence; intimate partners; parent child relationship; parental attitudes; sexual assault; sexual behavior; violence against women; young adults; youths
Description
  • Abstract

    The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) examines the changing nature of adolescent dating relationships, particularly those marked by adolescent relationship abuse (ARA). More specifically, this study was designed to produce nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of multiple forms of ARA among youth (ages 10-18), to document the characteristics of abusive relationships during adolescence, to assess ARA risk factors, and to situate these estimates within the environment of adolescents' key social relationships and communications. STRiV includes individual data from a nationally representative sample of households with at least one resident youth. Baseline and follow-up surveys were completed using a secure web survey with toll-free telephone and online help available.
  • Abstract

    The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) examined the changing nature of adolescent dating relationships, particularly those marked by adolescent relationship abuse (ARA). More specifically, this study was designed to produce nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of multiple forms of ARA among youth (ages 10-18), to document the characteristics of abusive relationships during adolescence, to assess ARA risk factors, and to situate these estimates within the environment of adolescents' key social relationships and communications. The goals of this study included the following: Provide a national portrait of the prevalence of varying categories of ARA victimization and perpetration, including levels of physical and emotional injury, and describe how exposure to these forms of ARA varies by gender, socio-economic status and other key demographic characteristics. ; Identify specific conditional attitudes, dating relationship characteristics, and peer network dynamics associated with ARA risk, and to determine whether these pathways are uniquely gendered. ; Investigate specific consequences of ARA to dating relationships, and whether the adolescent discloses information about ARA incidents to peers and others and their responses. ;
  • Methods

    Researchers recruited a nationally representative sample of 5,105 households with at least one resident youth between the ages of 10 and 18 to complete an adult parent or caregiver baseline survey and a separate child survey online from October 2013 to January 2014. Of the 5,105 recruited households, 556 of the sample actively refused to participate in the study and 1,816 did not respond to the invitation. While the GfK/KnowledgePanel used to collect respondents consisted of a database of resident children, a further 279 households were screened ineligible (for example, the expected youth did not reside in the household), equivalent to about 7% of the responding sample. The 2,354 completed youth surveys represent a participation rate of 50% among eligible households. A somewhat larger group of parents agreed to do the baseline survey (n=2,645); 2,354 of the children of these parents completed a baseline survey. If the recipient parent or adult caregiver (PCG) consented to participate, a web survey algorithm randomly chose an eligible child in that household to participate in the study. Next, the participating child and PCG received an invitation by e-mail to complete the surveys, which were presented sequentially with child assent required prior to child participation. For the youth survey, the PCG consent rate (for self and child participation) was 82.6%, and the child assent rate was 98.3%. Communications with the PCG stressed the importance of allowing the selected child to complete the survey privately. While the 40-minute youth survey was available in English or Spanish, few youth respondents selected the Spanish option (n=128, 5%). Each youth and parent was provided a small cash incentive ($10 each) for completing the baseline survey. At each data collection wave, GfK reviewed the STRiV cohort status to prepare invitations for those who remained active Knowledge Panelists and those who had withdrawn from the KnowledgePanel (i.e., accepting no new studies) but remained active in the STRiV study; a small group of respondents who had withdrawn permanently from the KnowledgePanel and all ongoing studies were lost to follow-up. Households were offered a $20 incentive for completing the baseline surveys through the GfK points system.
  • Methods

    STRiV includes the following variables: demographic variables (gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, employment status, U.S. Census region, metropolitan area, and Internet access);; household composition including gender and age of all children between ages of 10 and 18;; parent's characterization of child's traits (e.g. athletic, angry, often upset);; parent's characterization of relationship with child and partner;; parent's beliefs about child's current or future dating behavior;; parent's opinions about and/or perpetration of behaviors related to intimate partner violence; child's characterization of relationship with parent;; child's characterization of child's traits (e.g. even-tempered, angry); child's beliefs about dating relationships, including balance of power (e.g. girls should have the same freedom as boys);; child's relationship experience;; child's opinions about behaviors related to intimate partner violence;; child's experiences with intimate partner violence (victimization and/or perpetration);; child's experiences with sexual harassment and abuse (victimization and/or perpetration);; child's participation in illegal activities;; child's characterization of major friendships;;
  • Methods

    Response Rates: 50% of eligible households participated in the baseline survey. 62.5% of households completing the baseline survey also participated in the Wave 2 follow-up. The wave 3 response rate of youth baseline respondents was 70.5% and the wave 4 response rate of youth baseline respondents was 69.5%.
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Wave 1
    • DS2: Wave 2
    • DS3: Wave 3
    • DS4: Wave 4
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 2013--2017
  • 2013 / 2017
  • Collection date: 2013-10--2014-01
  • 2013-10 / 2014-01
  • Collection date: 2014-10--2015-05
  • 2014-10 / 2015-05
  • Collection date: 2015-10--2016-05
  • 2015-10 / 2016-05
  • Collection date: 2016-10--2017-07
  • 2016-10 / 2017-07
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
US households with at least one resident youth age 10-18. Smallest Geographic Unit: State
Sampling
Respondents to the National Survey on Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) were recruited from the GfK/KnowledgePanel, a national household address-based probability sample (50,000+ members ages 18 and older) of the United States. A full description of the panel is available from GfK. From an address-based sampling (ABS) frame covering approximately 97% of U.S. households, randomly sampled households were invited to join KnowledgePanel through postal invitations (English and Spanish) and by telephone follow-up. Using dual sample frames, panel members were further recruited via listed and unlisted telephone numbers, telephone and non-telephone households, and cell phone only households, as well as households with and without internet access. To assure national representativeness, researchers applied the KnowledgePanel statistical weights (see "Weights" below).
Collection Mode
  • web-based survey
Note
2019-10-29 Waves 1 and 2 were originally released as part of NACJD's Fast Track Release. As part of the release of Waves 3 and 4, the data for Waves 1 and 2 has received further curation, and is now available in all data packages. No data has been modified, and previously-available documentation has simply been organized differently. Funding institution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-WG-BX-0020). United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2014-VA-CX-0065).
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 36499 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)
Relations
  • Is new version of
    DOI: 10.3886/ICPSR36499.v1
Publications
  • Copp, Jennifer E., Taylor, Bruce G., Mumford, Elizabeth A.. Financial behaviors, couple-level conflict, and adolescent relationship abuse: Longitudinal results from a nationally representative sample. Journal of Research on Adolescence.2019.
    • ID: 10.1111/jora.12470 (DOI)
  • Mumford, Elizabeth A., Liu, Weiwei, Taylor, Bruce G.. Longitudinal trajectories of perpetration of adolescent dating abuse in a national sample. Aggressive Behavior.2019.
    • ID: 10.1002/ab.21822 (DOI)
  • Mumford, Elizabeth A., Okeke, Nnenna, Rothman, Emily. Young men's attitudes and neighborhood risk factors for sexual harassment perpetration in the United States. Journal of Community Health.2019.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10900-019-00738-2 (DOI)
  • Taylor, Bruce G., Liu, Weiwei, Mumford, Elizabeth A.. Profiles of youth in-person and online sexual harassment victimization. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2019.
    • ID: 10.1177/0886260518820673 (DOI)
  • Liu, Weiwei, Mumford, Elizabeth A., Taylor, Bruce G.. The relationship between parents’ intimate partner victimization and youths’ adolescent relationship abuse. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.47, (2), 321-333.2018.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10964-017-0733-1 (DOI)
  • Copp, J., Mumford, E.A., Taylor, B.G.. Financial behaviors and adolescent dating relationship abuse: Instrumental support, economic control, and financial socialization. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.2017.
  • Joseph, Hannah, Taylor, Bruce, Mumford, Elizabeth A.. Romantic Relationship Characteristics and Adolescent Relationship Abuse in a Nationally Representative Sample. NORC Working Paper Series.NORC at the University of Chicago. 2017.
    • ID: http://www.norc.org/PDFs/Working%20Paper%20Series/WP-2017-004.pdf (URL)
  • Mumford, Elizabeth A., Taylor, Bruce G., Giordano, Peggy C.. Perpetration of adolescent dating relationship abuse: The role of conditional tolerance for violence and friendship factors. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2017.
    • ID: 10.1177/0886260517693002 (DOI)
  • Taylor, Bruce, Joseph, Hannah, Mumford, Elizabeth. Romantic relationship characteristics and adolescent relationship abuse in a probability-based sample of youth. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2017.
    • ID: 10.1177/0886260517730566 (DOI)
  • Copp, Jennifer E., Mumford, Elizabeth A., Taylor, Bruce G.. Money lending practices and adolescent dating relationship abuse: Results from a national sample. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.45, (9), 1902-1916.2016.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10964-016-0521-3 (DOI)
  • Mumford, Elizabeth A., Liu, Weiwei, Taylor, Bruce G.. Parenting profiles and adolescent dating relationship abuse: Attitudes and experiences. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.45, (5), 959-972.2016.
    • ID: 10.1007/s10964-016-0448-8 (DOI)
  • Taylor, Bruce G., Mumford, Elizabeth A.. A national descriptive portrait of adolescent relationship abuse: Results from the National Survey on Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.31, (6), 963-988.2016.
    • ID: 10.1177/0886260514564070 (DOI)
  • NORC at the University of Chicago. Preliminary Results in Landmark National Survey on Teen Dating Violence Finds Disturbingly High Rates of Victimization and Perpetration by Both Girls and Boys. Bethesda, MD: NORC at the University of Chicago. 2014.
    • ID: http://www.norc.org/NewsEventsPublications/PressReleases/Pages/preliminary-results-in-landmark-national-survey-on-teen-dating-violence-finds-disturbingly-high-rates-of-victimization.aspx (URL)

Update Metadata: 2019-10-29 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-10-29

Taylor, Bruce; Mumford, Elizabeth; Liu, Weiwei; Giordano, Peggy (2017): The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV), [United States], 2013-2017. Version 2. Version: v2. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36499.v2