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Replication data for: Surviving Andersonville: The Benefits of Social Networks in POW Camps

Version
V0
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Costa, Dora L.
  • Kahn, Matthew E.
Publication Date
2007-09-01
Description
  • Abstract

    Twenty-seven percent of the Union Army prisoners captured July 1863 or later died in captivity. At Andersonville, the death rate may have been as high as 40 percent. How did men survive such horrific conditions? Using two independent datasets, we find that friends had a statistically significant positive effect on survival probabilities and that the closer the ties between friends as measured by such identifiers as ethnicity, kinship, and the same hometown, the bigger was the impact of friends on survival probabilities. (JEL N41, Z13)
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.97.4.1467 (Text)
Publications
  • Costa, Dora L, and Matthew E Kahn. “Surviving Andersonville: The Benefits of Social Networks in POW Camps.” American Economic Review 97, no. 4 (August 2007): 1467–87. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.97.4.1467.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.97.4.1467 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2019-12-07

Costa, Dora L.; Kahn, Matthew E. (2007): Replication data for: Surviving Andersonville: The Benefits of Social Networks in POW Camps. Version: V0. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E116292