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Replication data for: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: Understanding Pro-cyclical Mortality

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Stevens, Ann H.
  • Miller, Douglas L.
  • Page, Marianne E.
  • Filipski, Mateusz
Publication Date
2015-11-01
Description
  • Abstract

    It is well-known that mortality rates are pro-cyclical. In this paper, we attempt to understand why. We find little evidence that cyclical changes in individuals' own employment-related behavior drives the relationship; own-group employment rates are not systematically related to own-group mortality. Further, most additional deaths that occur when the economy is strong are among the elderly, particularly elderly women and those residing in nursing homes. We also demonstrate that staffing in nursing homes moves countercyclically. These findings suggest that cyclical fluctuations in the quality of health care may be a critical contributor to cyclical movements in mortality. (JEL E24, E32, I12, J16, L84)
Availability
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Relations
  • Is supplement to
    DOI: 10.1257/pol.20130057 (Text)
Publications
  • Stevens, Ann H., Douglas L. Miller, Marianne E. Page, and Mateusz Filipski. “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: Understanding Pro-Cyclical Mortality.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 7, no. 4 (November 2015): 279–311. https://doi.org/10.1257/pol.20130057.
    • ID: 10.1257/pol.20130057 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-05-18 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2020-04-30

Stevens, Ann H.; Miller, Douglas L.; Page, Marianne E.; Filipski, Mateusz (2015): Replication data for: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: Understanding Pro-cyclical Mortality. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E114568V1-24012