My da|ra Login

Detailed view

metadata language: English

Replication data for: Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Lemieux, Thomas
Publication Date
2006-06-01
Description
  • Abstract

    This paper shows that a large fraction of the 1973-2003 growth in residual wage inequality is due to composition effects linked to the secular increase in experience and education, two factors associated with higher within-group wage dispersion. The level and growth in residual wage inequality are also overstated in the March Current Population Survey (CPS) because, unlike the May or Outgoing Rotation Group (ORG) CPS, it does not measure directly the hourly wages of workers paid by the hour. The magnitude and timing of the growth in residual wage inequality provide little evidence of a pervasive increase in the demand for skill due to skill-biased technological change. (JEL J31)
Availability
Download
Relations
  • Is version of
    DOI: 10.3886/E116216
Publications
  • Lemieux, Thomas. “Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?” American Economic Review 96, no. 3 (May 2006): 461–98. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.96.3.461.
    • ID: 10.1257/aer.96.3.461 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-07-20 | Issue Number: 1 | Registration Date: 2020-07-20

Lemieux, Thomas (2006): Replication data for: Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E116216V1-43221