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Adoption of Innovations in Private Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers in the United States [Restricted-Use], 2009-2013

Version
v1
Resource Type
Dataset : survey data
Creator
  • Roman, Paul M.
  • Aletraris, Lydia
Other Title
  • Version 1 (Subtitle)
Publication Date
2020-08-12
Publication Place
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publisher
  • Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Funding Reference
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse
Language
English
Free Keywords
Schema: ICPSR
administrators; alcohol dependence; caseloads; detoxification; health care services; legislation; medical care; medication assisted treatment; opioid use disorder; prescription drugs; substance abuse treatment; substance use; treatment facilities
Description
  • Abstract

    Adoption of Innovations in Private Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers is a multi-wave longitudinal study conducted between 2009 and 2013. The study goal was to measure the adoption and implementation of evidence-based treatment practices in treatment centers that received more than 50 percent of their total operational funding from sources that were not guaranteed from year to year. This definition is based on the concept of entrepreneurship, namely the necessity for the treatment organization to respond to changing conditions in the external political and economic environment in order to obtain half or more of its funding. The innovations considered are of three types usually specific to organizations treating substance use disorders: medication-assisted treatments; psychosocial treatments; managerial practices; This data set consists of one of the multiple "waves" of data collection. The data was collected at four points in time. The baseline data, collected from June 2009 through October 2011 from 327 treatment centers, were obtained through face-to-face onsite interviews ranging from 1 to 4 hours in duration. These interviews were conducted with administrators of the respective treatment centers. In 70 of the 327 treatment centers, an administrator of the overall center and the administrator of clinical operations separately completed administrative and clinical interviews. In the remaining 257 centers, all of the administrative and clinical data were collected from the administrator of the overall center since there was no specialized administrator of clinical operations. The baseline data available here merge the data collected through these two different procedures so that the variables measured are identical for all centers regardless of the procedure. The collected data include detailed information on Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and other treatment strategies used by the center to treat opioid use disorder (OUD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD). In cases where medications were not used by a center questions were asked for reasons why available medications were not used in treatment. Other sections of the interviews covered data on the organizations, their management, and other clinical practices implemented for OUD, AUD, and substance use disorder (SUD). Three follow-up interviews were conducted via telephone at six month intervals following the previous interview. These follow-up interviews were much shorter compared to the baseline interview. The interviews centered on key changes in the center's operation and on the adoption of key innovations. But a focus of the follow-up interviews still focused on medications provided for treatment.
  • Abstract

    The purpose of this data collection was to investigate the organizational structure and managerial practices within substance use disorder (SUD) treatment organizations to increase the utilization of evidence-based practices (EBP) for SUD. Another purpose was to measure the adoption and implementation of evidence-based treatment practices in treatment centers that received more than 50 percent of their total operational funding from sources that were not guaranteed from year to year.
  • Methods

    The baseline on-site interview with administrators and clinicians focused on four things to provide evidence for adoption and implementation of innovations to improve treatment outcomes. These included: External environments surrounding the organization; Organizatonal structure and production (treatment) processes; Patterns of organizational management and leadership; Characteristics, practices, and attitudes of counselors in implementing core technologies in the production (treatment) processes; The three follow-up interviews primarily ask the center administrator about the use of medications within the center. The medications asked about include: Antabuse (disulfiram); Methadone; Buprenorphine (Subutex or Suboxone); Acamprosate (Campral); Naltrexone (tablet); Naltrexone (injectable - Vivitrol); Topamax (topiramate); Some variation exists between medications and across the interviews on the specific details concerning each medication asked about. However, the questions asked consistently across the medications include: Does the center prescribe (medication)?; What percentage of patients receive (medication)?; If use of (medication) was discontinued, why was it discontinued?; If there was a large decrease in the percentage of patients being prescribed (medication), why was that the case?; Other sections of the survey instruments ask about the center's caseload (counts and percentages), and the administrator's knowledge / familiarity of various programs and legislation and how those things affect the center.
  • Methods

    ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..
  • Methods

    Response Rates: 6 month: 63.6 percent (208 out of 327 centers); 12 month: 59.3 percent (194 out of 327 centers); 18 month: 48.0 percent (157 out of 327 centers);
  • Abstract

    Datasets:

    • DS0: Study-Level Files
    • DS1: Baseline Data
    • DS2: 6 Month Follow-Up Data
    • DS3: 12 Month Follow-Up Data
    • DS4: 18 Month Follow-Up Data
Temporal Coverage
  • Time period: 2009--2013
  • 2009 / 2013
  • Collection date: 2009--2013
  • 2009 / 2013
Geographic Coverage
  • United States
Sampled Universe
Substance abuse treatment centers in the contiguous 48 states and the District of Columbia.
Sampling
A sample of 450 SUD treatment centers was drawn through a multi-level sampling technique using combinations of censuses of SUD treatment organizations and population density across the U.S. as part of a larger data collection effort about the adoption and implementation of evidence based practices for the treatment of SUD. This sampling technique was followed by intensive telephone screening to construct sampling universes and eliminate ineligible SUD treatment centers. Eligibility included a minimum size requirement, multiple staff, dependence on a least 50 percent of income generated from unsecured sources, and presence of multiple levels of SUD care as prescribed by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) standards of care. Centers not open to all community members were also excluded (e.g, Veterans Administration and prison based). The "waves" are lodged in longitudinal designs, not a panel design, with replacements comparable to those lost added for treatment centers that had closed or refused to participate. The baseline data for this collection that begun in June 2009 included 327 treatment centers.
Collection Mode
  • on-site questionnaire
  • telephone interview
Note
Funding institution(s): United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse (R37 DA 013110).
Availability
Delivery
One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
Alternative Identifiers
  • 37621 (Type: ICPSR Study Number)

Update Metadata: 2020-08-12 | Issue Number: 2 | Registration Date: 2020-08-12

Roman, Paul M.; Aletraris, Lydia (2020): Adoption of Innovations in Private Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers in the United States [Restricted-Use], 2009-2013. Version 1. Version: v1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37621.v1