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Replication data for: Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Bertrand, Marianne
  • Mullainathan, Sendhil
Publication Date
2004-09-01
Description
  • Abstract

    We study race in the labor market by sending fictitious resumes to help-wanted ads in Boston and Chicago newspapers. To manipulate perceived race, resumes are randomly assigned African-American- or White-sounding names. White names receive 50 percent more callbacks for interviews. Callbacks are also more responsive to resume quality for White names than for African-American ones. The racial gap is uniform across occupation, industry, and employer size. We also find little evidence that employers are inferring social class from the names. Differential treatment by race still appears to still be prominent in the U. S. labor market.
Availability
Download
This study is freely available to the general public via web download.
Relations
  • Is version of
    DOI: 10.3886/E116023
Publications
  • Bertrand, Marianne, and Sendhil Mullainathan. “Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination.” American Economic Review 94, no. 4 (August 2004): 991–1013. https://doi.org/10.1257/0002828042002561.
    • ID: 10.1257/0002828042002561 (DOI)

Update Metadata: 2020-08-14 | Issue Number: 1 | Registration Date: 2020-08-14

Bertrand, Marianne; Mullainathan, Sendhil (2004): Replication data for: Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination. Version: 1. ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.3886/E116023V1-43564