Handball training data

Version
1
Resource Type
Dataset
Creator
  • Rhibi, Fatma (University of Rennes 2)
Publication Date
2021-02-20
Description
  • Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Muscle strength, power, and change-of-direction speed constitute major physical qualities that are needed to successfully perform in team handball. Accordingly, these physical qualities should be developed during all stages of long-term athletic development. Thus, we aimed to compare the effects of machine-based resistance training versus resistance training using the own body mass on selected components of physical fitness in adolescent handball players. METHODS: Thirty-six male adolescent, aged 12-16 years, handball players were randomly assigned to three groups. One group performed machine-based resistance training (machine-based RT, n=12, age=14.6±0.5 years, PHV=+1.2±0.2) for 12 weeks with 2 sessions/week while another group conducted circuit-based RT using the own body mass for the same time period and weekly training frequency (body mass-based RT, n=12, age=14.8±0.4 years, PHV=+1.2±0.3). A third group acted as an active control and performed their regular handball training (CG, n=12, age=14.4±0.9 years, PHV=+1.0±0.1). Training volumes throughout the study were similar between the three groups. Pre and post training, all players were assessed for their muscle strength (one repetition maximum [1-RM] during half-squat [HS], bench press [BP], pull-over [PO]), vertical and horizontal jump and throw performances (squat jump [SJ] height, countermovement jump [CMJ] height, distance during the five time jump test [5JT], distance with the medicine ball throw test [MBT]), speed (repeated sprint ability [RSA]), linear sprint speed (5-m linear sprint time), change-of-direction speed (modified change-of-direction T-test [MAT]). RESULTS: The statistical analysis revealed significant group x time interactions for the 1-RM during HS (p<0.01, d=1.52), 1-RM during PO (p<0.01; d=0.75), SJ and CMJ tests (SJ: p<0.01, d=0.58; CMJ: p<0.01, d=1.52), the 5JT (p<0.01, d=0.92), and the MAT test (p<0.01, d=0.90). Post-hoc tests revealed larger adaptive gains in CMJ height (+12.1%, p<0.01, d = 0.48, small) following body mass-based RT. Conversely, post-hoc tests showed larger adaptive gains in 1-RM during HS (+1.8%; p<0.001; d= 0.30, small) and during PO (+2.5%; p<0.001; d= 0.30, small) as well as the 5JT (+16.2%; p<0.001; d = 0.92, medium) and MAT (-3.9%; p < 0.05; d=0.97, medium) following machine-based RT. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that selected components of physical fitness increased in both, machine-based RT and body mass-based RT compared to CG. Body mass-based RT induced larger improvements in measures of horizontal and vertical jump performances, speed and change-of-direction speed compared to machine-based RT. However, machine-based RT showed larger improvements in muscle strength variables. Coaches may thus opt to use both programs that induced relatively complementary adaptive processes, and as such both could be applied in youth handball. @font-face {font-family:"MS Mincho"; panose-1:2 2 6 9 4 2 5 8 3 4; mso-font-alt:"MS 明朝"; mso-font-charset:128; mso-generic-font-family:modern; mso-font-pitch:fixed; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1791491579 134217746 0 131231 0;}@font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;}@font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-469750017 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;}@font-face {font-family:"\@MS Mincho"; panose-1:2 2 6 9 4 2 5 8 3 4; mso-font-charset:128; mso-generic-font-family:modern; mso-font-pitch:fixed; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1791491579 134217746 0 131231 0;}p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0cm; margin-right:0cm; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"MS Mincho"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:PT-BR; mso-fareast-language:PT-BR;}.MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:11.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"MS Mincho"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:PT-BR; mso-fareast-language:PT-BR;}.MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; line-height:115%;}div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;}
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  • Is version of
    DOI: 10.3886/E132881

Update Metadata: 2021-02-20 | Issue Number: 1 | Registration Date: 2021-02-20